Crashes in the News - Thread

Discussion in 'Rules and Regulations / Flight Safety / Better Pil' started by choppergirl, Jun 8, 2016.

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes Forum by donating:

  1. Aug 5, 2019 #2521

    SVSUSteve

    SVSUSteve

    SVSUSteve

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2007
    Messages:
    3,854
    Likes Received:
    915
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    I think that went away many years ago (we're talking back when Second Chantz was still the main system). The rumor still goes around though usually espoused by folks, insecure about the size of portions of their anatomy, who see the parachute as an affront to their legendary* stick and rudder skills that will allow them to save the day and brag about it for years to come. :rolleyes:

    *- In their own mind.

     
  2. Aug 5, 2019 #2522

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    4,672
    Likes Received:
    1,635
    Location:
    Upper midwest in a house
    It's only the parachutes made from organic materials that required frequent repacks due to deterioration of the materials. Modern synthetic materials have made it possible for 10 yr repacks.
     
    bmcj likes this.
  3. Aug 5, 2019 #2523

    radfordc

    radfordc

    radfordc

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    1,188
    Likes Received:
    457
    I had one of the very early Second Chantz chutes in the late 90s and even that had a multi-year (5 as I recall) repack interval.
     
  4. Aug 5, 2019 #2524

    Dana

    Dana

    Dana

    Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    8,513
    Likes Received:
    2,924
    Location:
    CT, USA
    Seems like the best system for not nosing over landing on a rough field (or water) is the typical sailplane approach, one wheel half buried in the fuselage with the whole nose of the plane forward of that acting as a skid. Or two wheels, but again with the fuselage close to the ground. Not commonly done on powered planes due to the need for prop clearance, but quite doable with a pylon mounted pusher.

    Radford's Eindecker does look scary in the event of a noseover. A simple rollbar wouldn't be authentic, but it'd be safer. When I crashed my Starduster (still not sure what the exact motions were as it nosed over and cartwheeled as it happened so fast, but one landing gear folded while the other did not.), the top wing and supporting structure no doubt are what kept me unhurt.
     
  5. Aug 5, 2019 #2525

    BBerson

    BBerson

    BBerson

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Messages:
    11,668
    Likes Received:
    2,188
    Location:
    Port Townsend WA
    I watched a 2-22 glider land in 30 foot tall bushes/trees on approach. With no gear to catch and flip, it just settled to a stop and sunk to the ground and the two commercial glider pilots climbed out unhurt but embarrassed for the short landing.
     
  6. Aug 7, 2019 #2526

    jedi

    jedi

    jedi

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Messages:
    1,732
    Likes Received:
    385
    Location:
    Sahuarita Arizona, Renton Washington, USA
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2019
  7. Aug 7, 2019 #2527

    Wanttaja

    Wanttaja

    Wanttaja

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,187
    Likes Received:
    1,350
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Just as a clarification, I believe the aircraft is a Volmer Jensen VJ-22.

    It was pretty big news in Seattle...the owner insisted on removing it from the water immediately, so there was a lot of footage of the plane being pulled through the water by a boat. By the 11 PM news last night, it was out of the water with the wings off.

    There's also video of the crash, no question it had the gear down. Local newsdroids said that the pilot had been having problems with the gear. Might have be an indicator issue showing the gear was still up, but the left gear, at least, should have been perfectly visible from the pilot's seat.

    Ron Wanttaja
     
    jedi likes this.
  8. Aug 7, 2019 #2528

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12,732
    Likes Received:
    4,721
    Location:
    Fresno, California
    Yep, the glider configuration is pretty good at keeping the sunny side up. I’ve landed 2-33’s in rough plowed fields with tall weed without any problems.
     
  9. Aug 7, 2019 #2529

    Wanttaja

    Wanttaja

    Wanttaja

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,187
    Likes Received:
    1,350
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    To him, probably that's true. Cut the dude some slack, the interview I saw, the guy still looked to be in shock, with cuts and bruises on his face.

