6-seat canard homebuilt?

Discussion in 'General Experimental Aviation Questions' started by HBDan, Mar 10, 2010.

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  1. Mar 10, 2010 #1

    HBDan

    HBDan

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    I've been an aircraft nut for as long as I can remember and am looking at my options for building my own.

    Looking for a larger plane; a 6-seat would be nice. Would also need to accommodate skis and snowboards. Range at gross doesn't have to be exceptional -- I'm willing to sacrifice this aspect a bit. I also intend to go the diesel route.

    A while back the wingco got me excited. I like the idea of a lifting body to increase gross and the body-wing-body is a neat way to reduce drag and increase storage options, but wingco seems to be stagnant at best (iirc they never quite got any momentum and then a hurricane slamed them).

    The velocity is the closest to what I've seen so far, but I'd like something a bit bigger, i.e. longer, for an extra seat and it doesn't seem the velocity would hold skis/snowboards.

    Any thoughts? I'm leaning towards canards as that seems to be the most efficient way to haul both people and cargo at a decent speed and matched by only a more expensive conventional design.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2010
  2. Mar 10, 2010 #2

    mcjon77

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    There is currently no canard aircraft that meets your needs. At one point, velocity was considering developing a twin (think mini beech starship). IIRC, this twin had 6 seats, but it never went beyond a scale model stage.

    The only 6 seat homebuilts I can think of are the murphy moose, some of the compair line, and some of the epic aircraft. Epic went out of business, Murphy is almost out of business. My bet is that a Compair of that size is a $300K+ aircraft, at the minimum.

    This is one of those cases where the certified aircraft market has VASTLY better options than the homebuilt market. Bonanzas, Cessna 206s and 210s, Cherokee 6s, etc. A good example of any of these will probably cost less than half of what a Compair will cost.
     
  3. Mar 10, 2010 #3

    HBDan

    HBDan

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    I'd like to capitalize on modern technology rather than going with a WW2-era technology option. Want to go diesel too.

    I came across the Stallion which may do the trick. Not sure if there's a good diesel option for it. Maybe the DeltaHawk would work. I sent them an email.

    I wonder if Velocity's turboprop frame with a diesel could be an option. We'll see what they do with it.

    Bummer Epic is out of business. I only just came across their site and was impressed. Outside my budget anyway though.
     
  4. Mar 10, 2010 #4

    mcjon77

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    There is a Stallion owner who frequents this site. Hopefully he will see this thread.
     
  5. Mar 10, 2010 #5

    Waiter

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    They make Baggage pods that hold Skis, golf clubs, etc.

    They look like bombs mounted under the wings.

    Waiter
     
  6. Mar 10, 2010 #6

    billyvray

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  7. Mar 10, 2010 #7

    autoreply

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    You might be interested in the 5-seat Atlantica a BWB, though I'm completely unaware of their current status:

    Atlantica Blended Wing Body
     
  8. Mar 10, 2010 #8

    Tom Nalevanko

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    As far as I know, there is no diesel option for the Stallion. I flew mine with the recommended Continental IO-550. Others are flying with a Walter turboprop engine. A few builders decided on Lycomings and are "still working on them". One builder was close with an auto-conversion but gave up and donated his whole project to a charity. There is a builder in Florida working on an auto-conversion. But no diesels... There is a lot of work to build a Stallion and a lot more if you change out the engine from its original design. But it is a great plane...
     
  9. Mar 10, 2010 #9

    bmcj

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    For passenger count and cargo space, I think Compair is probably the first choice that comes to mind for most people.
     
  10. Mar 10, 2010 #10

    Tom Nalevanko

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  11. Mar 10, 2010 #11

    bmcj

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    I don't remember the name of it, but there was once a homebuilt (conventionally configured high wing) that had 4 landing gear (2 front and 2 rear, like a car). From what I remember of the appearance, I would guess that it had a sizeable seating capacity. Anyone remember the name or have any pictures?

    Of course, you might be able to build something like this and put diesels on it :gig: :

    https://www.homebuiltairplanes.com/...-incorperated-into-homebuilt-2.html#post64517

    Bruce :)
     
  12. Mar 10, 2010 #12

    Richard Schubert

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  13. Mar 10, 2010 #13

    autoreply

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    ... if you find them :)

    The only diesels around are the Thielerts (and Austros). Ofcourse there are also the WWII diesels, but apart from those it's very hard to think of a diesel that wouldn't be impossible to get airborne..
     
  14. Mar 10, 2010 #14

    bmcj

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    Yep, that's it. Thanks Autoreply. I find it interesting that he started the design it in 1981, but flew it to Oshkosh in 1944. :gig:
     
  15. Mar 10, 2010 #15

    AnxiousInfusion

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    Have you considered designing your own?
     
  16. Mar 11, 2010 #16

    HBDan

    HBDan

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    Now that would be neat. Not exactly what I'm looking for and rather slow, but neat just the same.

    I can't help but think of a Widgeon wreak I saw on thetube -- the biggest example of pilot error I can think of (probably drunk), but it's not labeled as a Widgeon, and I can't find it to link it.

    That "Wickham B" twin otter would be neat too, but with the same drawbacks and not what I'm looking for. I think I would go the Murphy Moose if I wanted to go the cargo and/or amphibious route. Their RebelSport is tempting as a fun day-trip plane.

    Hum, sounds like it could really cut down on performance. But at least it's an option. I wonder if I could get a few volunteers to ride in them. ;)

    You get rid of yours? Is the Stallion any more work than, say, a Velocity? I'm really liking the Stallion right now, despite the lack of a good disel route, as it can haul both people and cargo. Would be pushing my budget at best though, and it's noticably more expensive than a velocity, ceteris paribus. Maybe by the time I have enough clams saved up to start on a project the price of carbon fiber will have come down somemore and a diesel option will be available for the IO-550 designs.

    The DeltaHawk, which I mentioned above, is apparently a known option for the Velocity.


    No. That would be a serious endeavor in an of itself. A lot of things need to be just right and that's hard to do. I wouldn't even go that route for an RC project, though admittedly I would have less of a reason to.
     
  17. Mar 11, 2010 #17

    Dana

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    Long skinny things that don't weigh too much are no problem. The later Taylorcrafts had what was essentially a stovepipe running from the normal baggage compartment behind the seats back to the tail. I don't know the weight limit, but it was intended for things like skis, fishing poles, etc.

    -Dana

    To Be Old And Wise You Must First Be Young And Stupid
     
  18. Mar 11, 2010 #18

    HBDan

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    ^yeah, I saw that once in a traildragger. I'm not sure how that idea could be applied to the velocity though. Only thing I can think of is going external like one poster mentioned.
     
  19. Mar 11, 2010 #19

    Mac790

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    Baggage pods are removable, if you don't need them just remove them. If I remember correctly you lose about 8kts, if you fit them.

    Seb
     

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  20. Mar 11, 2010 #20

    kent Ashton

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    Well, people have stretched the Cozy IV; I suppose you could stretch a Defiant to six places. What a Spruce Goose that'd be!

    You'd probably come out ahead though, to get a job and earn the money to buy a real six-place airplane. However, if you do get your six-place homebuilt flying, you'll be a shoo-in for the cover of Sport Aviation (and Kitplanes!). :) Go for it.
     

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