Windows 10???

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skier

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There is some software that doesn't do Linux
This^^

If I were just using it for internet browsing, minor text editing, and a little programming, I'd do Linux in a heartbeat. Since I use it for photo editing, some gaming, and CAD, I'm stuck with Windows.
 

clanon

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My old computer (Windows 7) greeted me with the message "Hard drive failure imminent" a couple of weeks ago.
It means the SMART system on the HDD is a narc and it's telling W7 that is really tired of working.But it could be running years this way.You could also get to the disk from the bios setup (usually F2 or Delete keys before start of w7) and when inside the HDD settings just DISABLE SMART , you'll have auto ; enable and disable options when you get into HDD settings) Usually in the first tab of the BIOS settings.
 

bmcj

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Ghost your hard drive before upgrading. If you don't like the results, then you can restore your old system.

(Make sure you understand what "ghosting" means before you do this.)
 
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Manticore

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It means the SMART system on the HDD is a narc and it's telling W7 that is really tired of working.But it could be running years this way.You could also get to the disk from the bios setup (usually F2 or Delete keys before start of w7) and when inside the HDD settings just DISABLE SMART , you'll have auto ; enable and disable options when you get into HDD settings) Usually in the first tab of the BIOS settings.
Don't do this! 'Hard drive failure imminent.' Is a Windows euphemism for a smart error message that should read something like 'This drive is going to die within 24 hours.' 50% of the time it is already too late to recover your data. (Unless you pay a small fortune to have it stripped down in a clean room environment - even then, they can only get it all back if it's head or bearing damage. If it's the disk surface then recovery is problematic.)
 
M

Manticore

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This^^

If I were just using it for internet browsing, minor text editing, and a little programming, I'd do Linux in a heartbeat. Since I use it for photo editing, some gaming, and CAD, I'm stuck with Windows.
Don't know about games but for graphics work GIMP has been better than Photoshop for many years now.
A few examples for CAD:
3D - FreeCAD, VariCAD(non-free). Bricscad(non-free).
2D - Draftsight, LibreCAD, Medusa.
 
M

Manticore

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I'm going back to UBUNTU (Linux) as soon as my son (was a computer expert in the Army) can re-install it for me... I had it for awhile but messed it up with anew internet service. It is GREAT!!!! I really miss it and can't stand any windows.
And it *is* rather amusing to watch Micro$oft scuttling along 5 or 10 years behind. I'm pretty sure there's some bits still left over from DOS in there somewhere ;^}
(I use SUSE Tumbleweed so UBUNTU is also a bit dated from my viewpoint.)
 

Topaz

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Don't know about games but for graphics work GIMP has been better than Photoshop for many years now.
Speaking from the point of view of someone doing commercial graphics professionally for the last 25 years, no, it's not. GIMP has some nice features, but the UI is arcane and Photoshop is simply the far better tool when you actually have to make a living off the work.

I have nothing against Linux, but Adobe doesn't publish for that platform and I make my living using Adobe's tools. Linux isn't an option for me on my workstations. My Linux flavor of choice is Google's implementation of Android, which is perfectly fine for the kind of internet browsing/e-mail/light word-processing being talked about here. Most of the text in my Conceptual Design thread was typed up in Google Docs on my Nexus 7 tablet with a Bluetooth keyboard, for example. It's easier to cart around than a laptop, and I was able to do most of that work sitting in a local restaurant over breakfast or lunch. Was just doing more of that work this morning, as a matter of fact.
 
M

Manticore

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Double post - the network glitched just as I sent it - always get problems at the start of the rainy season.
 

PTAirco

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Don't do this! 'Hard drive failure imminent.' Is a Windows euphemism for a smart error message that should read something like 'This drive is going to die within 24 hours.' 50% of the time it is already too late to recover your data. (Unless you pay a small fortune to have it stripped down in a clean room environment - even then, they can only get it all back if it's head or bearing damage. If it's the disk surface then recovery is problematic.)
When I got that message, I was still able to run it in safe mode and I had all my data backed up on my second hard drive anyway. I think it was physically worn out, after 6 years or so. I still have it and will simply put my old back-up hard drive into and it will become my workshop computer.
 
M

Manticore

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What is this windows thing you speak of ;)
It's an incompetently programmed, monstrously bloated attempted copy of some gimmicky stuff that UNIX based systems were trying around 2000.
 
M

Manticore

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When I got that message, I was still able to run it in safe mode and I had all my data backed up on my second hard drive anyway. I think it was physically worn out, after 6 years or so. I still have it and will simply put my old back-up hard drive into and it will become my workshop computer.
6 years is not bad. We normally assume a half life of 5 years - so 50% should still be running after that time. Unfortunately the failure rate line is not linear - new drives tend to either die almost immediately or carry on until either the bearings wear out or the bad sector count exceeds the number of spare sectors provided.
Above a certain error count, the disk may totally refuse to work even if it is not damaged - this sometimes happens when a laptop overheats - the sensors in the drive detect the heat and register it as a series of errors. Sometimes it is still possible to recover the data at this point by replacing the drive board, but the replacement has to be absolutely identical.
 

clanon

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I've found that the new drives (after 2005 and more than 100gb) failing in about a year of intense use...lately.
But i also find every week some old (a 100GB and under that size) working nice , even being beyond 5 or more years old...:ponder:
PS: "oh... the good ol days of everlasting stuff"
 

Topaz

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It's an incompetently programmed, monstrously bloated attempted copy of some gimmicky stuff that UNIX based systems were trying around 2000.
This thread is getting off-topic for itself, and has always been OT for HBA. Let's keep it tight to the OP's original question and not descend into the OS Holy Wars, please.
 
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