Crashes in the News - Thread

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gtae07

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Obviously, a sad end for this guy. If there's a silver lining: a steam rocket is a very dangerous thing that inherently has several means to kill a "pilot" in excruciatingly painful ways. If Mike's end was going to happen in this rocket, this is about as peaceful as it could be.
I can't imagine the last few seconds of helplessly plummeting would have been "peaceful". Now, painless, sure.
 

BBerson

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It looked to me that he was ejected at about 50 feet up after liftoff, the parachute opened and then he came down slowly. May have hit his head or something.
 

Vigilant1

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I can't imagine the last few seconds of helplessly plummeting would have been "peaceful". Now, painless, sure.
"about as peaceful as it could be. ". Given the alternatives.
I'm hopeful he blacked out from the acceleration, though I don't know how he was oriented in the rocket. On a previous launch of another one he suffered some spinal compression.
 
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lr27

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I wonder if there were any unmanned test flights first? My guess is no. I would also guess that it's possible to make a relatively low risk, homemade rocket like this that isn't blatantly unsafe. It would require talent and dedication, though.

Wondering if there isn't some practical and legal way to do the first several hours of testing a new homebuilt by radio control. I'm guessing the legal part is the obstacle.
 

Aerowerx

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An article in the paper today about the pilot in the Kobe Bryant helicopter.

He had been slapped on the wrist before, by the FAA, for similar incident.
 

BBerson

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At liftoff, he appears to be hanging below the open chute and lands about 200 feet from the tower.
The rocket then continues on without him up to about 2000 feet agl and then turns downward and hits about a mile away.
 

jedi

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I said regular test pilot, as in amateur, as this guy was. He didn't wish to die is my opinion. But even pros can make fatal mistakes such as the Scaled pilot that pulled the feather knob on launch.
And Evil Knivel that deployed early. Rule # One “Don’t put your band on the eject button till you are ready to go!”.

It looked to me like the chute tore loose, took a lot of energy from the ride, and Mike rode it up and down.
 

bmcj

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It looked to me that he was ejected at about 50 feet up after liftoff, the parachute opened and then he came down slowly. May have hit his head or something.
No, that was just his chute that brings down the pod with him inside. He was still in the rocket after the chute ripped off. Watch the ground crew... he didn’t fully react until he saw the capsule impact.

I wonder if there were any unmanned test flights first? My guess is no. I would also guess that it's possible to make a relatively low risk, homemade rocket like this that isn't blatantly unsafe. It would require talent and dedication, though.

Wondering if there isn't some practical and legal way to do the first several hours of testing a new homebuilt by radio control. I'm guessing the legal part is the obstacle.
Testing with radio control assumes sanity or an agenda where publicity is not the driving concern.

I think there was one unmanned flight when the rocket did an uncommanded launch.
 

Doggzilla

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timberwolf8199

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Many of them are clearly unwell. I’m part of a physics forum and they often come in asking questions that indicate they have mental health issues.
I work with a flat earther. When I first found out, I was excited because I thought similar to bmcj...that is, that he was a conspiracy theorist with whom it would be fun to have some lively debates. It became clear after a very short time that there was more to it than that. He is a true believer and he definitely fits dogzilla's description: a highly intelligent individual who struggles with mental health issues...of which the conspiracy theories are only a symptom. And no this is not just an amateur diagnosis, he is aware of those issues (some/most) and is under treatment for them.
 

bmcj

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I stand corrected about the nature of Flat Earthers. While it is hard for me to understand, there are apparently those out there that truly believe, but how many? Do the true believers seek out the limelight, or is that just someone hijacking the belief for publicity? Do true believers sink their fortunes into building rockets to fly up to 5,000 feet to see the curvature of the Earth when they can get the $69 super saver airline ticket and go to 30,000 feet in comfort?
 

lr27

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Those windows distort the image. ;-)


(Actually, I can't see the curvature from that altitude. OTOH, I've been to California while wearing a watch.)
 

Doggzilla

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I think maybe you may be right. He very well may be doing it for publicity. One of his friends said he was just a very lonely person struggling with finances, who was disappointed his previous stunts had not gotten much attention.
 
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