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Little Scrapper

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When my daughter was just out of college I overhauled her Slant 6 and the little 914 auto trans. A very overbuilt engine and a simple good transmission. I don't know how much the slant 6 weighs but they are heavy. Didn't know there was a aluminum block version. One of the most reliable 6's made.
The leaning tower of power. Had one in a Duster.
 

rbrochey

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Best car I ever owned was a 1960 Valiant 2 door with red bucket seats and a slant six... I was 16 when my dad bought it for me in the mid 60's for $350.00. (He bought it so I could go to work part time at a gas station pumping gas, I had to pay him back) That little bugger was quick and safe... I put a Barracuda rear end in it. The only problem was it constantly burned out alternators. I tried everything, then finally switched it to an old Chevy generator and never had another problem. Mechanics scratched their heads when the opened the hood.

:)

valiant.jpeg

valiant2.jpeg
 
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Kevin N

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I drive a slant six almost every day, '84 Dodge P.U. 179,000 miles and no major mechanical work. Backed up by a 5 speed manual. It's not a pretty truck but it's rust free and solid. I get people offering to buy it often. Rock Auto is great for parts.
 

Daleandee

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The only problem was it constantly burned out alternators. I tried everything, then finally switched it to an old Chevy generator and never had another problem. Mechanics scratched their heads when the opened the hood.
I've owned a few MOPAR (My Old Plymouth Ain't Running) products over the years. Seems that their electircal systems were the shortfall, at least in my experience. And to think, some Pipers had Chrysler alternators on them. Scary!

Hard to beat an old Chevy SI series alternator system. Fit one on a Toyota and my brother put one on a VW bug. Long story ...

Dale Williams
N319WF @ 6J2
Myunn - "daughter of Cleanex"
120 HP - 3.0 Corvair
Tail Wheel - Center Stick
Signature Finish 2200 Paint Job
142.2 hours / Status - Flying
Latest video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qd-QAxccgas
 

lr27

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When my daughter was just out of college I overhauled her Slant 6 and the little 914 auto trans. A very overbuilt engine and a simple good transmission. I don't know how much the slant 6 weighs but they are heavy. Didn't know there was a aluminum block version. One of the most reliable 6's made.
It's my understanding that the block was originally intended to be die cast aluminum. They had the cast iron one for a backup, with basically the same design but with more conventional casting methods. So that's part of why it's so beefy.
Model A is 200 cid or 3.3 L and weights about 300 lbs FWF with radiator and prop. Almost light weight. 40 HP. My guess, for "modern" as they are now old direct drive auto, would be Ford 3.8, Buick 3.8, or Buick 215 family, Buick 3.8 is really part of that family. I would pick the Buick 3.8 as the best of that bunch. Lots of performance parts to strengthen it up. The straight 6s are pretty heavy. The only straight 6 that would be close would be the early 170-200 Ford.
I have seen 475 lbs quoted for the weight of either engine, unmodified, as they come from the car. As with the Model A, you can get aftermarket parts for these. As I remember, the exhaust and intake manifolds looked awfully heavy. If you're really lucky, you might find one of the aluminum ones, as a number of them were manufactured. Apparently they required special maintenance, which second and third owners would neglect, resulting in corrosion problems. I think the maintenance was just flushing or replacing the coolant or something.

Someone mentioned the length. The overall length is 32 inches according to the figure I found. It seems really difficult to find good figures for length and weight of these two engines.

If, after converting to aircraft use, one of these is still heavy, it might be nice on a heavier aircraft. There was one STOCK version good for 196 hp. Not sure about the low end torque on that one, but there were also versions for trucks. I don't know why I'm going on about this, except maybe for the low end torque.
 

lr27

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BTW, my old Saturn was over 200,000 miles before it was opened up, and then only because of a busted timing chain guide. At the end, somewhere over 260,000 miles, the odometer was broken. People I've spoken with said these cars kept going for a very long time; mine certainly did.

My car had the SOHC engine. Wikipedia says it weighed 197 lbs or something like that. I think it was supposed to have 85hp. A later SOHC engine made 100, and the The DOHC makes 125 horsepower, but is slightly heavier. However, I don't know if those had the same reputation for reliability. I think that figure was with all the junk on it! Swag Automotive sold an aero conversion with a PSRU, but, given how the owner died, it might not be a good idea. He was flying a Varieze with a converted and apparently hopped up Metro engine in it. Never got enough power to climb over trees at the end of the runway. Verdict was severe preignition. Or at least that's the rumor.

From looking at a torque curve, it appears my engine (or possibly the 100 hp version??) would get 50 hp at 2500 rpm. The DOHC would get a bit more. So maybe on a Piet you could get away without the PSRU?? What happens to engines like this if you run them at high throttle settings and 2500 rpm?

A further consideration for this and other more recent auto engines is that, from what I've read, lead kills oxygen sensors.
 

Kevin N

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Perky has been making those like that for about 30 years. Strangely enough he doesn't run them on his ship. I heard Perky is not well. He has been a pillar in the Piet community forever. I will investigate on my trip to Kansas City.
 

Kevin N

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Ken Perkins. His model A powered piet is all over youtube. red with 850x6 tires with no brakes. Very meticulous machinist from the Kansas City area. He makes ford conversion parts too. His airplane is in a lot of the Broadhead videos.

Edit: I don't know how to embed the youtube here but his airplane is in the opening of youtube title "broadhead 2009 part 2" Shows his airplane taking off.
 

Little Scrapper

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I know the man, I just never heard him called Perky or at least didn't put two and two together. Broadhead is local to me. He has a nice Piet.
 

Kevin N

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It says Perky right on the side of his Piet. One of these days I will learn how to spell Brodhead. I keep putting a "A" in there.
 

Little Scrapper

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Actually, it says "PERKS" on the side.

I always spell it like a broadhead on a arrow, lol, you'd think I'd learn by now.
 

blane.c

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The advantage of making your own hubs is they can be designed to fit a standard aircraft axle.

A milling machine with a DRO will drill the flange holes with no dividing head
A dividing head or Rotary Table can be had for $169.00 for six inch or $245.00 for eight inch either would suffice for drilling a hub but it may be easier and less expensive to fixture to the eight inch. http://www.cdcotools.com/ under the milling tools section, Rotary Tables (Horizontal & Vertical).
And he also sells DRO's for those that prefer.
 

AlistairL

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Jan 31, 2016
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Ohio
Wonder if it is still easily possible to make a Pietenpol into a biplane conversion?I know there is the St. Croix but it seems it is not available as easily.I would love to try out a biplane version as I think it will have the same style as a Jenny.
 

lr27

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That looks a bit like a parasol Fly Baby, but wouldn't it be more honest to call it "Miss Denial" rather than "Miss Forever Young"? OTOH, people seen to have real trouble spelling the word:
denali-travel-trailer.jpg

It made me think of the Pober and Corben parasol designs also, but perhaps that's just because they also have parasol wings.
 
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