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Vigilant1

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Oh thank you so much I have been looking for that list and the sunshine clipper on it since a week or two after I joined this forum it seems that I saw it in the first week and then couldn’t find the list again
The sunshine clipper appears to be a work of pure genius!!!
Here's a short piece from Kitplanes on the Sunshine Clipper. Complete with photos. "Unique"
Sunshine Clipper - KITPLANES
 

blane.c

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Oh thank you so much I have been looking for that list and the sunshine clipper on it since a week or two after I joined this forum it seems that I saw it in the first week and then couldn’t find the list again
The sunshine clipper appears to be a work of pure genius!!!
Ok you have to admit the genius was drinking a few beers.

The perfect van to compliment the Sunshine Clipper.wfdvyzgfys8gt2i7knpq.jpg

Just joking around a little, the Sunshine Clipper looks like a cool fishing machine (so does the van).
 
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Pilot-34

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Now that I know what the name of it is it’s amazing how many pictures and articles there are of it on the Internet
 

blane.c

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I am really liking the early (light) prototype of the Sia Marchetti FN-333 RIVIERA, the Nardi FN-333



image_2021-01-28_150853.png

FN-333-40-750.jpg


NARDI_FN-333_3_view_01_740.jpg

The lines of the 333 merged with the simplicity of the Avid Catalina could be promising.


AvidAmphibian_(4446497697).jpg
 

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Sockmonkey

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A couple old favorites.


And the last one compared to the FN-333 using a lifting tail and the engine moved back a bit for a simpler structure, more lift, and a shorter takeoff run.
 
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Riggerrob

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Dear sockmonkey,
You rsecond sketch reminds us of Payen and Sea Era.

During the 1930s and 1940s, a frenchman named Payen proposed a whole series of tandem-winged airplanes with conventional main wings, but delta rear wings. Only one or two of Payen's proposals flew.

Sea Era was a one-off experimental seaplane built by a guy in Washington State. He also proposed various combinations of conventional and delta wings. I saw the low-winged Sea Era prototype at the Arlington Fly-In one year (circa 2000). He also proposed a high winged version with a delta lower wing/sponson.

Now I understand you suggestion for a lifting rear wing to balance the weight of the pusher engine.
 

Sockmonkey

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Dear sockmonkey,
You rsecond sketch reminds us of Payen and Sea Era.

During the 1930s and 1940s, a frenchman named Payen proposed a whole series of tandem-winged airplanes with conventional main wings, but delta rear wings. Only one or two of Payen's proposals flew.

Sea Era was a one-off experimental seaplane built by a guy in Washington State. He also proposed various combinations of conventional and delta wings. I saw the low-winged Sea Era prototype at the Arlington Fly-In one year (circa 2000). He also proposed a high winged version with a delta lower wing/sponson.

Now I understand you suggestion for a lifting rear wing to balance the weight of the pusher engine.
Bingo.
The Sea Era just used the delta as a sort of biplane arrangement and still needed a conventional tail pushing down to rotate for takeoff. With a tandem it's all lift.
Having the engine farther back and putting the prop even further back than that with a short extension shaft means the thrust line isn't making the plane nose down which would cost further lift.
There's also the safety factor in that the straight fore wing will always stall before the aft wing, making the plane stall-proof. The delta also gives a certain amount of yaw stability, so you don't need as much rudder either.
I'm gonna be cocky and say this seaplane concept could possibly be better than just about anything else available.
 

Geraldc

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Not plans but could be done like this.
1612209988924.png
 

JohnB

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I like that. Put a reversing propeller on the back, and amaze bystanders when docking / departing.



I had Beta on my Seabee (IGO-480) and would back away from the gas pump, do a rolling 180 while moving to forward thrust and continue without stopping, ALWAYS got called a showoff at minimum. jb
 

blane.c

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I am getting that for a flying hull pontoons work best as far as keeping the wing out of the water but are more subject to being removed inadvertently and other problems that then ensue while sponsons are not as stabilizing but generally are more rugged and a good place to put the landing gear for amphibious and a place of purchase for egress.
 

Pilot-34

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Is there a reason you can’t just let the plane lean over on a wing tip after slowing ?
 

blane.c

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I've seen artist conceptions of wingtips bending downward and bulged out at the bottom to serve as pontoons and even as floats but never seen a picture of an actual airplane like that. It seems if you are at slow enough airspeed when a wingtip "hits" the water you may be fine but to fast and it'll be ugly. When it comes to accelerating, how you going to get enough speed dragging the wingtip to actually get it up and out of the water and not do silly circles around the pond? That is either going to take one serious water rudder or asymmetrical thrust from a twin. And then there are the questions of how far the wingtip is allowed to sink, I mean how much is to much? Egress? Could get ugly ... "don't worry dear, you just have to sit at this weird angle until I get 'er up to speed ... it'll be fine". And of course there will be people congregating, pointing at your airplane and making comments.
 
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