Naming Parts

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Atomic_Sheep

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Hi,

I've run into a problem that I'm sure has been faced before, but a search of this site and google, I've come up with practically no results that have been useful in helping me figure out how to best go about naming parts of my assemblies. The problem is as some have already guessed is related to loading multiple assemblies into a single file with sub parts of those assemblies being called the same thing. I'm sure I've seen this information somewhere before as it relates to aircraft design, but I can't find it any longer, but basically, what is a good way of naming parts so there is no naming conflicts?
 

BoKu

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I'm in the middle of this right now, updating the parts lists for the HP-24. These days I'm moving towards a definitive part number ("24-08-023") and a generic name ("bushing" or "spring"). I used to try to make every part name unique ("spring, return, jettison crank"), but they got long and unwieldy, and anyhow the part number does that.
 

Victor Bravo

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There's a tremendous opportunity for you to be like IKEA and come up with the most ridiculous and nonsensical yet unique names for these parts, which occasionally create some ethereal connection with the part's usage !

For example, the main spar would be "bendfrolic"

I now humbly bow my head and turn it over to Matther, who will create the "21st Century IKEA-esque aircraft part naming convention" thread :)
 

Mad MAC

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If you are using Drawing numbers, keeping a register will allowing you to tie drawing numbers to descriptions.

The best drawing numbering systems I have seen are below (probably overkill but always worth a look to cherry pick the helpful bits).

Location unique assembles / parts tend to location specific numbers looking like this: Manufactures Initials, model number - ATA chapter- sub chapter - 3 digits (4 if you don't use the ATA sub chapter), would look something like this AS01-5711-001. Which assuming you use the practice of saving the first 10 or 100 as numbers for assembly drawings & odd drawing numbers to left hand & even are right hand, then the example drawing number would mean Atomic Sheep, model 1, LH wing spar, top assembly.

For components used in numerous locations (clips brackets & the like) Manufactures Initials, First letter of the descriptor, 2 digit number, 2 letters. Looks like this BACR15CE which is Boeing, Rivet (there are numerous components starting with R so R15 becomes short hand for rivet, reduced shear head (the last to letters are unique identifies). These are often done as table drawings so the part number could have another 4 digits/ letters after the drawing number. This does mean all the similar components end up being grouped be it in stores or as file names.

At an OEMs that had relatively meaningless numbering system we use to end up walking around the factory looking for specific parts because that was the faster than find them through the drawing system (they also had a crap drawing naming system).
 

autoreply

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The ATEX (sic?) naming system is pretty common.

Every unique part has a unique number. General parts (fasteners) are numbered by the lowest assembly they're in, so 1320-AN6-8 for example.

Parts have 4 non-zero numbers, assemblies, dependent on hierarchy can have 1, 2 or 3 zeroes.

So 1000 is the fuselage assembly, 1300 is the cockpit assembly, 1320 is the seatback assembly, while 1321 is one of the parts of the seat-back assembly.

For symmetric parts (say the wing tips), only the positive one (right hand) is drawn/a part. The other is a mirror.

This way, it's immediately obvious what belongs where.
 

TFF

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I always like when part numberes use the ATA codes as part of it. If you see 5730 in the string you know it's wing leading edge.
 

Aesquire

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All the above advice is good.
I had to create a part number list for a car restoration parts company. Seat upholstery alone needed to identify unique auto model, trim level, color, and materials. Logical order was model, trim, materials, color. Alpha- numeric codes grouped all the Barracuda parts together etc.

The trick was cheat sheets with an easy to understand chart put up all over the place from first operation to the warehouse. I just asked for feedback from the crew and ignored the silly stuff.

Otherwise you get part numbers named Fred. Fred.967.307c.blk would be the 1967 Fred high line houndstooth cloth insert front & read seat cover set in black.

Needless to say it took a while. ;)

Cheat sheets and logic. Wing parts grouped together under one prefix code, etc.

Or use Elvish.
 

Turd Ferguson

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I think it would be unusual to have a part that doesn't fit standard nomenclature. Two bushings in the same assembly would have the same name "bushing" but have a different part number. If they were identical they would have the same part number with quantity as (2). If they were handed, one would have a part number, the other would have the same part number with a -1 on the end. If I did have a part that didn't fit standard nomenclature, I'd just invent a name - don't forget to use vowels.

ATA spec 100 is useful for showing the whole aircraft by section or function but I don't know of many light plane companies that use that.
 

Hot Wings

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I've always liked the VW part numbering system and have adapted a modified form for my projects. Each group of numbers relates relates to a more specific section of the assembly with the last suffixes indicating revisions of that particular part.

Examples:

LGL-12RB = Landing gear, link, #12, right side, version B
WRG-16auC = Wing rib, gusset, Rib #16, a position/upper, version C.

Numbers can be short, unique, and easily remembered/figured out.
 

Hot Wings

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gtae07

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Searching for ATEX and ATA in google yielded no results for me ��, ate there any links?
http://www.s-techent.com/ATA100.htm

My employer uses ATA chapter/subchapter, followed by a user-assigned number (to distinguish, say, left hand vs right hand), a letter identifying the type of part (sheetmetal, machined, plastic, casting, composite, assembly, etc.) and finally a sequential number. It took a bit to get used to but I really like it now.

There's also a prefix for model and for part class (production, repair, flight test, etc.).

