Crashes in the News - Thread

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bmcj

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what is the biggest cross wind you landed it?
When I lived in Riverside, I used to love to go out when the Santa Ana Winds were blowing (you can look them up… lots of references in Wikipedia, meteorological citations and even popular literature) and practice my crosswind takeoffs and landings, usually in Cubs or Champs, and sometimes in Cessnas or Stearmans or even ulralights.

When the winds blew, they were ALMOST a direct crosswind with just enough angle to change our preferred runway from 24 to 06. The crosswind component was often in the 30-50 mph range and gusting, but the air was crystal clear. You could see fleets of commercial tractor-trailer trucks laying on their side on the nearby freeway. The final 10-30 feet of your descent to landing was in the leeward side of the hangars, trees and terrain, so the wind got a little slower but more turbulent.

Depending on the strength, landings were done with an extreme crab down the runway but with a traverse from the downwind edge to the upwind edge (and even using some of the grass along the edges). The slower planes could even land directly across our narrow runway, but that took away the fun and challenge of landing crosswind. When they were strong, you could even hover a Cessna 150 and do a vertical powered descent to a no-roll touchdown. Actually, there was a bit of a landing roll because the last 20’ or so was in the tree and hangar slowed winds. The last hundred feet of descent also required an aggressive increasing of throttle and AOA because of the ground-induced wind gradient.

I did that often whenever those seasonal winds blew. It was a blast. The landings didn’t scare me, but ground taxiing back to the tie downs did. The ultralight required at least two people on each wing to walk you in.

the other thing that was fun to do in the Santa Ana’s was to take friends up to a safe altitude, usually in a Cessna 150 or 172, because they were faster than the Cubs and Champs, pull the plane up into a powered hover over a spot on the ground, then roll off into a 180° turn to a downwind direction. The sensation when (almost instantly) accelerating from zero ground speed to 150 mph ground speed was amazing.

VB can probably tell you some of his own Santa Ana wind stories.
 
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epc

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Aerolite 103 crashed on pilot's first flight. Wife saw it happenend.


 

bmcj

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I havent seen much about this Long Eze. Near airport?

Depending on options, aiming for a partially built framed structure might have been the smart think to do since it can spread out the impact forces as it breaks boards, but problematic too because it sounds like he might not have been discovered until sometime later when workers arrived.
 

Hephaestus

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Daleandee

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Aerolite 103 crashed on pilot's first flight. Wife saw it happenend.


I know ultralights have no training requirement though they said he had some previous flight experience, and I don't want to sound uncaring but looking at the place where he came down it sure looks like with a little training he could have put it down without getting himself killed.

Of course I'm Monday morning quarterbacking this but at first blush it appears that this was quite preventable. So if you're gonna buy your husband his "dream plane" spend a little more for a few lessons on how to fly the thing.
 

231TC

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This string of incidents ended in my neck of the woods Saturday evening, fortunately only minor injuries:

New owner flying it home from California, had 4 incidents in 8 days, ended up inverted in Lake Michigan, rescued by Coast Guard. Was so close to its new home (about 50 NM) when the final incident happened. Looks like engine failure, turned back toward Beaver Island but couldn't make it. Gear didn't retract properly for water landing (probably due to the recent 3 incidents) so it flipped.

Always heard Seawinds can be tough.
 

Victor Bravo

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VB can probably tell you some of his own Santa Ana wind stories.
Not that many actually.

After I went from flying gliders to flying powered airplanes, some "life stuff" happened that took a lot of my fearlessness and indestructible-ness out. Been looking for it ever since, with no luck. Strong Santa Ana's are a much bigger problem at my home airport because it's only 3 miles from the San Gabriel mountains. So we get the equivalent of wave rotor in the traffic pattern that is downright unpleasant, tossing old Cotter pins and washers from the floor up in front of you.

A strong wind out in flat terrain wouldn't bug me, even the emasculated and antique version of myself that exists now. But getting hit hard up and down vertically I must admit I have lost all tolerance for. It was a lot easier to tolerate in the flexible gliders, but real wave rotor in the Sierra was never a fun thing for me even at 23 years old. Some guys didn't mind it, but I always did. That's why I was a "thermal guy" and not a "wave guy", even being based at the best wave airport.
 

Rhino

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I've moved parts of the taxiways at the airpark here, and some runway areas when covid prevented the airport authority from using their traditional prisoner cleanup crews. But I mounted warning lights on my mower and checked for traffic before every turnaround because I feared something just like that. Strangely enough, or maybe not, I was more concerned for safety of aircraft than I was for my own safety. I also have the only golf cart on the field that has warning lights mounted on it. I think I'm this way because of my years working on Air Force flightlines, and the accompanying emphasis on safety in that environment.
 

