Penetrating oil

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by PTAirco, Mar 31, 2008.

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  1. Mar 31, 2008 #1

    PTAirco

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    Does anyone have thoughts on what makes the best penetrating oil for loosening up rusted fasteners, other than WD-40?

    Lots of brands out there, I was just wondering if there is overall, best substance.
     
  2. Apr 1, 2008 #2

    Dana

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    I've had great results with "PB Blaster". The can looks like something out of the 1950's but it works better than anything else I've tried. I replaced the shocks on my truck last month, which have pretty large nuts. Sprayed the stuff on all the nuts the night before and had no trouble at all, even with awkward angles and arthritic hands.

    -Dana

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  3. Apr 1, 2008 #3

    JMillar

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    WD-40 is crap in my opinion... its a decent degreaser for removing packing grease. That's all. The best stuff I've ever used is ZEP-45. And I've used a lot of it, Atlantic Canada winter is not nice on automotive fasteners.

    Wurth also makes a good one, can't remember the name, I'm thinking Sabesto or something like that.... it leaves more of a permanent film than the ZEP though. I use it as one step down from taking something apart and adding anti-seize. By the way, Wurth also makes the best anti-seize, called CU- something, it (as the name implies) seems to be a suspension of copper particles in something.
     
  4. Apr 1, 2008 #4

    expedition2166

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    PB works the best out of most i've seen still availible
    but
    ( ok this is going to sound crazy but bear with me )

    hydrogen peroxide works great and vinager and salt mixed works great too but if none of those will get it bring out the ''blue wrench''
    sometimes fre is the only way
     
  5. Apr 1, 2008 #5

    PTAirco

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    Thanks, I'll try a couple of cans of those brands you mentioned.
     
  6. Apr 1, 2008 #6

    JMillar

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    One more thing, heat is the most amazing thing. If it's something that can be heated to a dull red (always the outside part of course) then that'll beat any penetrating fluid. Or better yet, leave it overnight with the fluid and then heat it in the morning. Oxy-fuel is the way to go, using a propane torch or similar is too slow so the heat travels too far - like HAZ in welding / cutting - hotter processes do less damage.

    Even if there's a lot of aluminum, the aluminum conducts the heat so well that getting a nut red hot often won't damage anything. Really depends what you're dealing with though.
     
  7. Apr 1, 2008 #7

    Midniteoyl

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    PB BLASTER all the way...
     
  8. Apr 1, 2008 #8

    Topaz

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    My dad (now-retired mechanical engineer) has always sworn by a product called "Liquid Wrench". I've seen it work wonders on pulling apart rusted parts. Takes a while to properly soak, however. Not a quick process.
     
  9. Apr 1, 2008 #9

    bmcj

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    I'm surprised no one mentioned Liquid Wrench until now (credit: TOPAZ). I don't know how it compares to the others, but it has always been a popular brand with many, many people. It's still available (made by GUNK, www.gunk.com) and comes in several different grades for different applications.

    Bruce :)
     
  10. Apr 1, 2008 #10

    wally

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    I like Liquid wrench but as others said the PB Blaster is supposed to be really good, maybe better. And a little heat with the liquid wrench will sometimes make the difference. Just enough heat so that the liquid wrench smokes a bit when you squirt it on after warming up the part.

    A gentle touch after you get the nut moving a little will help too. work it back and fourth slowly and add more stuff as you do. I have also seen where running a threading die down the exposed threaded end will help clean off rust and when you do get the nut to move, it will come all the way off.

    If worst comes to worst, a Dremel tool (you've got to get one!) with a little grinding wheel or cutting disc to cut away one side of the nut almost all the way to the threads and then remove it with Vice Grips (wonderfull pliers too!). Oh, go ahead and buy the real Vice Grip pliers, they are worth the money and will last. I have a pair that is 40 years old so far that I use all the time.

