Quantcast

Various beginner questions

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

billygun81

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
15
Location
Henderson, Kentucky
What is the most complete book about design/theory and construction of a aircraft? Doesnt have to be gear toward a certain type of aircraft. Lots of graphics preferred.

As far as aircraft aluminum for the wings, spar, frame, fuselage etc..., what type of aluminum is used? Where can this aluminium be obtained? Can certain aluminum parts also be purchased from hardware/building supply stores?

Where would i find diagrams, pictures/graphics, reading material, about flight controls, rigging, hardware, connectors etc... to the ailerons, rudder, stabilizer, flaps?

Many more questions to come.
 

wsimpso1

Super Moderator
Staff member
Log Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2003
Messages
7,297
Location
Saline Michigan
Lots of good books. Look at the forum FAQ's for lists of publications by type.

Wicks Aircraft and Aircraft Spruce and Specialty are the two big houses that have "everything". There are houses that really specialize on aluminum, others for fasteners, etc.

Seriously check out the resource lists in the FAQ's and stuff at the head of the forum listings. Once you have done that, you will have a lot more informed questions.

Billski
 

BJC

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
12,011
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
Start by reviewing the "Sticky" threads here https://www.homebuiltairplanes.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=61

As mentioned, there are good FAQ's under several discussion areas that should be reviewed.

There are internet links of interest here https://www.homebuiltairplanes.com/forums/showthread.php?t=27027&highlight=

And, perhaps the best place to get started, is at your local EAA chapter https://www.eaa.org/en/eaa/eaa-chapters/find-an-eaa-chapter where you can meet experienced builders.

Welcome to HBA.


BJC
 

billygun81

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
15
Location
Henderson, Kentucky
I have seen a few aircraft construction/ design books. Alot of them are incomplete, vague or too specialized in a certain areas while leaving other areas out.

I am looking for the most COMPLETE design/theory/construction book(s) avaliable.

The book(s) that are the "go to" everytime. First to grab, indispensable.

I am looking for a list of 3-5 books that everyone has to have on their book shelf.

Also i accidently added the same post twice. How in the world do i delete the other post? Cant find an option on the edit page.
 

kent Ashton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
761
Location
Concord, NC
There are several hundred builder sites on the net that will show you lots. A good way to start is with a Google Images search of a plane or process that interests you. The images will lead you to the sites. Also Bing Images, they sometimes have different pictures.
 

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,800
Location
Wisconsin
Design, theory & construction is seldom found in one book. They are very different subjects.

Set a goal and take bite sizes pieces and figure it out one piece at a time.

What is your mission? Define that and the correct people will help you figure this out.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
13,833
Location
Memphis, TN
I would buy a set of plans, for a homebuilt you might like to build and study them. Design is a much bigger deal than following what someone else has done. Sometimes you can move ideas about, but to really design you need put pen to paper. Just drawing an airplane out and making it does not really mean it as designed. Lots of numbers in to making it safe. Materials used will depend on the design.
 

Dana

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 3, 2007
Messages
9,448
Location
CT, USA
I am looking for a list of 3-5 books that everyone has to have on their book shelf.

Also i accidently added the same post twice. How in the world do i delete the other post? Cant find an option on the edit page.
If you're not an engineer Raymers Simplified Aircraft Design for Homebuilders (I think that's the title) is generally recommended as the best place to start.

I merged the two threads you started into one.

Dana
 

dcstrng

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2010
Messages
913
Location
VA or NoDak
"Simplified Aircraft Design for Homebuilders" is certainly good, and has stood the test of time -- I also like Chris Heintz' "Flying on Your Own Wings" although some are not as impressed as me... But in the home-builders world I don't think there is any one book... See Bird's "Elements of Sport Airplane Design for the Homebuilder" Crawford's "Airplane Design" used to be well recognized. and although there is little "builder stuff" in it, Abbottt and Doenhoff's "Theory of Wing Sections" is dated, but not out of date (and I dare say is in a gazillion enthusiasts libraries... Lastly, if you can find a copy of Hoffman's "Engineering for the Amateur Aircraft Builder" it is worth the hunt... There are of course a dozen or so recognized engineering texts, that may or may not be useful (to anybody) based on your pedantic proclivities...
 

lr27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2007
Messages
3,822
If you're going to design something that's significantly different from another, existing aircraft, prepare for a lot of work. Or get your will updated. I'm not trying to be discouraging. If you design and build an airplane that does what you want it to, that will be an IMPRESSIVE accomplishment.

How much background do you have in engineering?

As far as aluminum goes, you don't always have to have anything fancy. Some parts are limited by buckling. Buckling is a function of stiffness, and aluminum alloys generally have the same elastic modulus, so something relatively ordinary may be fine. But don't get hung up on one particular material yet unless you already have the skills.

