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Pilot-34

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Apr 7, 2020
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I've seen artist conceptions of wingtips bending downward and bulged out at the bottom to serve as pontoons and even as floats but never seen a picture of an actual airplane like that. It seems if you are at slow enough airspeed when a wingtip "hits" the water you may be fine but to fast and it'll be ugly. When it comes to accelerating, how you going to get enough speed dragging the wingtip to actually get it up and out of the water and not do silly circles around the pond? That is either going to take one serious water rudder or asymmetrical thrust from a twin. And then there are the questions of how far the wingtip is allowed to sink, I mean how much is to much? Egress? Could get ugly ... "don't worry dear, you just have to sit at this weird angle until I get 'er up to speed ... it'll be fine". And of course there will be people congregating, pointing at your airplane and making comments.
I dont think you will have any airspeed when the wing tip either hits or departs the water.
I suspect from amature stability tests of small aluminum fishing boats That the aircraft will be stable at less than 10 mph.
 

Pilot-34

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Apr 7, 2020
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759
View attachment 107145
all those great ideas from the 30s and 40s :)
I remember studying that particular part of a Catalina for quite some time.

That was when I developed the concept of having a both spring loaded and airfoil shaped so it would work automatically.

Remember you’re looking at a writing arm approximately 20 feet long that kind of leverage a whole lot of flotation is not required
 

henryk

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Mar 8, 2010
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=made in Russia !

="ПОИСК"=

 

Sockmonkey

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Apr 24, 2014
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Flint, Mi, USA
I've seen artist conceptions of wingtips bending downward and bulged out at the bottom to serve as pontoons and even as floats but never seen a picture of an actual airplane like that. It seems if you are at slow enough airspeed when a wingtip "hits" the water you may be fine but to fast and it'll be ugly. When it comes to accelerating, how you going to get enough speed dragging the wingtip to actually get it up and out of the water and not do silly circles around the pond? That is either going to take one serious water rudder or asymmetrical thrust from a twin. And then there are the questions of how far the wingtip is allowed to sink, I mean how much is to much? Egress? Could get ugly ... "don't worry dear, you just have to sit at this weird angle until I get 'er up to speed ... it'll be fine". And of course there will be people congregating, pointing at your airplane and making comments.
The planes stay upright on their own. The wingtip floats are mostly just a safety feature.
 

sming

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Apr 10, 2019
Messages
120
It's a dream of mine to build a replica (and partly why i'm here) but it feels like a tall order for this not-mechanical engineer.
From what i've gathered, the RC version are not really well flying as well, just in case structural design wasn't enough, you have to find a stable configuration...
 

blane.c

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Jun 27, 2015
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capital district NY
The "Cub" not being fast to begin with did not suffer unduly when fitted with floats and a 85hp engine. The Anderson Kingfisher used the "Cub" wings and is reasonable. So if you want to do something Porco Rosso it may be an idea to put make up on a Kingfisher to make it look more like a pig.
 

Sockmonkey

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Apr 24, 2014
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Location
Flint, Mi, USA
What exactly is he using? It seems like a couple of inflatable pontoons that somehow work like a hovercraft?
Looks like a hovercraft skirt on each pontoon so it's like he's riding on two little hovercraft.
That's actually not bad when you think about it. Less drag than one big hovercraft skirt would be, and it works on water, snow, and regular runways with fewer parts than standard gear would be.
 
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