Work rules / practices

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by BJC, Mar 21, 2016.

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  1. Jun 16, 2018 #121

    pictsidhe

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    I love shelves, but they get piled high. One storage system that I experimented with was to screw jamjar lids to the front underside of a shelf for small fiddly parts in jars that screw into the lids. It was great for the small fiddlies, but hampered shelf access. If I get the wall space, I might try dedicated jar-shelves. I'd be too tempted to squeeze other bits amid loose jars.
     
  2. Jun 17, 2018 #122

    BJC

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  3. Jun 17, 2018 #123

    Hot Wings

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    Nice collection of pictures suitable for training!
     
  4. Jun 18, 2018 #124

    Twodeaddogs

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    My current pet hate is rivet scrap. I have been working on a Zenair 601 owned by a pensioner, with some friends. I am ashamed to say that this aircraft has already flown, on my signature, and now, four years later, we are working on it to get it fit for flight again, after a hiatus and we are finding rivet scrap in corners and in wings and under things that we should have copped years ago. My normal policy is to get a friend to do a "Loose Articles" check, independent of me, of the entire aircraft, top to bottom, nose to tail. I swear, before this aircraft flies again, it will be pristine inside!!
     
  5. Jun 18, 2018 #125

    TFF

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    I use to find that stuff in airliners, from the manufacturer and company repairs. Some just better than others.
     
  6. Jul 4, 2018 #126

    Tench745

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    I'm still really new to this, but one thing I did was take pictures of each sheet of my plans. That way when I'm ordering materials or figuring something out in CAD I can refer to the pictures without dragging the plans out again. I also put the isometric drawings of fuselage and wing in poster frames on the wall as inspiration and as quick reference for how various parts I'm building intersect others.
     
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  7. Jul 5, 2018 #127

    MadRocketScientist

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    A good vacuum cleaner will pick up all sorts of things out of hard to reach corners!
     
  8. Jul 5, 2018 #128

    BJC

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    I’ve heard of strapping a spare alternator belt behind the starter ring gear to make a replacement easy, especially when away from home.

    Has anyone here done that? How did you fasten it down? When you needed it, was it in reasonably good condition? The engine is a Lycoming IO-360.

    Thanks,


    BJC
     
  9. Jul 5, 2018 #129

    Marc Bourget

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    I picked up a new C-172 at the factory in '78. Pre-flight resulted in a double handful of rivets, washers, nuts and bolts. - and I didn't get it all!

    As for extra alternator belt, The one I recall was wrapped/taped in plastic to reduce weatherization and secured with zip ties.
     
  10. Jul 5, 2018 #130

    TFF

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    I have seen zip ties and safety wire. I have never pulled one loose to use, but its got to be better than the one that broke and left you stranded. I see it a lot on Pipers with AC and such where it is an ordeal to get going again. Its always about how hard is it to pull the prop and nose bowl. Just having one as a spare is a coup, even if in the baggage. Brake piston o-rings is another smart one to carry. You would not believe how hard those are to find at Oshkosh the day you want to leave, much less trying not to wreck your plane.
     
  11. Sep 7, 2018 #131

    Twodeaddogs

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    the spare belt is pulled back, so that it lies on the crankcase and is tied to the lifting eye with tie-wraps. When you need to use it, simply pull away the old one and cut the tie-wraps and slide the new belt forwards and onto the starter ring. Anytime I've seen it done, the belt was in usable condition.
     
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  12. Sep 7, 2018 #132

    Mad MAC

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    There is also the new aircraft with nice white clecos or the 20 year old twin with a undriven rivet in the spar (find that fixed one of the fuel leaks).
     
  13. Sep 7, 2018 #133

    wsimpso1

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    Been doing this since 1994 with our Archer II, O360-A4M. It is routed under the crank seal, double zip-tied to the lift ring on the top of the crankcase, and double zip-tied to itself in enough places to keep it from flopping about. We have always considered it "get home insurance" for a failure a couple hours from home. Plan has always been, if it is ever needed, to replace it when we get home. The spare always seems to be in good shape, and we have never needed one to work, but our FBO does this for many of their customers and all of their rental airplanes. They have had airplanes need to use them.

    Billski
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2018
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  14. Sep 7, 2018 #134

    BJC

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    Thanks to all for responding. It has always seemed like cheap insurance, but I wondered how the belts held up in that environment.


    BJC
     
  15. Sep 7, 2018 #135

    gtae07

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    I have seen that done before on a couple of RVs. I've also heard it suggested to use those twist-together belts and you can store them in your flyaway kit (https://www.mcmaster.com/#6173K38). I wouldn't use one for normal ops but it will get you home...

    I've read a couple of "what's left you stranded" threads and a few other things I'm planning to keep on hand, though some of it I'd only carry on trips:
    Spare fuel drain valve (or a suitable plug)
    Spare fuel cap
    Any tools required to remove wheel pants, cowling, other access panels
    Specialty screwdriver bits (if required)
    Speed tape
    Battery charger, jumper cables, or other means of recharging a dead battery (for trips)
    Safety wire
    Spare o-rings (for fuel drain, brake system, etc)
    A couple of spare screws in case some get lost/dropped during the field-expedient repairs
    Electronic versions of plans, parts lists, manuals, etc. for all equipment on the aircraft, including your individual wiring diagrams and such



    Also considering:
    A couple feet of spare wire, plus a couple of splices/pins and a crimper (since I have a lot of electronics and an electrically-dependent engine), again for trips. And maybe a bit of F4 tape too.





    I know of transport-category jets where that was found after having crossed an ocean or three :shock:
     
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  16. Sep 15, 2018 #136

    cvairwerks

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    We strive for not leaving any FOD in the airplane, but being it's built and inspected by humans, sometimes it gets missed. Occasionally it gets there by design. We aren't going to rip an entire wing skin off to recover a drilled out rivet tail...we capture seal it in place and go on.
    Over the years, I've used a borescope with a working channel and remote tools to recover FOD in some pretty inaccessible places. 9 feet of scope and I'm capturing stuff another foot out from the tip....
     

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