Post pictures of your cockpit with instruments here...

Discussion in 'Instruments / Avionics / Electrical System' started by CALL911, Nov 26, 2009.

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  1. Mar 31, 2015 #41

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    U.S. ultralight or Canadian?

    U.S. ultralights (Part 103) require no instrumentation. I have no idea about Canada.
     
  2. Mar 31, 2015 #42

    Dana

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    I know the Canadian ultralight definition is different, but in the US, there are no required instruments for ultralights. For other aircraft, I suspect Canada has the same requirements as the US:

    I don't know when a full glass panel is cheaper, but in many cases an electronic version is already cheaper than the cheapest steam gauge (the digital Tiny Tach is a good example).

    Dana
     
  3. Mar 31, 2015 #43

    Jay Kempf

    Jay Kempf

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    Beautiful.
     
  4. Apr 1, 2015 #44

    TJay

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    here is How I did my Quad City challenger, It works for me.
     

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  5. Apr 1, 2015 #45

    kent Ashton

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    Round-dial. Cheap, effective. Set-up for right-seat pilot. Yes, dumb, but I'm used to it now.
    DSCF3810.jpg
     
  6. Apr 1, 2015 #46

    gtae07

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    What are all those hook things coming out of the panel?

    Disclaimer: This applies to experimentals only, unless noted.

    It depends on how you define "cost effective". If the glass setup gets no credit for its additional capabilities over an all-steam panel, then you don't really hit that point until you talk IFR. But if you are willing to trade a bit more cost for more capability in a VFR panel, a modern glass setup gets you things like a full engine monitor with data logging and monitoring/warning of critical values. That's a good thing for a lot of people; it allows you to manage the engine better and keep tabs on it, possibly giving you better/earlier warning of an impending failure (see Mike Busch's writings). If you do a lot of long cross-country flights, it gives you an autopilot (nice to have if you're following the same course for an hour or two; really nice to have if you have to reroute around weather or do other heads-down stuff).

    Of course, once you go IFR, glass pretty much wins hands-down. For roughly equivalent cost (or less cost), a properly-integrated glass panel is lighter, more reliable, and provides far better situational awareness than a steam setup.

    Now, if all you're doing is local day VFR with the occasional cross-country in a simple airplane (e.g. Pops's mini Cub, the aerobatic biplanes some other members have, an Aircam or Breezy, etc), you're probably better off just with steam and a tablet or smartphone running a navigation app (which maybe isn't really needed, but provides a lot of benefit at minimal cost). Or, if you have a certified airplane without glass/GPS, this is the way to go.

    I'm also a really big fan of ADSB-In; traffic advisories are great (but keep up your visual scan) and the weather datalink simply beats the pants off calling FSS or ATC. If you're on a VFR cross-country and the weather looks to be deteriorating, you can get a radar picture for the next 300 miles and see the weather conditions at possible diversion airports in any direction you choose, and then lay in your course and be heading there, in less time than it would take to look up the proper frequency to call someone. And you see it right there in front of you, instead of trying to build the picture in your head off of someone's verbal description. If you get a glass setup, go ahead and get ADSB built in; if you have an existing steam panel or don't need/want a full glass setup, get the above-mentioned tablet and some kind of ADSB receiver.
     
  7. Apr 1, 2015 #47

    kent Ashton

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    Homemade post lights. :)
     
  8. Apr 1, 2015 #48

    don january

    don january

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    Re: Post pictures of your cockpit.

    dash kr2.jpg kr2 : Trying to up grade, need more glass
     
  9. Apr 1, 2015 #49

    Pops

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    Something to think about. Look at the instrument panel of a NASCAR auto. Round gauges turned so the needles are pointing up (12:00 ) when everything is in the green. The human brain takes longer to look and process a number than to see that all of the needles are at 12:00 in your peripheral vision. A lot of pilots are spending a lot of time looking at the digital numbers instead of looking out the windshield.

    Dan
     
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  10. Apr 2, 2015 #50

    Riggerrob

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    Valid point about needle angles.
    When skydiving, I don't have a lot of time to read my altimeter, so I just glance at it ocassionally. Old-school, analog skydiving altimeters only have one needle and are numbered the same as analog watches, with 12,000 feet at the top of the dial and 6,000 Feet at the bottom.
    Since I normally exit the airplane between 10,000 and 12,000 feet the needle is near vertical. As the needle unwinds past 9,000 (straight left) I still have plenty of time for free fall. As the number approval re straight down) I focus more intently on my student as I taught them to open their parachutes at 5,000 feet, just past bottom dead centre. By the time the needle reaches horizontal again (3,000 feet or straight right) I should be hanging under an open parachute. So I really only glance at the angle of the needle on my skydiving altimeter.
    Mind you, learned to read analog clocks before digital watches were invented.
     
  11. Apr 2, 2015 #51

    BJC

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    Same thing when flying aerobatics; the entry speed I need is not a number, but a needle position.


    BJC
     
  12. Apr 2, 2015 #52

    BJC

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    Same thing when flying aerobatics; the entry speed I need is not a number, but a needle position.

    But I really like a glass panel /EFIS for cross country flying.


    BJC
     
  13. Apr 4, 2015 #53

    Dana

    Dana

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    Finally took a picture of the cockpit in my new plane... just installed the new altimeter this afternoon, but it's too windy to fly today.

    Panel_773_reduced.jpg

    Dana
     
  14. May 6, 2015 #54

    Thalass

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    That's how airliner instruments are laid out - if they're steam driven. Everything lines up when everything is normal.
     
  15. Dec 31, 2015 #55

    WK95

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    The whole setup is reminiscent of a circuit board especially with the green painted panel. Looks cool especially and I'm sure that's something the techies on here can appreciate.
     
  16. Dec 31, 2015 #56

    Mark Z

    Mark Z

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  17. Jan 1, 2016 #57

    Daleandee

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    Here's my simple panel. MGL gauges that give it a "steam gauge panel" look but are lightweight and give a tremendous amount of flight and engine information. I have an LRI (Lift Reserve Indicator) on the top left:

    Panel.png

    Dale Williams
    N319WF @ 6J2
    Myunn - "daughter of Cleanex"
    120 HP - 3.0 Corvair
    Tail Wheel - Center Stick
    Signature Finish 2200 Paint Job
    114.1 hours / Status - Flying
     
  18. Jan 7, 2016 #58

    tab380

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