Lost art of technical drawing / drafting

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by Little Scrapper, Jan 30, 2019.

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes Forum by donating:

  1. Jan 30, 2019 #1

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Messages:
    5,239
    Likes Received:
    3,145
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I'm in the middle of service calls and stopped home for lunch and decided to pull out a fun book to read. I bought this many years ago on eBay for like $5. This is a text book for the Carnegie Mellon school of technical trades in Pittsburgh PA. It's dated 1908.

    I bought a bunch of these books because I just felt they were worth owning and enjoyable to read and learn. This is book 1and it takes you through a series of lessons starting with sharpening a pencil, to drawing lines, to drawing a square, then a bolt, then letters, all the way to complex drawings like the tailstock on a lathe.

    It's a lost art these days. Anyone here old enough to remember drawing by hand like this prior to CAD? There's something really neat about hand drawings that really pull me in. I can't be the only one who likes this?

    Older scratch built airplane planes can be pretty fun to look at just for this very reason, the art, the uniqueness of it.

    Hopefully the few photos I took of the book show up for clarity.

    IMG_20190130_123424911.jpg

    IMG_20190130_123339146.jpg

    IMG_20190130_123404449.jpg

    IMG_20190130_123410458.jpg

    IMG_20190130_123256384.jpg

    IMG_20190130_123301518.jpg
     
    Joe Fisher, Mr.B., Sockmonkey and 2 others like this.
  2. Jan 30, 2019 #2

    TFF

    TFF

    TFF

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2010
    Messages:
    11,120
    Likes Received:
    3,012
    Location:
    Memphis, TN
    Nothing better to look at than a set of plans. My grandfather was an architect and I got his stuff when he retired. I had this huge drafting table and all the goodies as a kid. I wish I had them now. When I took drafting it was still pencil but computers were coming. I just did not like how clunky they were at the time. I will still draw over computer.
     
    mcrae0104 likes this.
  3. Jan 30, 2019 #3

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Messages:
    5,239
    Likes Received:
    3,145
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    When I went to plumbing school I had to learn drafting. Brunnig? (Spelling) mechanical drafting arms. They were being phased out I believe I was the last class to have them.
     
  4. Jan 30, 2019 #4

    don january

    don january

    don january

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    Messages:
    2,587
    Likes Received:
    998
    Location:
    Midwest
    Years ago in my outlaw days I got a hitch in Rawlins Wyo and I was lucky enough to get a drafting class of pencil and paper and I must confess I couldn't get enough of it. and I remember taking a copy of that very book to my guest room and reading. OH what good times.:gig:
     
  5. Jan 30, 2019 #5

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Messages:
    5,239
    Likes Received:
    3,145
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Last group of photos. Hopefully they are clear. I love how they go over letters and shading etc .

    Here's a Perdue textbook from 1904, again, eBay for like $3 I think?

    IMG_20190130_125204166.jpg

    IMG_20190130_125219050.jpg

    IMG_20190130_125314931.jpg

    IMG_20190130_125429217.jpg

    IMG_20190130_125448779.jpg

    IMG_20190130_125525940.jpg

    IMG_20190130_125624701.jpg
     
  6. Jan 30, 2019 #6

    BJC

    BJC

    BJC

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
    Messages:
    8,877
    Likes Received:
    5,729
    Location:
    97FL, Florida, USA
    Guilty as charged. I work a crossword puzzle and a Sudoku puzzle each day. I delight in printing the numbers and letters in the puzzles as I did on designs.

    BTW, between the era of doing my own design drafting and having CAD operators who produced the working drawings, was an era of designers. Extremely talented people who increased the productivity of engineered dramatically.


    BJC
     
    Pops and Topaz like this.
  7. Jan 30, 2019 #7

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Messages:
    5,239
    Likes Received:
    3,145
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    How do you suppose the Pietenpole drawings were drawn? It's been a while since I've seen my set but it looks like it was made from pen? I remember the lines being pretty thick?

    I'm curious about the history of a drawing like that, from the 20's. The lines are not razor sharp or straight, almost cartoonist in a sense. I'm thinking his neighbor who drew them probably used just a pencil/pen and a ruler?
     
  8. Jan 30, 2019 #8

    TerryM76

    TerryM76

    TerryM76

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2012
    Messages:
    437
    Likes Received:
    153
    Location:
    Tempe, AZ
    Unfortunately this subject and others are simply not being taught nowadays due to the advancements in technology. I loved my drafting classes in high-school as well as welding, auto repair, etc.

    From what I have seen with my students, they have the hardest time printing legibly, understanding what they are reading and most cannot read cursive. They certainly don't struggle when fiddling ostentatiously with their electronic devices which seems to consume their interests.
     
  9. Jan 30, 2019 #9

    cvairwerks

    cvairwerks

    cvairwerks

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2010
    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    North Texas
    Between the board and the tube, I've got at least 11,000 hours of drawing time over the years. Last full set of drawings I did on paper were for a transonic wind tunnel model, back in 1984. That model still gets pulled out and used every so often at the university. The last velum work I did was in 1997, doing ISO9000 updates to some CT/MRI/X-ray power tubes for a company based in the UK. All the wording and labels on the prints was in German, and all the prints were done in reverse, on the back side of the velum. Lay them face up on the table and they were correct. You had to flip them over and work everything on the back side of the sheet....kinda weird at first, but got to be fun as I went thru them.

