Novel Flaperon

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GESchwarz

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I have just dreamt up a novel idea for a flaperon. It may solve the problem of it stalling in flap mode due to the increased coef of lift. Instead of the aileron deflecting down, as does the flap, it only moves aft. This increases wing area, and opens a slot to blow high energy air over the aileron. It could even drop it down and aft so that it becomes like a Junkers aileron, which has no bad habits.

The actuation would be driven by a link from the flap which supports the hinge of the aileron. The outboard aileron hinge would be conventionally mounted, therefore the effect of this flaperon feature would be 100 percent at the in board edge of the aileron and 0 percent at the tip. This is for simplicity and weight consideration.

Well, what do you aerodynamisist think?
 

GESchwarz

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I just thought of a simple way to hinge both ends of the aileron. The aileron itself would be part of a 4-bar linkage, as viewed from above. It would be actuated by a link from the flap mechanism. Aileron actuation would be effected through a typical mixer linkage.

The ailerons would be absolutely stall proof and therefore the plane may be spin proof!
 
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Tiger Tim

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Why not go the other way? Normal ailerons but have them increase wing area for low speed flight.
 

GESchwarz

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Why not go the other way? Normal ailerons but have them increase wing area for low speed flight.
That's basically it Tim. In fact, the four-bar can work in any axis, so long as the angle of incidence of the aileron does not change significantly...want to maintain a low CL.

Already I am giving serious consideration toward pursuing patent protection for this idea. I have long wondered how to solve this problem, and I think I have found it.
 

RPM314

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If you're gonna do that, do it quick! You just blabbed it all to the Internet.
 

Tiger Tim

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That's basically it Tim. In fact, the four-bar can work in any axis, so long as the angle of incidence of the aileron does not change significantly...want to maintain a low CL.
Ah, I had first read it as the flaps stay as flaps but the ailerons would extend the chord. Understandably it left me wondering why.

Speaking of why, if big flaps are important to you why not just go with full span flaps and roll spoilers?

The MU-2 is capable of going very dangerously slow on final (no longer allowed) and the roll spoilers have the added benefit of removing all aileron-induced weirdness near the stall. In the flight regimes the Rice Rocket operates in there seems to be no ill effect brought on by this configuration. Your plane may not be suited, however.
 

SVSUSteve

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I seem to recall that someone actually suggested something similar a few years back? Do a Google search for "PAV.STOL.Libby.flaperon.pdf" as that's the file I have describing it. The designer's name is John Libby out of Tucson.
 

GESchwarz

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Ah, I had first read it as the flaps stay as flaps but the ailerons would extend the chord. Understandably it left me wondering why.

Speaking of why, if big flaps are important to you why not just go with full span flaps and roll spoilers?

The MU-2 is capable of going very dangerously slow on final (no longer allowed) and the roll spoilers have the added benefit of removing all aileron-induced weirdness near the stall. In the flight regimes the Rice Rocket operates in there seems to be no ill effect brought on by this configuration. Your plane may not be suited, however.
Why has this configuration not been applied to other aircraft, if it is so good? One reason might be that spoilers for roll control are outside the experience and comfort zone for a lot of people.

On thing I have to keep reminding myself about is that on my design, I am restricted on how much I can move my center of lift, as I have a tandem seat, pilot in back, therefore I must keep my CL and CG as stable as possible. Split flaps are known for having a minimum amount of pitching moment, so that may be the way I will be going.
 

gtae07

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I think the E-2 uses a system like this, but it moves both ends of the aileron. I don't know what advantage moving only one end would gain you.

Edit: It's visible here:
2622393.jpg
 

Hot Wings

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Are you suggesting that it is not patentable because I published it here?
If you described the feature, or claim, you would make in the patent, then yes. By publishing the idea, even if it is your idea, it becomes prior art. The US patent process is a whole new wonderful government agency just waiting to be explored :dis: :para: :eek: :wail:.

The US patent office does have one redeeming feature. They get no tax money. It is supported by the patent and maintenance fees. You have to pay maintenance fees at 3.5, 7.5 and 11.5 years to keep the patent valid - so don't file for the patent until you are ready to go to market, or it's likely to get "discovered" by another.

I made the same mistake about the FTI on a patent I'm sitting on and had my notebook notarized etc. Fortunately I'm kind of paranoid and hadn't explained it to anyone.
 

GESchwarz

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Mi
I think the E-2 uses a system like this, but it moves both ends of the aileron. I don't know what advantage moving only one end would gain you.

Edit: It's visible here:
View attachment 41382
That is very interesting about the E-2. It does look like we have seen two examples of what I am talking about in peoples responses. I am just now thinking that I could use this to compensate for when I am carrying a passenger in the back of my tandem seat design.

Thank you all for your responses.
 

autoreply

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Why has this configuration not been applied to other aircraft, if it is so good? One reason might be that spoilers for roll control are outside the experience and comfort zone for a lot of people.
Non-linear responses and essentially no control feel.

Have a good look at the Schleicher system. Flaps droop twice as fast as the ailerons. This is reversed once you go over 35 degrees flaps, flaps go further down, ailerons go up again. Nice thing is that beyond 35 degrees, stall remains the same, yet drag goes up as does aileron authority.

Extremely efficient flaps are nice, but have their limits. Massive extra drag for example, which with fowler flaps you can't retract. Also don't forget the tail that is very quickly becoming rather large (and a longer wing span and small tail would have benefitted you more)

In the end, what matters more, assuming decent but not excellent pilot skills is wing loading and the ability to adjust drag.
 

cheapracer

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Are you suggesting that it is not patentable because I published it here?
Exactly so, the idea is now public property other than any "non-obvious" detail that you haven't disclosed, you can still Patent those parts of the idea.

The only people you can discuss the matters with are possible investors, manufacturers, employees and relevant people with interest under an agreed NDA (non disclosure agreement). Employees come under an automatic secrecy act simply by being employed and are obliged to protect the company.
 
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