EAA has some books that may be useful for you, though I don't know offhand which ones.

When I'm thinking about airplane design, I often refer to Fluid Dynamic Lift and Fluid Dynamic Drag. But that would be a big dent in your budget.

You can also get a lot of the theory from old NACA publications. You can find many of them on the NTRS server and at the Magic NACA Archive. Google, and presumably other search engines, knows where they are. I don't know which of the Dover publications about aircraft are good, but they tend to be affordable. I think they have an edition of Theory of Wing Sections.

I found Alex Strojnik's Laminar Aircraft series informative, but that's another big dent in your budget. It covers a bunch of things besides how to get laminar flow on your airplane.

Keep in mind that I haven't designed a whole airplane, though I have a couple of conceptual designs that I've spent some time with. I haven't built one anywhere large enough to carry a person, either.
 

billygun81

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
15
Location
Henderson, Kentucky
Thanks guys for the information. I plan to find those books stated above and begin to design my aircraft while referring questions to the forum and get feedback and suggestions to what needs to be included or removed. I hope to post pictures to clarify any questions/issues that i come across.

Before i acquire those books, I have a question which i will ask here as well as post a separate thread.

What determines the length and width of the airplane. Width includes the fuselage as well as the plane as a whole to the wingtips.

Thanks again.
 

lr27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2007
Messages
3,822
Thanks guys for the information. I plan to find those books stated above and begin to design my aircraft while referring questions to the forum and get feedback and suggestions to what needs to be included or removed. I hope to post pictures to clarify any questions/issues that i come across.

Before i acquire those books, I have a question which i will ask here as well as post a separate thread.

What determines the length and width of the airplane. Width includes the fuselage as well as the plane as a whole to the wingtips.

Thanks again.
Your first question was probably a much better one. I'm sure if you read Simplified Aircraft Design, it will answer a whole lot of questions. You'll still need to get more technical if you actually design something.
 

billygun81

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
15
Location
Henderson, Kentucky
Your first question was probably a much better one. I'm sure if you read Simplified Aircraft Design, it will answer a whole lot of questions. You'll still need to get more technical if you actually design something.
I understand about being more technical in my question, i am asking for general/different scenarios/answers of what determines a aircrafts length and width. Fuselage with and total width wingtip to wingtip.

If i had a more technical question to ask, i probably would have read enough to already have an answer.:)
 

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,800
Location
Wisconsin
I understand about being more technical in my question, i am asking for general/different scenarios/answers of what determines a aircrafts length and width. Fuselage with and total width wingtip to wingtip.

If i had a more technical question to ask, i probably would have read enough to already have an answer.:)
I'm not being a smart azz, but length and width of a design starts at the "purpose" or "mission" of the particular aircraft. Once that happens it's a matter of balance, drag, power, etc.

Every designer clearly defines the mission because airplanes are a giant compromise. You can't even begin designing until you have established that.
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
8,535
Location
USA.
I'm not being a smart azz, but length and width of a design starts at the "purpose" or "mission" of the particular aircraft. Once that happens it's a matter of balance, drag, power, etc.

Every designer clearly defines the mission because airplanes are a giant compromise. You can't even begin designing until you have established that.
Very true, Mission
 

billygun81

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
15
Location
Henderson, Kentucky
I'm not being a smart azz, but length and width of a design starts at the "purpose" or "mission" of the particular aircraft. Once that happens it's a matter of balance, drag, power, etc.

Every designer clearly defines the mission because airplanes are a giant compromise. You can't even begin designing until you have established that.
Oh, I know, I just have questions off the top of my head which I have to ask now before I forget. I am in the process of getting a few books mentioned before, then I can ask more detailed/ technical questions.

I am just trying to get as much information now so when I do start reading, I can kind of already understand a little.

I posted another thread with with the above question and have gotten some lengthy in depth answers that actually I understand about chord, aspect ratio, type and purpose of the aircraft, fuselage etc...

Helps to ask questions now, before I bust out with them when I start reading the books:)
 

billygun81

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
15
Location
Henderson, Kentucky
I'm not being a smart azz, but length and width of a design starts at the "purpose" or "mission" of the particular aircraft. Once that happens it's a matter of balance, drag, power, etc.

Every designer clearly defines the mission because airplanes are a giant compromise. You can't even begin designing until you have established that.
Oh, I know, I just have questions off the top of my head which I have to ask now before I forget. I am in the process of getting a few books mentioned before, then I can ask more detailed/ technical questions.

I am just trying to get as much information now so when I do start reading, I can kind of already understand a little.

I posted another thread with with the above question and have gotten some lengthy in depth answers that actually I understand about chord, aspect ratio, type and purpose of the aircraft, fuselage etc...

Helps to ask questions now, before I bust out with them when I start reading the books:)
 
Top