Crashes in the News - Thread

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Tiger Tim

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4 incidents in 8 days... Looks like engine failure... Always heard Seawinds can be tough.
A week worth of gear and electrical issues followed by the engine quitting with what sounds like gear in transit; I wonder if the cause was anything like Elliot Seguin’s T-51 engine failure where stuck gear caused an overloaded hydraulic power pack to blow a main breaker. The Seawind may not have had an electrically-dependent engine installed (though maybe it did), but I imagine electric boost pumps are the only way to get fuel up to the high mounted engine...
 

Topaz

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so the first pilot might have been big and the second small.
Or the original owner often flew with a passenger(s), and the new owner was flying solo, and didn't ballast the airplane. Something like this with that much variable load forward is likely to need ballast between full and minimum payload conditions. We have Seawind owners here on the board. Does the aircraft normally require ballast if flown solo?
 

Rhino

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$25 thousand a flight... Ouch
Hey, this is America. He'll just sue somebody to get his money back.

Looking at the stuff from the airport manager, maybe the guy should have been on suicide watch or something. He seemed bound and determined to continually push a bad situation til it bit him in the butt.

Better to retire and save your aircraft, than push a bad position.
Tom Skerritt - Top Gun
 

Richard6

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737 down in water off Honalulu,pilots rescued
OK don't know a lot about jet engines, it was my understanding that they keep running as long as they had fuel or one of the blades flew off of the engine.

From what I read, neither of these things happened. So why does a jet engine just quit?

And I also was led to believe that these twin engine jet powered aircraft could maintain altitude with one engine. So what happened ?

How does a jet engine "overheat" ?

Richard
 

Rhino

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The JT8D has history of overheating. In 1985 one caught fire at Manchester airport in England and killed 54 people. Combustion chamber deterioration was supposedly the cause (I don't know the final determination). It's an old engine, so it's not hard to imagine deterioration causing stuff like this.
 

D Hillberg

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OK don't know a lot about jet engines, it was my understanding that they keep running as long as they had fuel or one of the blades flew off of the engine.

From what I read, neither of these things happened. So why does a jet engine just quit?

And I also was led to believe that these twin engine jet powered aircraft could maintain altitude with one engine. So what happened ?

How does a jet engine "overheat" ?

Richard
Two very tired engines - one quits the other just couldn't take the added load.... So it quit too.
 

Richard Roller

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The JT8D has history of overheating. In 1985 one caught fire at Manchester airport in England and killed 54 people. Combustion chamber deterioration was supposedly the cause (I don't know the final determination). It's an old engine, so it's not hard to imagine deterioration causing stuff like this.
The Manchester incident was caused by combustion chambers bursting due to maintenance practices of the day. I started at TWA in '86 and got caught up in the revised maintenance procedures for the cans in the JT8D engines.
 

TFF

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I bet JT8s are not even overhauled anymore. Probably a big stack of engines from salvage and as one goes down, another used one gets bolted on out of a can.
 

Vigilant1

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Post 4429 above says it. Reduced power takeoffs can work against safety and aggravate the problem by encouraging failures at the worst possible time.
I can see how that could happen.
If the operator/airline procedures call for routine reduced power takoffs, maybe the planes should be limited to a MTOW at which it could still fly safely on remaining engines at that same reduced EPR. Sure, if the crew NEEDs to firewall the remaining engines to get safely to a landing, they should do it. But it seems not quite right to build the system so that the old creaky motors are seeing unusual EPR when the chips are down.
 
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Richard6

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So if I understand this discussion properly, the FAA has different rules for jet aircraft that don't carry passengers as opposed to those that do. Seems like a disaster waiting to happen. This time the aircraft operator got lucky, next time the crash could be into a populated area with disastrous results.
 

dwalker

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Crash in my neighborhood this morning-


adsb data here-


Looks like he aborted a landing, had power on the downwind, turned base, made a good landing but went off the field into the road.

I do not know the fellow that owns it.
 
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