Marc W

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A Thatcher CX4 left the runway and turned over. I believe in Canada. Cause was, according to the pilot, "Cross wind gust at the worst possible moment, coupled w/ complacent pilot". Pilot is OK except for cracked ribs and sternum.
 
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Marc W

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Strong Santa Ana's are a much bigger problem at my home airport because it's only 3 miles from the San Gabriel mountains.
Watching other people land at Whiteman during a good Santa Ana used to be a spectator sport when I was flying there in the '80's. Doing it yourself could be exciting! Three windsocks and all pointing different directions. If you could level that hill to the east it would improve the situation.
 

Topaz

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This string of incidents ended in my neck of the woods Saturday evening, fortunately only minor injuries:

New owner flying it home from California, had 4 incidents in 8 days, ended up inverted in Lake Michigan, rescued by Coast Guard. Was so close to its new home (about 50 NM) when the final incident happened. Looks like engine failure, turned back toward Beaver Island but couldn't make it. Gear didn't retract properly for water landing (probably due to the recent 3 incidents) so it flipped.

Always heard Seawinds can be tough.
Well, I guess I won't be seeing it at Brackett (POC) anymore. It's been a common sight over the last few years. This is N8UU, the accident aircraft. What a shame.

IMG_20170917_162502.jpg

The following is included in the comments for the Kathryn's Report website, supposedly by the airport manager at ONL (O'Neill Municipal Airport, Nebraska). Sounds like a bad case of "Get there" combined with someone overly optimistic about their skills in-type. Guy lost $100k on this adventure, no insurance.

I am the airport mgr at KONL..I spent 3 days with this fellow..He landed gear up the day he bought it for 100 plus grand..in CA...Then ran off the runway in NM..wiping out landing lights and left flap..He repaired it..the we were his next stop..5 attempts to land..last one lost it on landing..creamed two runway lights..His story was..Airplane sat for 2 years..when he got to us he had already damaged the hull...I fed him..housed him..and gave him tools and parts..We got his CG corected for his pilot weight..He replaced the trim motor..ad the first was inop..hence the 4 attempts to land..He was way aft..outside the envelope..Luccky to be alive..lucky...His trip to test everything was not much better..his trim was reversed..wiped out right main and brake assembly..Feds talked to him..We advised him to truck the plane..he refused all efforts..Snuck out Saturday..did not pay his bill..made it all the way home..over the lake..his engine quit..He deadsticked it back to a nearby airport..broke the nosewheel.Fixed it again..added fuel..Now ran all the tanks dry..sucked all the fiberglass trash into the fuel system..Took off halfway across the lake..it quit again..Nosegear was locked down..hull was scraped and damaged..lanned dead stick in the lake..nose gear down..Fliped over..lucky to have gotten out. Airplane is at the bottom of Lake MI..Nice guy..bit of a temper..hellbent on gethomeitis...No insurance..lost it all because of god knows why...It was like watching 2 trains heading towards one another..nothing you could do..Even the FAA..after verifying his credentials and barely current currency.They.said to let..him go..Sad day indeed..
KathrynsReport.jpg
 
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231TC

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Well, I guess I won't be seeing it at Brackett (POC) anymore. It's been a common sight over the last few years. This is N8UU, the accident aircraft. What a shame.

View attachment 112798

The following is included in the comments for the Kathryn's Report website, supposedly by the airport manager at ONL (O'Neill Municipal Airport, Nebraska). Sounds like a bad case of "Get there" combined with someone overly optimistic about their skills in-type. Guy lost $100k on this adventure, no insurance.



View attachment 112799
Lynn Swann who built it posted this on his Barnstormers listing for the plane, pretty much same story:
seawind.png


Darn shame. I had my eye on a Seawind for a while, but everyone told me I'd kill myself in it so I decided against it. Hard to get insurance on them, too. Figured Dennis would be out of pocket on the loss. It's probably about 350 feet underwater now.
 

proppastie

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what I do not understand was how a flying aircraft could be so "aft-CG" .....was the first owner very big and the second very small......".He was way aft..outside the envelope..Luccky to be alive..lucky.. "

not salt water.....might be salvageable
 

TFF

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If CG is an issue, remember the load trends backwards from a regular front engine plane. One person is aft CG so it’s at its most touchy, 4 people would have CG forward like one or two people in a front engine plane. Might have been a surprise it did not act like a Cessna. I know a few professional pilots that are too light for certain airplanes solo and have ballast at the ready.
 

BBerson

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Just look at the side view and see the engine in the back. Probably needed a large amount of front ballast.
Does it have a minimum pilot weight placard on the panel?
 
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