For a kit aircraft you might see something like

1P576001S02

1 is aircraft model
P is production, or prototype, or primary (whatever you wnat it to be)
5760 is ATA chapter/subchapter (in this case, wing and aileron respectively)
01 is user assigned (e.g. 01 for LH, 02 for RH)
S means sheetmetal
02 is second sheetmetal part within that tree to get numbered



Van's numbers by location, model, and sequence. E.g. the F-704 bulkhead assembly is the main carrythrough section on an RV-7. Parts within it are F-704A-L, F-704A-R, etc. where 7 is the model it was first used on (you see common parts sometimes), the A is sub-parts and the L and R are obvious. Sometimes you'll see something like A-801-1PP where PP is "prepunched", denoting parts that weren't prepunched on earlier kits but now are.
 

wktaylor

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Not an easy topic... even the pros struggle to KISS naming and numbering conventions

ASME Y14.** Engineering drawing practices series of documents.

ASME Y14.100 Engineering Drawing Practices - Engineering Drawing and Related Documentation Practices

NONMANDATORY APPENDIX C DRAWING TITLES

C-1 GENERAL
This Nonmandatory Appendix establishes procedures for creating titles for engineering drawings and names for items detailed thereon as required by other than basic commercial applications.
C-1.1 Application
In the event of a conflict between the contents of this Nonmandatory Appendix and the practices detailed in
sections 1 through 7 of this Standard, this Nonmandatory Appendix shall take precedence when invoked.
... ...


NONMANDATORY APPENDIX D - NUMBERING, CODING, AND IDENTIFICATION

D-1 GENERAL
This Nonmandatory Appendix details numbering, coding, and identification procedures for engineering drawings,
associated lists, and documents referenced thereon as required by other than strictly commercial applications. It
also provides identification direction for parts, materials, processes, and treatments specified on these engineering
drawings and associated lists.
D-1.1 Application
In the event of a conflict between the contents of this Nonmandatory Appendix and the practices detailed in
sections 1 through 7 of this Standard, this Nonmandatory Appendix shall take precedence when invoked.

NOTE for individual Part Numbers and assembly numbers....

I prefer the convention -odd # = LH side as shown.... next higher -even# = would be the RH side [not shown, mirror image, opposite]

IF a corresponding LH or RH opp was NOT required then the -odd or -even number PN is NOT BE USED.

But then John Thorp used the sequential numbering system for LH & RH [mirror image parts/assys], thus...

-1L Rib [shown], -1R Rib [opp]
-2L Stiffener [shown], -2R Stiffener [opp]
-3L Fitting [shown], -2R Fitting [opp]
10L Assy [shown], -10R Assy [opp]
etc...
 

Tiger Tim

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I just remembered that the old Taylor J-2 parts catalogue I have somewhere had a novel way of naming parts. Each major assembly was given a letter, then each component within that assembly was given a man's name that started with that letter. For example, if you needed to order a couple ribs and a wing tip bow you would be requesting something along the lines of two Franks and a Fred which I believe helped avoid screw ups when telegraphing in your order that would be inherent with an alphanumeric system.

Maybe less than ideal today, but I always like interesting solutions of the past.
 

Hot Wings

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I just remembered that the old Taylor J-2 parts catalogue I have somewhere had a novel way of naming parts. << >> which I believe helped avoid screw ups when telegraphing in your order that would be inherent with an alphanumeric system.

Maybe less than ideal today, but I always like interesting solutions of the past.
I find that an interesting solution. Back when I was ordering parts a lot I would ALWAYS fax the order (pre internet). Voice communication made as many mistakes as any Morse code could. With a hard copy when I got 800 of the wrong spark plug I could tell if it was my screw up or the warehouse.

Thanks for the bit of history!
 

wktaylor

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...but today, today we have Naming of parts... Henry Reed (Couldn't resist it...) ...Hmmm... Aussie humor???

First aircraft I worked on was the Aerostar [Santa Maria CA, 1979--1980]. Naming and drawing number conventions were a combination of Douglas LB and Aerocommander. One thing that I really liked was when a simple modification was made to any part [LH or RH], that ONLY required cutting/drilling, and had limited effect, a letter code [one or more] could be tagged to the PN... without changing the base PN.

Loved working F-16s... GD used a smart variation of the ATA system. Based on the drawing number and simple prefix codes, it was easy to determine what and where simply by looking at the number.

I NOW work on a very old jet... Naming and drawing number conventions drove me to drink... then it all became clear... they were learning 'how to do it' in the late 1940s/1950s... just needed decades more to find a simplified/straight path... current production acft drawings are far simpler/smarter/organized.
 

rtfm

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Hi,
Sorry - I'm an ex-English Teacher, and one of my favorite war poems was Henry Reed's "Naming of Parts" The first stanza goes like this:

To-day we have naming of parts. Yesterday,
We had daily cleaning. And to-morrow morning,
We shall have what to do after firing. But to-day,
To-day we have naming of parts. Japonica
Glistens like coral in all of the neighboring gardens,
And to-day we have naming of parts.

Reed contrasts preparation for war to the coming of spring. The poem is a satire to strict military order, and war. The desired precision and efficiency in war appears insignificant and meaningless when compared the the common movements of nature as spring arrives.

Regards,
Duncan
 
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