Crashes in the News - Thread

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

Toobuilder

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2010
Messages
4,714
Location
Mojave, Ca
I've known a version of that joke from a young age. As told to me in the early 1970's, the first two things were a bit more "colorful", but the last was the familiar "... And a doctor in a Beechcraft Bonanza..."
 

12notes

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2014
Messages
1,039
Location
Louisville, KY

"Regarding engine 4, to prevent the magneto “P” leads from separating from the magnetos, someone had attempted to rig the magneto leads in place with safety wire. Inspection and testing of engine 4 left magneto revealed the movement of the safety-wired lead caused grounding to the case, which rendered the magneto lead inoperative. In addition, the right magneto of engine 4 was found unserviceable. The cam follower was worn beyond limits and the point gap was less than half the measurement required by service documents. When tested, the magneto produced weak or no spark to four of the nine cylinders. All spark plugs were inspected and required cleaning and all electrode gaps were out of tolerance; therefore, further engine inspection indicated signs of detonation and associated damage. An inspection of engine 3 showed all spark plugs electrode gaps were out of tolerance, fouled, and revealed various signs of detonation. Further inspection of this engine revealed problems with the cylinders. As a result of these findings and other information, the FAA questions whether the engines were inspected adequately and in accordance with the applicable maintenance requirements."

Crew chief on the flight wasn't trained, also unaware of Collings own safety manuals existed, discrepancies in the maintenance logs, etc. Unlikely Collings Foundation will ever be able to give rides again.
 
Last edited:

Turd Ferguson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2008
Messages
5,035
Location
Upper midwest in a house
Seems Collings Foundation didn't take safety seriously and will never carry passengers again. So it it just them?
 

steveair2

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2007
Messages
982
Location
Dallas Texas
Hello group. I'm asking for prayers for our EAA chapter 280 president Jim Ireland. Jim died a few hours ago test flying a recently completed Falconar P51 replica.
The airplane was powered by a Chevy LS V8 and apparently lost power and spun in with full fuel. All I know is they had issues last week with the ECU rev limiter and we suspect that may be the cause.
Jim was a great guy, I'm all shook up and will not say much more except for please be careful, and please say a prayer for Jim.

Thanks,
Steve
 

cvairwerks

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
208
Location
North Texas
Steve: I know the name, but I’ve been away from 280 since right before they moved off the farm. Is Jim wearing a yellow shirt in a number of the facebook photos?
 

Erik Snyman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2019
Messages
53
Hello group. I'm asking for prayers for our EAA chapter 280 president Jim Ireland. Jim died a few hours ago test flying a recently completed Falconar P51 replica.
The airplane was powered by a Chevy LS V8 and apparently lost power and spun in with full fuel. All I know is they had issues last week with the ECU rev limiter and we suspect that may be the cause.
Jim was a great guy, I'm all shook up and will not say much more except for please be careful, and please say a prayer for Jim.

Thanks,
Steve
Terrible news. Please accept my condolences to his family and friends.
Erik in Oz.
 

Mike Stewart

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2010
Messages
74
Location
San Diego, CA
Didn't know him nor the plane but you have my empathy on this. It always leaves those who knew him and many who didn't with a strange sense of emptiness and loss, along with (usually) an acute interest in just how the thing happened. Hopefully you'll keep us updated with whatever news there is that perhaps we can learn something from.
 

steveair2

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2007
Messages
982
Location
Dallas Texas
Thanks guys, Yes, Jim usually wore a yellow chapter 280 t shirt.
I suspect that since he was downwind for the active he tried to turn base.
 

cvairwerks

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
208
Location
North Texas
Thanks Steve. Jim had poked at me a time or two to come over and talk about my AT-21 restoration to the chapter at some point.
 

steveair2

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2007
Messages
982
Location
Dallas Texas
I was wrong with my Monday morning speculation. Jim took off to the north and lost power during a right turn out.
Wings rocked and he regained control with nose down attitude, he didn’t have enough altitude to recover.
 

TXFlyGuy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2012
Messages
1,733
Location
Republic of Texas
I was wrong with my Monday morning speculation. Jim took off to the north and lost power during a right turn out.
Wings rocked and he regained control with nose down attitude, he didn’t have enough altitude to recover.
It has been discussed here before, always have a plan for when the engine quits after takeoff. The outcome most often is better landing straight ahead. And like Bob Hoover said..."Fly the plane all the way through the crash."

My formation flight instructor is very big on this, always stressing the importance of having a plan.
Also a friend who owns/flies a P-51 has stressed this to me on more than one occasion.

I am not passing any judgement on anyone's piloting skills, alive or deceased. Just something to keep in the back of your head. And in the forefront of your thought process.

Again, very sorry to learn of this accident. My condolences to the families affected.
 
Last edited:

lr27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2007
Messages
3,822
I've seen a surgeon try to kill himself and his family in a Lake Amphibian. Or, at least, I assume it's dangerous to land when it's rough enough to hide the entire aircraft in a cloud if spray. Then there were the low passes downwind of a high obstacle in a strong breeze. He could have landed a mile away in smooth water and taxied over.

Then there's the floatplane I saw doing a six or seven turn spin, using most of his altitude. I'm not sure, but I think it was a Taylorcraft belonging to a certain captain of industry.
 

phantom59

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
1
Location
Echuca Victoria, Australia
If one person learns a lesson from an accident, and at a point in the future survives because of it, then the death has some meaning.

I'll admit that many folks discuss accidents out of morbid curiosity or the desire to gossip, but feel there's often value in discussing accidents anyway.

Ron Wanttaja
Good morning Ron, I have been following a lot of your work on this forum and I am in awe of your knowledge and experience! You are quite right here, as a retired ATC and a private pilot I am fully aware that I will not live long enough to make all the mistakes that generations of pilots before me have made therefore, I have to learn from their errors and ensure I don't copy them whilst trying my hardest to NOT add to the data set anything I can make up!
I particularly liked you forum posts on crash analysis / statistics; very well done.
Cheers,
Shane.
 
2
Top