    Heat on aluminum cast parts really helps. It does take a lot of heat but like cylinder head exhaust studs, heat will get them out.

    Best wishes,
    Waly
     
  11. Apr 1, 2008 #11

    Dana

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    I used Liquid Wrench for years... until a co-worker told me about PB Blaster. 'Nuff said.

    Kroil (which I've never tried) is also supposed to be very good, but it's only available from industrial distributors.

    -Dana

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  12. Apr 1, 2008 #12

    Topaz

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    Cool. Something new to try! Thanks. :)
     
  13. Apr 1, 2008 #13

    PTAirco

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    I went and bought a can of PB and one of Liquid Wrench - used them on two different Ranger engines that really really, need it, just to see if there is a noticeable difference.
    The subject came up because with rusted nuts on a steel stud in an aluminium crankcase, the stud is likely to come out before the nut comes off, and there are a lot of studs in these!
     
  14. Apr 2, 2008 #14

    jumpinjan

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    Okay, you need penetrating oil to release the fasteners on the Rangers? Are they that rusty? Do you have a spanner for the front bearing?
    (I have two rangers too that I need to restore)
    Jan
    (I used all the penetrants, and I couldn't tell any difference)
     
  15. Apr 2, 2008 #15

    PTAirco

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    The nuts on two of them are fairly bad, one sat outside for quite a while. But I only tried a few so far - I'm sure with some patience I'll get them all out safely. Some are surprisingly easy,others not.

    I don't have a spanner for the front end, but I know someone who made one up, which I will be borrowing.
    What are your engines for?
     
  16. Apr 2, 2008 #16

    jumpinjan

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    They are not going on any projects are this time. I need to go through them, preserve...restore and oil them good and store them untill I might need them.
    Jan
    (I'll probably need to make a spanner. One engine looks like they didn't use one on the front nut)
     
  17. Apr 2, 2008 #17

    PTAirco

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    Yes, people mangle them with screwdrivers or chisels and hammers. Mine seem ok.
     
  18. Dec 10, 2009 #18

    ruptured duck

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    uh huh, i know it's an old thread. but for what it's worth, i recently ran across this and it may be useful to someone.

    Machinist's Workshop magazine actually tested penetrants for break out torque on rusted nuts.
    Significant results! They are below, as forwarded by an ex-student and professional machinist, Bud Baker.
    They arranged a subjective test of all the popular penetrants with the control being the torque
    required to remove the nut from a "scientifically rusted" environment.
    *Penetrating oil ..... Average load*
    None ..................... 516 pounds
    WD-40 .................. 238 pounds
    PB Blaster ............. 214 pounds
    Liquid Wrench ..... 127 pounds
    Kano Kroil ............ 106 pounds
    ATF-Acetone mix....53 pounds
    The ATF-Acetone mix was a "home brew" mix of 50 - 50 automatic transmission fluid and acetone.
    Note the "home brew" was better than any commercial product in this one particular test. Our local
    machinist group mixed up a batch and we all now use it with equally good results. Note also that
    "Liquid Wrench" is about as good as "Kroil" for about 20% of the price.

    and no, i cannot explain what a- "scientifically rusted" environment" is.
     
  19. Dec 10, 2009 #19

    Hot Wings

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    Ran across this in a patent description:

    "In order to test the rust-solubilizing properties of the aforementioned four-component penetrating oil composition a modified ASTM D665-60 Rust was carried out."

    So it seems there is a standard for the process :shock:

    Not interested enough to pay ASTM to see exactly what the standard entails.
     
  20. Dec 10, 2009 #20

    Midniteoyl

    Midniteoyl

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    As far as I can find, ASTM D665-60 is for testingt the corrosion inhibiting properties of an oil... Anyone have the ASTM standards books?

    Cant believe WD-40 and PB tested so close to each other. I've found the difference to be night and day myself. Have to try the actetone/ATF mix.. Did they say which type of ATF? :)
     

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