Crashes in the News - Thread

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Tom DM

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Isn't every ejection seat/egress system a single parachute system?😉
Of course, if we count the drogue chute they aren't. And maybe if a rocket is doing the work, it ain't even a "jump."

It seems inconsistent to allow legal BASE jumping with one parachute (and from an altitude where a reserve chute isn't practical) but then not allow a solo jump from an airplane without a reserve chute.

These day nothing is allowed anymore.

Yesterday I was told that (in Belgium) you need a licence to fly an RC -plane. And I laughed at the guy...
And now it turns out to be true: there are even 3 certifications.

There is a urgent need for a certificate to get out of bed... it has been proven beyond reasonable doubt that bad things can and do happen otherwise.

As to BASE-jumpers and other Red Bull-lunatics: go on! Jump! Miss me!
 

Riggerrob

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Canada
Isn't every ejection seat/egress system a single parachute system?😉
Of course, if we count the drogue chute they aren't. And maybe if a rocket is doing the work, it ain't even a "jump."

It seems inconsistent to allow legal BASE jumping with one parachute (and from an altitude where a reserve chute isn't practical) but then not allow a solo jump from an airplane without a reserve chute. Assuming the participant is an adult, isn't puting others at risk, etc. I wouldn't choose to make a voluntary jump from a plane in peacetime without a reserve, but that's just me.
Rules are radically different for emergency versus intentional parachute jumps.
Back when the rules were written (1920s) round parachutes were brand new and not terribly reliable. FARS were initially written around pilot emergency parachutes which only contain a single parachute canopy. Modern PEPs are still single canopy. Pilots in distress sort of count the airframe as their first "main parachute" considering that they planned to land inside the airframe.

OTOH during the 1920s, barnstormers began doing exhibition jumps from airplanes. A few died when their single parachute failed to open, so FARS were modified to insist upon dual-parachute systems.
After a few exhibition jumpers died while wearing dual-harness, dual-parachute systems, FARS were amended to insist on single-harness, dual-parachute systems. A single harness with separate main and reserve parachute canopies remains the standard for intentional military and civilian jumps to this day.

The situation got more confused during the 1980s when BASE jumpers started developing single-harness, single-parachute systems specifically for BASE jumping. The majority of BASE jumps are done from such low altitudes that reserve parachutes are useless. Fortunately, modern square reserves and BASE canopies are far more reliable than their round predecessors. USPA statistics point to one malfunction per 700 jumps on skydiving main canopies which are all square these days (since 1990). Skydiving main parachutes are packed much quicker and sloppier than reserves or BASE canopies, so sloppy packing is the most common cause for skydiving malfunctions.

It got really confusing when some BASE jumpers wanted to do practice jumps from aircraft. They might have found a loop-hole for jumping from tethered balloons, but single-parachute jumps have never been legal from free-flying aircraft.
The majority of BASE jumpers who want to jump their BASE rigs from free-flying aircraft do not have the first clue as to the physics or deployment times or deployment distances. These BASE jumpers are on the Dunning-Krueger Scale of not knowing what they don't know.

Finally, there are few legal BASE jumping sites, with the majority of BASE jumping still being done on the sly, under-the-radar without permission of land-owners.

The FAA and USPA banned single parachute jumps a long time ago because of high fatality rates. Even though modern square parachutes are more reliable, they have not re-written laws. Given the sloppy packing skills of most skydivers, I consider it unwise to legalize intentional, single-parachute jumps.

You may call me a grumpy old gray-bearded master rigger who learned how to jump round parachutes during the 1970s, but habits acquired during the 1970s have kept me alive through more than 7,000 skydives making me too old and too grumpy to change my attitudes. The FAA, USPA, etc. are even slower to change their attitudes.
HUMPF!
 

WBNH

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Oct 5, 2006
Messages
364
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Portsmouth, NH
I’ve been trying to come up with an applicable definition for the acronym SNORT we could use maybe he’d would’ve appreciated that.
But that’s a tough one trying to tie those letters to a “slow down and pull out that checklist and use it every time you strap in“ kind of a theme.

This could sound unduly cruel, and I don't mean it that way...as I have the utmost respect for Capt Snodgrass...but for Humor (hoping he'd laugh at this himself), anytime you even think of taking off without all the appropriate preflight checks completed, think SNORT! (Some Numbskull Once Regretted This.)

Cringe. Hoping I don't regret thinking of that one.
 

