Wanna build a 110 year old airplane?

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Tiger Tim

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How about a book that walks you through building an early airplane? It’s pages 35 or 74 you’ll want to start with:
http://archive.org/stream/buildingandflyi00haywgoog#page/n162/mode/2up

I think either a Curtiss Pusher or Bleriot XI would be great to have around, though with no illusions of them being in any way practical I’m not sure I could justify the time and money in them. Not yet, anyways. I do know where to find most of an original engine for a Bleriot...
 

plncraze

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A Bleriot! Is that a 3 cylinder? I thought when Louis was on his way across the Channel his poor little engine was at the limits of its endurance. It would be cool on an Easy Riser LOL!
 

TFF

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There is a guy at Oshkosh that has a “new” Bleriot with a Rotec radial. I have seen it a couple of times. There is probably some concessions but it looks like a stable hand full. About ten years ago there was a full correct one with Anzani.

I would have to restore the engine, even if it was just running on a stand. Probably easy considering each one was hand made. No fancy castings.
 

Tiger Tim

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I would have to restore the engine, even if it was just running on a stand. Probably easy considering each one was hand made. No fancy castings.
You might be surprised by how some of those early engines were made. I think Louis Bleriot became famous for making the airplane into something more than a curiosity and as a result his airplane became mass produced, sold as kits, licensed to other manufacturers, and just copied probably hundreds of times over all around the world. The popular Anzani engine in them was made by a company who made motorcycle engines so I would imagine that’s the origin of most of the parts.

My friend’s Bleriot engine is from Humber, a company that actually license built the whole airplane. The engine itself look so to be a bit bulkier than an Anzani, and this particular one is only about 3/4 complete. I suspect it threw a rod so some scrounging would be needed for various bits before it ever runs again.
 

TFF

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Mass production was a lot cruder then. By that I mean an average machinest could pull off with chunks of metal instead of something complicated like a Chevy v8 head. Like I said, I would try to make it run. It would be fun.
 

pictsidhe

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Anzani also made radial. Some were fitted to Bleriots... They are a pretty crude design, something that many home machinists could make. Though a Verner would be much more powerfull and reliable.
 
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cheapracer

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I still think a modern 4 cylinder diesel would make a great vintage plane engine, to give some sounds and smoke while being reliable and practical.

Here's an old favorite of mine ...



aircraft design chart.jpg
 

blane.c

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Maybe a little newer, you know after they figured out that since engines were going to quit it would be better to put plenty of them on the plane as spares.
 

lr27

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How about an Antoinette Monobloc? Obviously you'd want to go a lot lighter, and maybe smaller too. If you made it the original size, but light enough to use the original 50 hp, it would probably be a fair motorglider.
 

lr27

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P.S. If you want to build a 110 year old airplane, you will need a time machine or patience and an extended life span. ;-p
 

Dana

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Problem with a modern aircraft engine like an O-200 turning 2700 rpm on an old design like a Bleriot is that it even with 100HP won't give anywhere near the low speed thrust that the original did with 37HP turning a giant prop at maybe 1200 rpm. So you need a reduction drive... waitaminute, what thread is this?

Frank Tallman wrote in Flying the Old Planes about the appalling performance of his Bleriot with a modern engine. He speculated that the lower HP original would have been even worse, but it was probably a lot better. Old Rhinebeck has an original Bleriot with the original Anzani engine, which they fly regularly (though not more than hops down the runway). It's the second oldest flying airplane in the world (the Shuttleworth Trust has a slightly older one).
 

lr27

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The Monobloc was very clean for its era, so perhaps it could make better use of a modern engine. Particularly if you cheated the least little bit on the airfoil, which appears to be completely flat on the bottom.
 

blane.c

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Problem with a modern aircraft engine like an O-200 turning 2700 rpm on an old design like a Bleriot is that it even with 100HP won't give anywhere near the low speed thrust that the original did with 37HP turning a giant prop at maybe 1200 rpm. So you need a reduction drive... waitaminute, what thread is this?

Frank Tallman wrote in Flying the Old Planes about the appalling performance of his Bleriot with a modern engine. He speculated that the lower HP original would have been even worse, but it was probably a lot better. Old Rhinebeck has an original Bleriot with the original Anzani engine, which they fly regularly (though not more than hops down the runway). It's the second oldest flying airplane in the world (the Shuttleworth Trust has a slightly older one).
Like Pops has iterated on other posts (but more subtlety) "cubic inches"

Wikipedia and win!



Gnome Omega
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


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Omega

Gnome 7 Omega on display at the Royal Air Force Museum London
Type Rotary aero engine
Manufacturer Société des Moteurs Gnome
First run 1908
Major applications Blériot XI
Bristol Boxkite
Number built 4,000 until 1914[1]
Unit cost £520 in 1909[1]
The Gnome 7 Omega (commonly called the Gnome 50 hp) is a French seven-cylinder, air-cooled aero engine produced by Gnome et Rhône.[2] It was shown at the Paris Aero Salon held in December 1908 and was first flown in 1909. It was the world's first[1] aviation rotary engine produced in quantity. Its introduction revolutionized the aviation industry[3] and it was used by many early aircraft. It produced 50 hp (37 kW) from its capacity of 8 l (490 cu in).[4] A Gnome Omega engine powers the 1912 Blackburn Monoplane, owned and operated by the Shuttleworth Collection, the oldest known airworthy British-designed aeroplane worldwide.[5] A two-row version of the same engine was also produced, known as the Gnome 14 Omega-Omega or Gnome 100 hp. The prototype Omega engine still exists, and is on display at the United States' National Air and Space Museum.[2]
 

PMD

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110 year old airplanes are not exactly built to the standards of aerodynamic stability and structural integrity that came a bit later.

Oh: and modern diesels don't smoke.
 
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