Yuneec Electric Aircraft at KCMA

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by Tom Nalevanko, Jul 20, 2009.

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  1. Nov 18, 2009 #21

    PTAirco

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    This really puts things into perspective to those who claim that the age of electric flight has arrived.

    Regarding point 7 - I propose to fix that problem by installing a kerosene fuelled stove behind the seats....
     
  2. Nov 18, 2009 #22

    Topaz

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    Arrived? No. But the Wrights only flew 120' the first time.

    One step at a time.
     
  3. Nov 18, 2009 #23

    bmcj

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    Very good point....

    Design release 2 - jettisonable batteries (with an EPA approved collection ship flying below to catch the spent batteries). :gig:
     
  4. Nov 18, 2009 #24

    Mac790

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    Please don't tell me that you believe in Global Warming.
    For me at the moment it's only an expensive and unpractical toy. I would probably have much more beliefs in biofuel than in electric planes.
    Another option is hydrogen fuel, special for cars, but it would be a little bit problematic to use cryogenic fuel tanks in planes. Those tanks, are a little bit heavy, but it's not the only reason.
    Like I said year or two ago, electric engines are good for self-launch gliders.


    Seb
     
  5. Nov 18, 2009 #25

    bmcj

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    No, but we believe in unjustified environmental fines. :gig:
     
  6. Nov 18, 2009 #26

    Mac790

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    The funny story is, that they usualy show charts similar to pic 1, but it's much harder to find charts similar to pic 2, current period is very similar to 500-600AD period, I bet that they had a lot of cars back then:gig:

    Seb
     

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  7. Nov 19, 2009 #27

    Inverted Vantage

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    Electric aircraft are simply not going to happen anytime soon - 10 to 20 years, yea, but right now e simply don't have the battery technology. There are programs in development to rectify this, but they're going to be hitting the market in 5 years - at the earliest. And even then it's going to take another 5 to 10 years for it to trickle down to anything even remotely useful to consumers.

    If you want to invest in a future technology for aircraft, invest in low-cost renewable energy; bioful from crops (ethanol and the like) is useless; it's a bad decision all around. It takes up food area, it's not that much better than gas in terms of price, etc etc. What you really want to go for is algae-based biofuels.

    Beyond that there's other alternatives still; most will require substantial modifications to engines however, and the fuel will have to become widespread. If you've got the brains, balls, and capital to do it though, you could probably make a real killing.
     
  8. Nov 19, 2009 #28

    autoreply

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    I think my opinion about the impossibility of realistic performing electric aircraft are clear enough. Please note the flight time that's not the advertised 2 hrs, but 1 hr, in their analyzes they're forgetting the climb which consumes a considerable amount of power.

    This is btw the report Tom was referring to.

    I recall myself explaining why you won't fly much longer than that (fundamental limits of batteries) :ermm:

    As for the Voyager remark, I don't think that's too interesting, because it's a single design-point aircraft.
    Completely filling the Voyager with state-of-the art batteries and removing all fuel related stuff plus engines the Voyager will have a range of 450-500 km's or around 300 miles. The theoretical battery capacity limit is 3 times that, so in an ideal world that Voyager could fly max 900 miles..

    Topaz convinced me too about this. Pressurized H2 however does work and is applied in public transportation and some experimental cars. It has none of the problems cryogenic fuel has, except for the daily leakage of a percent or two of the fuel.


    And they might be for training aircraft that can just regenerative braking and have very short flight times (simply put a fresh charged battery in after 30 minutes)
     
  9. Nov 19, 2009 #29

    Mac790

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  10. Nov 19, 2009 #30

    bmcj

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    I only meant the Voyager concept as a thought experiment. It would not be the "answer" to a realistic electric aircraft for everyone (or even one).
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2009
  11. Jun 2, 2012 #31

    topspeed100

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    I agree 100%.

    Why was it's operating altitude only 2850 meters ?

    Rutan Voyager - Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

    Solar Impuls flew with constant 6 hp at 12 000 meters at 70 + km/h and weighed more than Voyager on tanks nearly empty.
     

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