    Ron Wanttaja
     
    gtae07 likes this.
  10. Aug 7, 2019 #2530

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2014
    Messages:
    2,295
    Likes Received:
    912
    Location:
    Rochester, NY, USA
    The 3rd gen? SeaRey is claimed to have enough bow buoyancy to survive a wheels down water landing without nosing over. It will not however take off from water wheels down. ;)
     
  11. Aug 7, 2019 #2531

    BBerson

    BBerson

    BBerson

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Messages:
    11,668
    Likes Received:
    2,188
    Location:
    Port Townsend WA
    I didn't see the news, but I think that was the beige seaplane I watched flyover on Saturday morning.
    Wheels look like a Volmer.
     
  12. Aug 8, 2019 #2532

    SVSUSteve

    SVSUSteve

    SVSUSteve

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2007
    Messages:
    3,854
    Likes Received:
    915
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    Is that said seriously or was the entire comment sarcasm (well done by the way)?
     
  13. Aug 8, 2019 #2533

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2014
    Messages:
    2,295
    Likes Received:
    912
    Location:
    Rochester, NY, USA
    per Kitplanes magazine article pimping the lovely SeaRey, the #3 version of the hull has been landed wheels down on water without flipping over. The #3 version IIRC has more volume in the bow to take off better, not to resist nose overs, that's a bonus.

    I haven't tried it or seen video of a test, thus "claimed". I have nothing against the plane or designers or Kitplanes. In fact I really like the SeaRey, and the magazine.

    The take off comment was sarcasm.

    Edit... AND CORRECTION!
    I was mistaken, apparently. Here's the article i thought stated the plane had been landed wheels down on water. I cannot find the comment. Also has a better explanation of the A-B & C hulls.

    "By 2001 a further refinement in the hull shape, the “C” version, with a considerably bluffer bow and a double-V step (downward and backward) became the standard that is still in use today. It allows for smoother entry into the water and is much more buoyant in the nose, giving excellent control on the water and with better rough-water capability, while still allowing for tight step-turns."

    https://www.kitplanes.com/searey-lsx/

    So, it was written seriously, and with sarcasm, but now I seems I was wrong, so feel free to laugh. Twice. And thanks for the compliment and the chance to correct an error.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2019
  14. Aug 8, 2019 #2534

    SVSUSteve

    SVSUSteve

    SVSUSteve

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2007
    Messages:
    3,854
    Likes Received:
    915
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    Thanks for the follow-up.
     
  15. Aug 8, 2019 #2535

    wktaylor

    wktaylor

    wktaylor

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2003
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    In the for-what-its-worth category... USN Seaplane water loads...

    MIL-A-8864 Aircraft Strength and Rigidity - Water and Handling Loads for Seaplanes
     
  16. Aug 8, 2019 #2536

    12notes

    12notes

    12notes

    Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Messages:
    797
    Likes Received:
    490
    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    "The pilot told KOMO News he was flying and approaching to land at Dyes Inlet but he said his landing gear was down and he had trouble raising the wheels before he landed."

    No point of Dyers Inlet, where this crash happened, is more than 8 miles from one of two airparks in the area, or more than 12 miles from Bremerton International Airport. There is no reason this landing should have been attempted.

    https://www.google.com/maps/search/airport/@47.5761851,-122.6876247,12z
     
    SVSUSteve and Charles_says like this.
  17. Aug 8, 2019 #2537

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12,732
    Likes Received:
    4,721
    Location:
    Fresno, California
    By making that statement, he is most likely deflecting from pilot error (oversight) to make it seem like a mechanical error.
     
    SVSUSteve likes this.
  18. Aug 8, 2019 #2538

    BBerson

    BBerson

    BBerson

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Messages:
    11,668
    Likes Received:
    2,188
    Location:
    Port Townsend WA
    Maybe his engine quit or had carb ice or something or some other reason for not going around?
     
  19. Aug 8, 2019 #2539

    BJC

    BJC

    BJC

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
    Messages:
    9,334
    Likes Received:
    6,112
    Location:
    97FL, Florida, USA
    Water in the carburetor.


    BJC
     
  20. Aug 8, 2019 #2540

    SVSUSteve

    SVSUSteve

    SVSUSteve

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2007
    Messages:
    3,854
    Likes Received:
    915
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    Thanks for that!
     

Share This Page

arrow_white