N numbered Ultralight??

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USMC227

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Hey all,
I’m not sure this is a legitimate question but what if someone built a compliant ultralight: weight, speed, seats, fuel, etc., but had it N Numbered. Could they still fly it under ultralight rules?

Along the same lines, what if you built a compliant ultralight but followed all the rules for getting it N Numbered but didn’t do it, can they do it later?

And lastly, what if someone built a compliant ultralight but then decided to add fuel capacity or a larger engine that took it over weight. Could they get it N Numbered?
 

pwood66889

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Guess it is my turn as the first one to log on today -- Eastern Time Zone, and all that.
Q1: You can "N" number anything. It is called "Experimental - Amateur Built." So long as you jump through the propper hoops. See the FAA regs if in USA.
Q2: Would you be flying it between now and "later?" Why you would take the risk of following "all the rules," which involves telling the FAA what you are doing?
Q3: Again, it is called "EAB." You just have to make like you bought the "compliant ultralight" as a partially completed kit, or unfinished project.
YMMV (by FSDO involved), of course.
And, when the rest (read: more experienced) members of this forum chime in, they can provide both of us an example of what an illegitimate question" might be... :) Yours seems like scenario exploration to me. Where you flying it out of?
Percy in NW FL, USA
 

don january

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So you got you a ultralight and want to slap on a N number no problem The system would be glad to get your jingle ling and cut you the papers. If you modify the craft beyond PAR 103 well then I guess you'll need your PPL and a N-number.🛩
 

Aerowerx

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So you got you a ultralight and want to slap on a N number no problem The system would be glad to get your jingle ling and cut you the papers. If you modify the craft beyond PAR 103 well then I guess you'll need your PPL and a N-number.🛩
If you put an N number on it you will need a PPL with or without any mods beyond part 103.

There are several companies that offer part 103 ultralights that are also offered as LSA. The only significant difference is the gas tank (and maybe a bigger engine), and the N number on the tail.
 

USMC227

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Thanks for the replies guys. So here is the “what for”.

Build the ultralight and fly is under part 103. Then sometime later, get my Sport Pilot or Private. If I understand correctly, I won’t be able to build time with a license unless the craft is N numbered. So I then N number my little friend and I build time in it. That’s what I’m thinking.
 

jedi

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Hey all,
I’m not sure this is a legitimate question but what if someone built a compliant ultralight: weight, speed, seats, fuel, etc., but had it N Numbered. Could they still fly it under ultralight rules?

Along the same lines, what if you built a compliant ultralight but followed all the rules for getting it N Numbered but didn’t do it, can they do it later?

And lastly, what if someone built a compliant ultralight but then decided to add fuel capacity or a larger engine that took it over weight. Could they get it N Numbered?
Just in case the prior answers were confusing: No, yes, yes.

In addition, once you N number it you can not go back to ultralight nor fly under FAR 103 rules.
 

TFF

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Adding an N number without building documentation will be hard to get. Cant buy a flying 103 airplane and then turn it into N. You will have to build it and hopefully it looks un used to the inspector when they come to check it out when you want to change.
 

BJC

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I’m not aware of a time limit between completion of construction and applying for an E-AB CoA. But if that were my plan, I would first talk to the local FSDO, and thoroughly document the build.


BJC
 

USMC227

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Ok gents, thanks for the input.

Yes, I left out the documentation portion but yes, I would build it like an E-AB, pictures, log, etc.

I’m thinking a Legal Eagle XL and go from there.
 

crusty old aviator

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You're going to need some flight instruction in the beginning, why not go Sport Pilot from the get go? UL flying is pretty limited, especially if you're planning on advancing to SP or maybe PP.
 
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jedi

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You're going to need some flight instruction in the beginning, why not go Sport Pilot from the get go? UL flying is pretty limited, especially if you're planning on advancing to SP or maybe PP.
I strongly disagree! UL flying has far fewer limits than Part 91 flying. If you can't see that from reading the regs then you should take a flight with an UL qualified pilot/instructor. Just as in PPL instruction the real fun starts when the instructor disappears only more so!

If you think flying a Pitts would be more fun than flying a B-737 then what do you think the fun meter would be when flying a 35# or 75# airplane? Which would you prefer to drive, a bus or a sports car. But then I would take even a VW Bug over the bus. Maybe it's just me.
 

Dana

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103 and 91 both have limits, but in different areas. Neither is "better", I enjoy both, for different reasons.

But to the original question, yes, you can N-number an ultralight, even if it's already been flown, if you can prove that it was amateur built. Then you're bound by the 91 rules. Alternatively, if you have an N-numbered aircraft that meets the ultralight limits, you can turn in the N-number and fly it as an ultralight. But it's not something you're going to switch back and forth regularly.
 

jedi

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Just in case the prior answers were confusing: No, yes, yes.

In addition, once you N number it you can not go back to ultralight nor fly under FAR 103 rules.
From post #7:

Srtike thru statement was wrong. Sorry.

Thanks Dana for pointing this out. Edit time limit has expired. You can return to 103 rules but not on a routine basis. The Airworthiness Certificate must be surrendered. See AC 103-7 section 15 for additional details.
 

crusty old aviator

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If you think flying a Pitts would be more fun than flying a B-737 then what do you think the fun meter would be when flying a 35# or 75# airplane?
Which Pitts vs. which B-737?
What “airplane” weighs 35 or 75 pounds?
Are you referring to a hang glider?
Oh hell, I’ve been sucked OT again...never mind!
 
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