How to transfer 1: 1 drawings from paper to wood?

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Orsovolante

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Hello to all.
A seemingly trivial problem but ...
Today many drawings are released in 1: 1 scale.
Very useful to check the correctness of your construction but I still haven't found a good way to transport these designs on wood.
In particular, the shapes to be obtained directly from the plywood.
How do you do it?
 

BJC

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For form blocks, I mark a straight line on the wood, apply a light coat of varnish, immediately lay the printed paper on the wood, and apply a coat of varnish over the paper. After the varnish is dry, I use a straight edge, scale and square on the straight lines and dimension marks (printed on the paper) to verify that everything is straight and square.

For applications where I want no varnish on the wood, I have use carpet tape, rather than varnish, to fix the centerline and the edges to be cut.


BJC
Edited to clarify that the lines and marks are printed on the paper.
 
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cvairwerks

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Depends on the complexity of the drawing.... Simple part, just redraw directly on the material. Complex part, then using carbon paper and tracing, or a pounce wheel. Super fancy, convert the drawing to dxf and use an x-y machine to directly draw with a sharpie..

Be aware that depending on the accuracy specified, that there can be some significant growth or shrinkage of printed lines, as well as due to line widths. When I was a board drafter, I always included an accurately drawn X-Y scale on every drawing that had dimensions. Converting to bluelines, there was always some size variations. With the scales on the master, it copied to the print. Any print could be checked by the machinist and verified. Most of the drawings I did were 20x scale, due to the finished part size. Back then CATIA was just out and Autocad was coming, but we couldn't afford either at the University.
 

Orsovolante

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Depends on the complexity of the drawing.... Simple part, just redraw directly on the material. Complex part, then using carbon paper and tracing, or a pounce wheel. Super fancy, convert the drawing to dxf and use an x-y machine to directly draw with a sharpie..

Be aware that depending on the accuracy specified, that there can be some significant growth or shrinkage of printed lines, as well as due to line widths. When I was a board drafter, I always included an accurately drawn X-Y scale on every drawing that had dimensions. Converting to bluelines, there was always some size variations. With the scales on the master, it copied to the print. Any print could be checked by the machinist and verified. Most of the drawings I did were 20x scale, due to the finished part size. Back then CATIA was just out and Autocad was coming, but we couldn't afford either at the University.
Even if I was referring to drawings only on paper, your idea is interesting.
Somewhere here on the forum, I saw the posts of a person who directly obtained the parts drawn on the CAD, with a fairly simple 2-axis CNC machine.
Here in Italy, there are cnc wood cutting services on files formed by the customer also online, or laser tracing. (surely elsewhere I am also ahead).
The problem is that the materials on which the service is carried out are those of common use.
I found similar services for model aircraft, while on a large scale nearby there is a company that makes boat kits, with entirely laser-cut plywood.
I don't know if anyone has already designed a wooden plane, designed for a simplified assembly with such parts.
 

don january

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This is what I've done. Root ribs: use masking tape and lay out print on ply as tight as possible. If doing a curvature shape such as airfoil a French Curve. (Pic) This tool aids but all can be done by hand. Take a good size Tee pin and follow the line slowly hole by hole I try for a 1/8" spacing. If a straight line a ruler and a RC covering tool for removing air bubbles from Monokote looks much like a pizza cutter works well. This method will mare your plans but you have a pattern for the other amount of root ribs needed. I think its a good thing to see plans getting Worked. Don 20191225_073125.jpg
 

Hot Wings

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or a pounce wheel. Super fancy, convert the drawing to dxf and use an x-y machine to directly draw with a sharpie..
Another vote for the pounce wheel. Standard issue tooling in the sewing world.

Side note about paper accuracy:
Don't worry about it, especially on wood. Both paper and wood change size/shape. There is nothing practical we can do about it. If you need accuracy better than you get with paper and wood then you are using the wrong material or expecting unreasonable results.

There is reason wood workers are called "craftsmen". Each piece is hand made - and individually fitted.
 

stanislavz

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In pre china cheap pcb making - i had used an hot-iron laser toner transfer.

Print it on any glossy paper using laser printer in mirror, lay it on the pcb, image down of course and "iron it", Youtube is great. Even one with wood :

 

Hephaestus

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In this age... A good 90° picture of the drawing and a micro projector - also make sure you're at 90° then adjust distance to a known measurement...

Personally, I scan and print a second set of drawings to cut up...
 

Geraldc

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I just print out part full size on paper and then glue to wood or metal with 3m 77 spray adhesive and cut around.My cnc router lies idle except for many identical parts.For parts larger than your printer can take I use a program called postrazor
that prints on multiple sheets with join lines.
https://sourceforge.net/projects/posterazor/
 
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MadProfessor8138

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The method I use to transfer parts to wood is pretty basic and crude but it works.
There is a shipping store locally that does a lot of printing and is set up to print some very large sheets if needed.
The plans for my Ragwing Stork are printed on 11x17 sheets and I had 3 sets of the plans printed with extra copies of all pieces that are 1:1 scale.
The sheets that are 1:1 scale are laid directly on the template material wood,metal,etc. to form a pattern/template for router work to produce usable parts.
The sheets are attached with either 3M spray adhesive or a very thin coat of Elmer's white glue that has sat long enough to get tacky.
Simply lay the sheet on the material keeping it smooth as you apply...a credit card works very well to keep the sheet smooth as you apply,dont get in a hurry.
Yes,this sheet has been sacrificed but that is why you had the extras printed for those particular sheets.
Total printing bill for a couple hundred sheets was around $35-$40....

Kevin
 

Dana

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As stanislavz said, print a mirror image with a laser printer and iron it on. Or use an inkjet printer, print it on the used backing paper that you peeled stickers off, and immediately (don't allow time for the ink to dry) press it on with a stiff plastic card.
 

Pops

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The method I use to transfer parts to wood is pretty basic and crude but it works.
There is a shipping store locally that does a lot of printing and is set up to print some very large sheets if needed.
The plans for my Ragwing Stork are printed on 11x17 sheets and I had 3 sets of the plans printed with extra copies of all pieces that are 1:1 scale.
The sheets that are 1:1 scale are laid directly on the template material wood,metal,etc. to form a pattern/template for router work to produce usable parts.
The sheets are attached with either 3M spray adhesive or a very thin coat of Elmer's white glue that has sat long enough to get tacky.
Simply lay the sheet on the material keeping it smooth as you apply...a credit card works very well to keep the sheet smooth as you apply,dont get in a hurry.
Yes,this sheet has been sacrificed but that is why you had the extras printed for those particular sheets.
Total printing bill for a couple hundred sheets was around $35-$40....

Kevin
Do I have to open a credit card account ? :)
 

MadProfessor8138

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Pops.......nope,your drivers license should work just fine or worse case scenario crack out your Kroger card....lol
Actually,I save all the junk mail credit cards for just such occassions,I have a box of them in the shop...they're free,disposable and get put to good use instead of throwing them away.

You should see what I do with the "win a car" free keys that the dealerships send in the mail....lol

Kevin
 

stanislavz

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press it on with a stiff plastic card.
Or use some roller. Its give better pressure, and dont move paper. I was doing pcb with 0.3mm tracks with 0.2mm gap. So it have to be nice and steady. Now i would try trick with acetone too.

Or - just build/buy a router on table top.

Using this kind of el cheapo rails.
 

Attachments

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Aug 11, 2008
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If a paper copy of a drawing, place the copy with the ink side against the surface you want to transfer to. Take a cotton ball and apply rubbing alcohol to the back side of the paper copy. You don't need much. An old model airplane trick. Some inks are resistant so experiment.
 
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