Crashes in the News - Thread

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gtae07

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Rhino

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He never got close to the end of the runway. Left the ground and pulled up into an almost immediate stall.
 

Hephaestus

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He never got close to the end of the runway. Left the ground and pulled up into an almost immediate stall.
Never sat in a marchetti - is this possibly that seat slideback scenario thats been mentioned from time to time?
 

Rhino

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Haven't heard any details. Just saw the video.
 

TFF

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A couple of people have thought it might be a seat track as the plane is essentially an updated turbine Cessna Birddog. Some also put out control lock/ blockage/ slack preflight. With everything from loose luggage to belts wrapped around the rear stick. I did not listen to the ATC tape, but from others, it sounds like he knew his mistake right before the end.
 

Rhino

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Somebody was screaming. I wasn't sure if it was him.
 

Voidhawk9

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As Juan Brown noted, as it goes head-on to the camera, the ailerons appear to be perfectly neutral - which is odd in this situation unless the controls are somehow locked.
 

Saville

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If it was a seat slideback, you might see a more abrupt pitch up. This seemed a smooth pitch up
 

WBNH

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In Dan Gryder's vid, he half-heartedly speculates...maybe seat slide, but he'd bet more likely interference with the controls, something that likely could have been discovered with a good preflight. His speculation, not mine. But he further speculates that Maybe, Maybe, a piece of camping gear stowed in the backseat might have fallen and jammed the controls in full up elevator right after takeoff. He thought there may have been a canvas boot missing from the rear seat stick base in a photo he'd seen of the plane before...

Imagining: Could something a simple as a leatherman fall out of a backpack pocket and jam the controls after getting jostled during take-off? Scary thought.

Incidentally, a few years back, I was at our local airfield at the time of a very similar incident...one in which the local instructors strongly suspected a seat slide, but the NTSB didn't agree. Not that they came up with anything better. Cessna 180, N6510A: Fatal accident occurred September 01, 2014 in North Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire
 
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Tiger Tim

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Could something a simple as a leatherman fall out of a backpack pocket and jam the controls after getting jostled during take-off? Scary thought.
If you want to get into that sort of scenario it could be something as stupid as a lost pen bouncing around under the floorboards for the last six months, there’s just no telling what may be waiting to jam controls. A friend of mine won’t let a pen come anywhere near his airplanes for exactly that reason; his theory is that if a stray pencil jams something in flight you can probably reef hard enough on the controls to snap or at least crush it but a pen could be a lot less forgiving.

Coincidentally, last week I had a flap jam on the work plane and it turned out to be some tool that was left in there on the last major inspection. FOD sucks and it can live in places that you’ll never, ever look on a pre-flight inspection.
 

Voidhawk9

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In NZ a few years ago, a tool was left inside the airframe of a Yak-52 after maintenance. On the following flight it slid aft after take-off, jamming the elevator. The aircraft descended rapidly into a park (not far from houses) killing both on board.
FOD kills. I am sure there are many other similar stories.

Also raises a design consiuderation for those of us that way inclined - try to avoid building spaces in which FOD can jam the controls, install covers around places where things could slip into critical areas, etc.
 

Richard6

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Bad News:

Apparently the aircraft lost some of it's control surfaces while in flight.

Here is the flight tracker info:

Here is a video of the impact:

Screen shot from the video.
1628485049026.png

Here is a zoomed-in photo of a screen shot of the video:
1628485169311.png
It appears that both wings are folded up and the horizontal tail section is missing.
 
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Tiger Tim

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Yikes. I had always heard that Mooney wings were almost impossibly strong and that you’d have to practically fly through a tornado to break them.
 

Vigilant1

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Bad News:

Apparently the aircraft lost some of it's control surfaces while in flight.
A very sad one.

Audio of the pilot/tower comms before the crash. There were noted altitude deviations, but no verbal indication of control problems or structural damage. Pilot does appear to be distracted/inattentive to the radio (which might be totally appropriate).

Disregard the visuals on this Flight Sim/YouTube production, but the audio is apparently legit.

 
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Turd Ferguson

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Yikes. I had always heard that Mooney wings were almost impossibly strong and that you’d have to practically fly through a tornado to break them.
The "wing" on a Mooney is one piece from tip to tip. The spar is one solid piece when assembled. Can't remove the left wing and right wing separately. This is what it looks like under assembly:

mooneywing.JPG

Many years ago I was in the Mooney factory. They had a Mooney wing in a similar fixture that had been removed from a plane where the spar had been bent. The story was a pilot was ferrying a brand new plane to it's owner and - you guessed it, flew through a severe thunderstorm. The plane reportedly pulled out with the airspeed indicator wrapped around the peg and landed safely.

If the plane in the picture has pulled enough g's to break the wings, the occupants are likely already unconscious, if not dead.
 
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Richard6

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The "wing" on a Mooney is one piece from tip to tip. The spar is one solid piece when assembled. Can't remove the left wing and right wing separately. This is what it looks like under assembly:

View attachment 114089

Many years ago I was in the Mooney factory. They had a Mooney wing in a similar fixture that had been removed from a plane where the spar had been bent. The story was a pilot was ferrying a brand new plane to it's owner and - you guessed it, flew through a severe thunderstorm. The plane reportedly pulled out with the airspeed indicator wrapped around the peg and landed safely.

If the plane in the picture has pulled enough g's to break the wings, the occupants are likely already unconscious, if not dead.
I viewed the flight tracking and it shows no excessive speed. If one does not exceed VNE, can you still break the wings ?

I agree with you thought about the plains pilot and passengers already passed out from the G-forces.

Also note the wisp of something streaming from the aircraft just be for impact. I'm guessing it's fuel leaking from the ruptured wing tanks.
 
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