Flying wing as cheap and simple option for basic fun flying.

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erkki67

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I’d rather stay within the parameters of Sockmonkey’s layout, where a prop damage only will occur if the pilots inputs will do so.
On a tail prop you’ll always have damage from the wheel trough up.
 

Mike W

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Nov 3, 2012
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Doncaster Yorkshire UK
What i'm saying is, use Backstroms parameters to size the control surfaces and locate the thrust line location relative to the CG, whether pusher or tractor. It worked on my aircraft with no pitch change noticeable with power change.
 
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Sockmonkey

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Apr 24, 2014
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Flint, Mi, USA
Al Backstrom planned (but I don't think he ever flew) a plank flying wing with elevons that extended beyond the trailing edge of the wing to get more area and authority and therefore reduce the span of the wing washed out when you pull back on the stick. Might be a good idea here....
This is why a few of my designs have the junkers flaps.
 

Riggerrob

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Sep 9, 2014
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Canada
Yes dear Aesquire,
The current generation of inflatable stand-up paddle boards are through-stitched with fancy sewing/quilting machines. They are all currently constant thickness.
I predict that within another year or two, that computer driven quilting machines will be able to sew boards of varying thickness. Once those are available, they will start building parachutes with quilting machines. Instead of ribs cut out of sheet fabric (silicone coated nylon) ribs will look more like spider webs with hundreds of threads at different angles, fanning out from suspension line attachment points. That generation of inflatable toys will have smooth top and bottom skins.
The next generation will have airtight walls (spars and ribs). I can even for see the top skin and bottom skin sewn together to form aileron hinges.
Inflatable structures are only limited by our imaginations.
 

Aesquire

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Jul 28, 2014
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Rochester, NY, USA
Riggerrob, here's the first picture of the Goodyear Airmat system I found.


I'm impressed that this tech is from the days when computers mostly used cams. I'm really impressed with the current stuff. I'm not so good with the Fabric arts, more a "beat metal with a hammer" guy, so I wasn't really paying attention to the technology behind the technology.

Unfortunately, while inflatable wings are very exciting, they don't fall under the category of cheap and simple, at least building at home.

OTOH, I've been watching some of the Kite designers, places like Maui, who do the design work, but have the kite made elsewhere, so if you are willing to sit at the computer and do brain sweat, then wait for the box to be delivered ( in the case of Hawaii... everything is overseas ) instead of building it in your garage, there's a way to be simple, and cheaper than buying a Computer controlled Thing.

CNC, mill, waterjet, sewing machine, all great stuff, but for most people, just sending the file to a company ( possible the garage next door :) ) and getting the parts back is most economical. I'm a tool freak myself, and would love a shop with a lot of expensive machinery, but first I need to dig the foundation for the bigger....
 

EzyBuildWing

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Sep 23, 2009
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Location
Sydney NSW Australia
Prop damage concerns? Don't use a prop at all.....
Put twin jet-engines (configured "over-and-under" ) in the rear of the fuse in an Opel Facet Flying Wing..... equals problem-solved!
Air-inlets to be as per NACA inlets similar to BD-5J.
Awesome performance, style and elegance.
"Nest-of-Dragons" has lots of info on the Facet Wing.
Engines to be as you see in the vid below, burning Jet-A for max performance.
 

erkki67

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Feb 18, 2010
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Romont / Fribourg / Switzerland
Aviafiber_Canard-2FL.jpg
I know its not a flying wing, but what intrigues me is the V-Pylon and it's rear wing.

Would a plank with two wider V-struts like on this Canard for the mainwing support, be able to absorb the elevator, and rudder ctl and on the main wing only the ailerons, or on the V-struts only the rudder and on the wings the elevons!?
 

erkki67

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Romont / Fribourg / Switzerland
I’m still humming around the plank of Sockmonkey , but to have a lifting V wingsupport instead of a single directional pod , is interessting, no?

even upside down with a sit on the wing fuselage, and an inverted V gives interessting perspectives
 

Sockmonkey

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Apr 24, 2014
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I’m still humming around the plank of Sockmonkey , but to have a lifting V wingsupport instead of a single directional pod , is interessting, no?

even upside down with a sit on the wing fuselage, and an inverted V gives interessting perspectives
Hmm, if it has the lifting V supports, you could eliminate the fuselage completely and just have them attach to a seat with trike gear coming off it. This would mean using the endplate rudders and the junkers flap for control. Though at the size of this thing, you could get away with a hang-glider type setup.
 
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