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lr27

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I wonder if a Model A powered Air Camper has ever taken off from water. Ice doesn't count.
 

AlistairL

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What gauge sheet steel for the metal parts and how easy is it to make them?
 

Vision_2012

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Shady Cove, OR
What gauge sheet steel for the metal parts and how easy is it to make them?
0.090" 4130 for fittings. Very little welding, some bending. You did hear that B. Pietenpol designed it to be easy for the non-professional to build?
In this modern era, someone could be offering plasma cut parts, but one could also cut them out using a hack saw and dressing them with a file.
 

BJC

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0.090" 4130 for fittings. Very little welding, some bending. You did hear that B. Pietenpol designed it to be easy for the non-professional to build?
In this modern era, someone could be offering plasma cut parts, but one could also cut them out using a hack saw and dressing them with a file.
Did the original use 4130, or something like cold rolled 1020?

0.090 4130 is really stout.


BJC
 

Vision_2012

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Original 1020, IIRC. But it's probably the same density. I am reading the GN-1 plans. If you want original, get a set of plans for yourself. I reserve the right to modify and improve.
 

BJC

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Original 1020, IIRC. But it's probably the same density. I am reading the GN-1 plans. If you want original, get a set of plans for yourself. I reserve the right to modify and improve.
Thanks, but no, I do not want a set of plans, was just curious about the use of such thick 4130.


BJC
 

Tiger Tim

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I still love that plane, but my bodysizes prohibit the owning of such a bird. 6'6" and 254lbs.
I'm 6'5" and 230lbs and can jam into a short fuselage Piet. With a long fuselage (common), taller cabane struts (common), and 65hp (very common) you could have a nice little airplane.
 

Tiger Tim

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And where to get the hands on the long fuselage plans?
Right here: http://www.pietenpolaircraftcompany.com/purchase-pietenpol-air-camper-plans-and-aircraft-kits

If you're really serious about a Piet; join the Pietenpol mailing list, the Facebook group, read every page of the West Coast Piet site and ask lots of questions. The Air Camper really is the plane for the masses and so many have been built that just about everything has been tried. Don't like wood? There's a steel fuselage option. Don't like steel either? A couple guys have made them from aluminum. Don't trust the Ford Model A on an airplane? Take a look at the fifty or so other engines that have worked, and the list is growing! This airplane is about as open source and it gets and any change you can think of has probably been tried so there's nothing you can go into totally blind. Heck, even the Grega GN-1 exists for those who want something that looks like a Piet but want to use as many Cub parts as possible.

About the only reasons not to build a Pietenpol are because you don't want one, or you already have one.
 
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Tiger Tim

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Of course, if you absolutely must have a bigger Piet, wouldn't something like this be cool with a direct drive V-8?
 

Tiger Tim

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Sikorsky-Jenny. That would be a monster for a homebuilt.
Could you imagine cruising the countryside in something so dated yet substantial though? The thing about the Piet is that for a big guy like me it feels like a 7/8 scale model. A Jenny would be a whole other level, regardless of what wing it had. Too bad they're sized right out of cheap hangarage.
 

lr27

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Could you imagine cruising the countryside in something so dated yet substantial though? The thing about the Piet is that for a big guy like me it feels like a 7/8 scale model. A Jenny would be a whole other level, regardless of what wing it had. Too bad they're sized right out of cheap hangarage.
I could imagine it. At Provincetown on Cape Cod, they used to have a big old airplane, I think a Stinson, that you could take rides in. It was slow and had a rumbling old radial that wasn't all that noisy and spit oil on the windshield. Everything was quite steady and the view was excellent. I think it could carry something like 4 or 5 passengers. Sedate, slow and dignified, but also fun. Not a good airplane if you were in a hurry, though.
 

AlistairL

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My local Lowes sells MDF boards that are 49 in. x 8ft.Probably be best to buy two for a fuselage jig.
 

Pops

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I could imagine it. At Provincetown on Cape Cod, they used to have a big old airplane, I think a Stinson, that you could take rides in. It was slow and had a rumbling old radial that wasn't all that noisy and spit oil on the windshield. Everything was quite steady and the view was excellent. I think it could carry something like 4 or 5 passengers. Sedate, slow and dignified, but also fun. Not a good airplane if you were in a hurry, though.

Was it one like this. Me flying a 1943 GullWing Stinson. Taken from the front cockpit of a 1943 Stearman. Both airplanes belong to my neighbor and he was flying the Stearman.
Both were sweet old birds.
 

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lr27

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That's a nice airplane, but I'd have remembered if it was that model. I think it had a constant chord wing and was very conventional looking. No cowling either, as I recall, or at least I could see the cylinders clearly.
 
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