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Starman

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[video=youtube_share;g3zAZpWFsuU]http://youtu.be/g3zAZpWFsuU[/video]

But it's a lot nicer if you turn the sound of on that one and listen to the music on this one

[video=youtube_share;n5AVJV-9C6s]http://youtu.be/n5AVJV-9C6s[/video]
 

Dana

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It's been done, with very small sailplanes that are on the border of hang glider size... but it's a niche thing. R/Cers do it all the time.

Dana

Money does not buy happiness. But poverty really sucks.
 

Dana

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Cool music match! I was going to delete what I took to be a porn link until I saw the note between the videos.

Wind gradient has a significant effect on a powered paraglider, since the motor is so far below the wing that they can be in different wind speeds. Near the ground (where the gradient is largest) it takes significantly more power to fly downwind than upwind.

I don't know if an unpowered paraglider can carry enough momentum to exploit a gradient for dynamic soaring... I doubt it.

Dana

Space isn't remote at all. It's only an hours drive away if your car could go straight upwards.
 

bmcj

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Wind gradient has a significant effect on a powered paraglider, since the motor is so far below the wing that they can be in different wind speeds. Near the ground (where the gradient is largest) it takes significantly more power to fly downwind than upwind.
Interesting. I had never thought of that before.
 

Jay Kempf

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Isn't there a lot of wind gradient on the lee side of a mountain? It might be possible to fly up from Arizona to Washington (un-powered) if you stay on the lee side of the Sierra.
Yeah but the windward side is easier and more direct. Ridge soaring requires very little training and 3 dimensional accuracy. Just follow the ridge and stay in the upwind zone slightly forward and above the ridge. Very exciting way to fly without an engine. Wave soaring is down wind of the peak and very similar. Each standing wave provides a virtual mountain peak to soar off of. Dynamic soaring is a very esoteric method of extracting energy from a surface to altitude wind speed gradient. It is exploitable but tricky.
 

Dana

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How true. But with dynamic soaring, you gain a bit more speed from each cycle and eventually you might go supersonic. :gig:
You can only gain speed while the energy gained during each cycle exceeds the energy lost to drag, which increase as speed increases.

Dana

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Dana

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How true. But with dynamic soaring, you gain a bit more speed from each cycle and eventually you might go supersonic. :gig:
You can only gain speed while the energy gained during each cycle exceeds the energy lost to drag, which increase as speed increases.

Dana

NSA: The only part of government that actually listens.
 

Pops

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On time after a strong frontal passage in the first week of April, with reported winds on the ground running 30-35 knots from the NW, I ridge soared a 1959 Cessna 172 from Sellingrove Pa. to Morgantown WV. Dan
 

bmcj

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On time after a strong frontal passage in the first week of April, with reported winds on the ground running 30-35 knots from the NW, I ridge soared a 1959 Cessna 172 from Sellingrove Pa. to Morgantown WV. Dan
Yeah, but I always soar 172's in the leeward winds... winds on the leeward side of the propeller count, don't they? :ban:
 

Norman

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Quite a while ago Philip Barnes wrote a simulator called "Algebratross" that shows the techniques that albatrosses use in more detail than these videos. It's clear over on the right so if you have a square monitor you may have to scroll sideways to see it.

[video=youtube_share;xlPI0AOj5MI]http://youtu.be/xlPI0AOj5MI[/video]
 

Jay Kempf

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On time after a strong frontal passage in the first week of April, with reported winds on the ground running 30-35 knots from the NW, I ridge soared a 1959 Cessna 172 from Sellingrove Pa. to Morgantown WV. Dan
I thought I was the only one who did dumb stuff like that. When I was building solo time in Cessnas I used to power back a 152 in calm conditions to say 300FPM descent rate and then go thermal it. The things are pigs so that is no simple task plus the visibility is terrible when circling. Have ridge soared them idling too. Dumb fun but fun none the less.
 

Pops

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I thought I was the only one who did dumb stuff like that. When I was building solo time in Cessnas I used to power back a 152 in calm conditions to say 300FPM descent rate and then go thermal it. The things are pigs so that is no simple task plus the visibility is terrible when circling. Have ridge soared them idling too. Dumb fun but fun none the less.
Working lift is never dumb. :) Dan
 
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