Hey - why is no one build Heath Parasols anymore???

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GeeZee

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Couldn’t agree more about the Stolp Starlet. Have been pondering a non aerobatic light sport version with alum tube and gusset construction. For the wing the 10deg “widgets“ (as used on the upper wing of the Lil’Bitts biplane) could be used. Essentially built like the upper wing of a Bitts but increased to about 120 sq ft. A real shame the lighter Verner 5 cyl is not available. The O-100 would be a good second choice.
 

Larry650

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Unless, like me, it's been many a moon since you fit the FAA definition of a standard human being in terms of height and/or weight. Then a marginal two-seater can become a comfortable single-seater!
That's funny and reminds me of the big guy who put a bench seat in his Cessna 150 so he could fly happily solo thereafter.
 

Little Scrapper

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Ed Heath was a very tiny dude if I recall from my reading. lot’s of people were small back then but he was kinda extra small I think.
 

cluttonfred

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Built light with a modest engine I think you could get away with a stock Starlet stripped down to increase the drag a bit (no wheel or leg fairings) and a climb prop and still meet sport pilot limits.

Couldn’t agree more about the Stolp Starlet. Have been pondering a non aerobatic light sport version with alum tube and gusset construction. For the wing the 10deg “widgets“ (as used on the upper wing of the Lil’Bitts biplane) could be used. Essentially built like the upper wing of a Bitts but increased to about 120 sq ft. A real shame the lighter Verner 5 cyl is not available. The O-100 would be a good second choice.
 

GeeZee

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Possibly, it’s pretty close on stall. Listed as 55mph and LSA is max 52mph. That things built like a tank, 500 lb empty weight. I saw one once in person and they are tiny! For my own skill level with a taildragger I’d be more comfortable with a stall around 35-40 mph and I don’t need aerobatic strength. They sure are a pretty airplane.....
 

cluttonfred

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I have seen empty weights listed for the Starlet as low as 500 lb and as high as 650 lb and power from a 50 hp 1500cc VW up to a 125 hp O-290, though all seem to agree on a gross weight of 1,000 lb. Running the numbers for the Clark YH airfoil, I get a max CL of about 1.4, so at the Starlet's span and area you should just meet sport pilot stall speed at 800 lb gross weight. Vortex generators on the outer panels might reduce stall slightly and would likely improve low-speed control and safety near the stall. With just a 50 hp I get a climb speed of over 1,100 fpm so it would be no slouch even with a modest, hand-start VW conversion for low weight.
 

BJC

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I have seen empty weights listed for the Starlet as low as 500 lb and as high as 650 lb and power from a 50 hp 1500cc VW up to a 125 hp O-290,
I think that the prototype used a VW.

Can one of you Flabob guys verify or correct that?


BJC
 

Sockmonkey

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A lot of us are secretly members of the turkey club. Pilots big and tall enough to want "two seater" versions of older designs that mysteriously will have only one seat.
 

Victor Bravo

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A "typical" single seat parasol airplane is just that. The proportions and shapes are all just about the same. The design and configuration issues are all about the same (how to get the pilot in under the trailing edge, bending the longeron to allow a door, etc.).

What is essentially a very very similar concept is scaled up or down a little bit to make it relevant to pilot size and available power, and different structural materials are used to address preferences. A very large number of these airplanes are just slight variations on the same theme.

Which means... scale the size for the engine and pilot, use the materials properly, give it the same shapes and proportions as all the others, and you almost can't go wrong. Of all the things in aviation that are rocket science, laying out a simple single seat parasol ain't one of them :)
 

TFF

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There is also the Glen Beet Special that looks just like a Starlet but VW. Beet worked for Starduster. I wonder what the design difference is.
 

Sockmonkey

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I've mentioned this before, but If you make an old-school looking parasol in only two-axis, it's not hard to make it so the struts can be unhooked and the wing rotated 90 degrees on a central pivot for easy trailering and storage.
 

TFF

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The Legal Eagle has an update for folding wings. I don’t know the rigging changes needed, but since the aileron cables were external anyway, it’s probably not too big a deal
 

Brünner

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The Bakeng Deuce is for sale - as in the whole company, for a very reasonable price. Somebody better snatch it up!


The Bakeng Deuce Airplane Factory is FOR SALE! $25,000.00. This includes the new Peregrine Deuce, all molds all tooling, patterns, fixtures, templates, .....
 
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