    CAD wise, started with AutoCad 6, progressed all the way to 13, Mechanical Desktop2 and 3, and had some time with Catia 3 and 5. Been using Draftsight off and on now and will probably end up with a copy of SolidWorks since I'm an EAA member.
     
  10. Jan 30, 2019 #10

    Tiger Tim

    Tiger Tim

    Tiger Tim

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2013
    Messages:
    2,772
    Likes Received:
    1,534
    Location:
    Thunder Bay
    I was in high school when the switch happened and was lucky enough to do some basic drafting as well as learning Autocad, and later Mastercam. I was good at the computer-aided stuff but absolutely loved the pencil-and-paper work. Gotta get back to it sometime.

    For a time reference, I'm presently 34.
     
  11. Jan 30, 2019 #11

    mcrae0104

    mcrae0104

    mcrae0104

    Armchair Mafia Conspirator HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,859
    Likes Received:
    1,882
    Location:
    BDU, BJC
    Yes. I draw by hand most every day.
     
    Mr.B. and Chris In Marshfield like this.
  12. Jan 30, 2019 #12

    wsimpso1

    wsimpso1

    wsimpso1

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2003
    Messages:
    5,625
    Likes Received:
    2,866
    Location:
    Saline Michigan
    A year and half in high school as part of engineering prep. We did our own drawings at ACCO chain conveyor (1978) and at Remington Arms (1980 to 1984). Have not done a drawing since as an engineer. Always had draftsmen, which came to be called designers. Then the CAD geometry could be passed electronically to the plants/suppliers for fabrication/tooling/quality and to CAE for all manner of analysis.

    Go to the homebuilt airplane, and let me tell you, I have drawing board with a parallel rule, triangles, scales, you name it. Gotta draw out my templates, fixtures, etc. Even that does not get much work.

    Yeah, it is a lost art.

    Billski
     
  13. Jan 30, 2019 #13

    Dana

    Dana

    Dana

    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    8,457
    Likes Received:
    2,855
    Location:
    CT, USA
    I started out on the board, wasn't until my third job that I was 100% CAD. I still enjoy doing an occasional hand drawn layout, and frequent hand sketches, but I'd hate to go back to hand drafting full time.

    I still have Dad's drawing board and compass set.
     
  14. Jan 30, 2019 #14

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,200
    Likes Received:
    983
    Location:
    Germantown, WI USA
    The Bearhawk plans are all drawn by hand. So many questions asked in the forum about how something is supposed to look because many can't "think" in three dimensions without a 3D CAD drawing to look at. I personally appreciate it having learned to draw by hand myself. :)
     
    Pops and Topaz like this.
  15. Jan 30, 2019 #15

    BJC

    BJC

    BJC

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
    Messages:
    8,877
    Likes Received:
    5,729
    Location:
    97FL, Florida, USA
    When I was a co-op student working for an electric utility company, I had to use a Leroy lettering set (ink) to print powerplant protective relay ID tags. Yes, it would have been faster to type them or print them, but they had this thing called “tradition”.


    BJC
     
  16. Jan 30, 2019 #16

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,200
    Likes Received:
    983
    Location:
    Germantown, WI USA
    Found this one in a shop in Chetek, WI last summer.

    55C13D34-0026-44E2-96F4-D593C1223895.jpg 880CAF19-BF9F-446A-AAF2-909E34113E39.jpg 45E672BE-E1CC-49FC-A16C-1F98EF416C35.jpg
     
  17. Jan 30, 2019 #17

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    Messages:
    6,351
    Likes Received:
    2,208
    Location:
    World traveler
    I took a pencil and paper architectural drawing class almost 20 years ago, really enjoyed it, was thinking about becoming an architect but already had a wife and son and couldn’t afford to go back to school and then apprentice. So I took the foreign service exam instead....
     
  18. Jan 30, 2019 #18

    TerryM76

    TerryM76

    TerryM76

    Well-Known Member HBA Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2012
    Messages:
    437
    Likes Received:
    153
    Location:
    Tempe, AZ
    My copies of the Kelleher Lark blue prints are beautiful, hand-drawn pieces of art.
     
  19. Jan 30, 2019 #19

    Lucrum

    Lucrum

    Lucrum

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    Messages:
    955
    Likes Received:
    188
    Location:
    Canton, GA
    I took mechanical drawing in high school, would have been around 1977
    With the exception of an X-Plane model, all the drawings I have of my project I did myself on a board with pencil T-square etc.
     
  20. Jan 30, 2019 #20

    Sockmonkey

    Sockmonkey

    Sockmonkey

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2014
    Messages:
    1,565
    Likes Received:
    402
    Location:
    Flint, Mi, USA
    I learned basic drafting in high school too. Liked it so much I did my friend's homework for in that class for him. I was kind of sad we didn't get to the more interesting bits later in the book.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white