D Hillberg

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Nov 23, 2010
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very low low low earth orbit
This could sound unduly cruel, and I don't mean it that way...as I have the utmost respect for Capt Snodgrass...but for Humor (hoping he'd laugh at this himself), anytime you even think of taking off without all the appropriate preflight checks completed, think SNORT! (Some Numbskull Once Regretted This.)

Cringe. Hoping I don't regret thinking of that one.
Some Numbskull Once Regretted This... A fitting tribute.

Just leave it up to a government hack to truly screw things up and take the fun out of life,
 

Pops

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USA.
Rules are radically different for emergency versus intentional parachute jumps.
Back when the rules were written (1920s) round parachutes were brand new and not terribly reliable. FARS were initially written around pilot emergency parachutes which only contain a single parachute canopy. Modern PEPs are still single canopy. Pilots in distress sort of count the airframe as their first "main parachute" considering that they planned to land inside the airframe.

OTOH during the 1920s, barnstormers began doing exhibition jumps from airplanes. A few died when their single parachute failed to open, so FARS were modified to insist upon dual-parachute systems.
After a few exhibition jumpers died while wearing dual-harness, dual-parachute systems, FARS were amended to insist on single-harness, dual-parachute systems. A single harness with separate main and reserve parachute canopies remains the standard for intentional military and civilian jumps to this day.

The situation got more confused during the 1980s when BASE jumpers started developing single-harness, single-parachute systems specifically for BASE jumping. The majority of BASE jumps are done from such low altitudes that reserve parachutes are useless. Fortunately, modern square reserves and BASE canopies are far more reliable than their round predecessors. USPA statistics point to one malfunction per 700 jumps on skydiving main canopies which are all square these days (since 1990). Skydiving main parachutes are packed much quicker and sloppier than reserves or BASE canopies, so sloppy packing is the most common cause for skydiving malfunctions.

It got really confusing when some BASE jumpers wanted to do practice jumps from aircraft. They might have found a loop-hole for jumping from tethered balloons, but single-parachute jumps have never been legal from free-flying aircraft.
The majority of BASE jumpers who want to jump their BASE rigs from free-flying aircraft do not have the first clue as to the physics or deployment times or deployment distances. These BASE jumpers are on the Dunning-Krueger Scale of not knowing what they don't know.

Finally, there are few legal BASE jumping sites, with the majority of BASE jumping still being done on the sly, under-the-radar without permission of land-owners.

The FAA and USPA banned single parachute jumps a long time ago because of high fatality rates. Even though modern square parachutes are more reliable, they have not re-written laws. Given the sloppy packing skills of most skydivers, I consider it unwise to legalize intentional, single-parachute jumps.

You may call me a grumpy old gray-bearded master rigger who learned how to jump round parachutes during the 1970s, but habits acquired during the 1970s have kept me alive through more than 7,000 skydives making me too old and too grumpy to change my attitudes. The FAA, USPA, etc. are even slower to change their attitudes.
HUMPF!
The heighthe of ignorance is when you don't know and don't know that you don't know. Example-- Politicians , Poly--- meaning "Many".
Ticks --- meaning blood sucking parasites.
 

BBerson

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Port Townsend WA
Single pilot should be memorized, not reading a checklist. Keep your eyes looking out of the cockpit for incoming traffic.
Same for landing checklist. I was taught GUMP 40 years ago. You can make any checklist you like for your particular pilot level. Should be simple to avoid being ignored. Most people do not use a checklist in personal ground transport.
 

jedi

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Sahuarita Arizona, Renton Washington, USA
Class D airspace and all ADSB equipped? What could go wrong here? Do we need to ground all single engine aircraft?

Perhaps allow high wing airplanes on odd days and low wing aircraft on even days is the only workable solution, like when you are allowed to water your lawn.

Oh no! How can I water and fly both on the same day? I will need an automatic watering system and a self piloting airplane.
 
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Tom DM

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Mar 31, 2022
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291
Location
EBGB Grimbergen airfield (N of Brussels, Belgium)
Class D airspace and all ADSB equipped? What could go wrong here? Do we need to ground all single engine aircraft?


Perhaps allow high wing airplanes on odd days and low wing aircraft on even days is the only workable solution, like when you are allowed to water your lawn.

Oh no! How can I water and fly both on the same day? I will need an automatic watering system and a self piloting airplane.


Always those problems for which solutions are already found and implemented....
 

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