CriCri MC-15 in NZ

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daveroux

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hi all cricri fan's

I am david living in tahiti french polynesia
I start built of my cricri from original plan nbr 90 from mister Colomban , i have some contacts of friends in france flying cricri's with JPX engine
the major issu is the engine actually, so alternate engine ZDZ 210 or 3W are very intresting options
do you have some contacts of ZK-CRI owner ? just need to have some informations regarding 3W engine reliabilty and installation configuration
david
 

MadRocketScientist

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From memory Wayne has had two failures with the 3W engines so far. Not the best for the low amount of hours flown. After browsing the large model aircraft forums, I decided on the ZDZ engines because they seemed to hold up better and were pretty rugged.

I have sent you a PM about contacting Wayne.

Shannon
 

daveroux

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ok , your job on ZDZ installation looks very well thought out and well done
thanks you , will send you some pictures of my cricri parts soon
david
 

daveroux

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with my cricri plan , i also have some vintage cricri pictures of 70's
see attached cricri N°4
 

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daveroux

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hi ,
engines are VALMET engines , no more produced , reliable but less power than JPX 210cc
with this engines aircraft cruise speed was limited to 160 mk/h
this airplane has been crash and pilot killed during airshow following very lo level rolls... and stall
cricri is not a toy and could be dangerous if you did not take care of basic aviation rules
see attached 2 more cricri built by my friend daniel with same colors
 

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MadRocketScientist

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There haven't been many updates to this thread for a while because I haven't really done any building for a long time. I did finally get my 36% scale CriCri flying and have flown that a few times.

Recently I have acquired 5 hours of flight training in a tail wheel microlight (Karatoo) and I intend to use it in the next few weeks. So I guess it is the official start of flight training. Not entirely CriCri related but it is an important piece of the puzzle. In the meantime, I have a friend with a Piper Cub and today he took me up flying again. After I told him about my upcoming flight training he offered to give me some proper instruction since he is an ATPL

I have flown in the cub a couple of times before but was training in earnest today. The weather was near perfect sunny with clear skies with only light northeast sea breeze that could have been slightly lighter. It wasn't too strong but did provide some turbulence from off the top of the hangers on final approach to runway 07.

After a reasonably thourough preflight briefing on all the controls and where in he circuit we expected to use them, I strapped into the front seat with the instructor in rear. The Cub started very easily and we taxied to the end of 07, did the pre-takoff checks and waited for a gap in the traffic. Having only 2 or 3 aircraft in the circuit we didn't have to wait long. After some careful instructions on what to expect and what to do I did the first takeoff of the day. My instructor doing all the radio calls for the duration of the flying. I think there is a radio course or similar that needs to be completed before learning to operate the radio, I need to remember to ask about what is needed for that to happen.

I advanced the throttle slowly and used the rudder pedals to attempt to stay lined up with the runway. It seemed as if I was swerving all over the place and it was obvious that I didn't have a complete grasp of rudder control just yet. I didn't run off the edge of the runway but lets say that there was plenty of room for improvment. What caught me by surprise is just how quickly the rudder becomes effective as the airspeed increases. The amount of rudder needed to turn at very low speeds quickly caused a big swerve with a modest increase in airspeed and I was over-correcting during the first couple of takeoffs. Once I learned to expect the increased rudder effeciveness things started to improve in the directional control department.

As we lifted off the crosswind component was more than I expected and the Cub drifted off the center line a fair bit with the instructor pointing out the drift. My speed control on climb out wasn't the best and failing to hold the nose up enough the speed rose to around 80kts indicated rather than the optimum 60kts. Keeping a good lookout for the sparse traffic and then turning crosswind we climbed towards 1000 feet AGL. On reaching 1000ft it was then time to level off, throttle back and turn downwind. Easily accomplished although the late afternoon sun in the eyes did make checking for traffic a bit more difficult.

The downwind is where things happened a bit faster with the landing checks and after putting the carb heat on, slowing down to turn base. My instructor made things easier by doing the radio calls and reminding me of what to do next. As we slowed down and into the white arc on the airspeed indicator, the flaps could be deployed. When adding the first two notches of flap in the Cub there isn't too much of a pitch change, but when adding the third notch of flap, the nose wants to pitch up quite aggressively. The first time I pulled full flap in this aircraft, I wasn't expecting anything other than the small pitch change from the first and second notch, so the nose pitched up and ruined the stabilized approach casing the aircraft slow down and then to drop too low. Being forewarned is forearmed and being ready for the pitch up made things a lot easier and it was no problem to add some forward stick pressure to keep the nose

where it should be as the flap lever is pulled. My approach was good with a good sight picture and approach angle I was reminded to hold the speed close to 55 knots to keep things stabilized. Task saturation was starting to kick in with so many new things to keep an eye on and while concentrating on keeping the speed on track I drifted from the center line a little. Things got a little wobbly and the turbulence from the tops of the hangers didn't do anything to help the situation. It is still a bit hazy but I think the instructor had to help out a little in the first few landings.

As I approached runway and crossed the threshold things went a bit further south. The second gotcha jumped out at me. The ideal being to bring the cub right down near the ground and then slowly roll the throttle right back to idle and level off, holding the nose progressively higher as the speed bleeds off until in a 3 point attitude for a soft touchdown. All good in theory anyhow. What I didn't know that I didn't know is that when the throttle is rolled to idle the nose wants to drop. This caught me out and since I wasn't ready to correct it, the stabilized approach was no longer stable. Even this short time later my memory is slight hazy but I think the dropping nose increases the airspeed and messes up the flair or something.. Subsequent landings I was aware of the nose drop and so were slightly better.

The landing wasn't terrible, the plane is still usable, We did a few small bounces, some swerving and the instructor had to put in some inputs, but we were down on the ground.

While we were still rolling I was told to add a notch of flap, throttle up, keep it straight and we went around again, for a few more times. It seemed to me that each circuit was slightly better than the previous. After three circuits we did a full stop landing and taxied over to the pumps and filled up. Since we were doing circuits we had initially taken off with a small amount of fuel. The only thing from absolute perfect weather would have been slightly less wind.

After filling up, stretching our legs and it was back in for a last circuit. After taxiing to mid field, it is a Cub on a 3000ft runway after all, I flew the whole circuit and landing without the instructor having to touch the controls! My airspeed control on climbout is much better and I can keep it closer to 60 knots all the way to 1000ft I do need to improve my landing flare and still haven't really worked out just when to level off for the perfect touchdown, but I am getting closer. I also am getting much better at keeping the plane pointed down the runway, the swerves are much less frequent and smaller. I am quite pleased with that improvement.

Overall I had a great time and look forward to my next flight.

EDIT: when typing this I completely forgot that I asked the instructor to demonstrate the first landing and he took over on final approach for the first landing then I flew the go around onward. Landing on the third try isn't too bad.:cool:
 
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blane.c

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Airspeed control is greatly aided by proper trim. Learning to trim for pitch/airspeed changes should become second nature and eases simple flying tasks like reaching for your map or supplement and other distractions. Make a change, trim for change. It should be as natural as any other aspect of flying.
 

blane.c

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For example the way to do a steep turn is to add some power as you roll into the proper bank angle and simultaneously pull backpressure to hold level flight. It is easy for human beings to adjust pressure to need, it is difficult for human beings to maintain a constant steady pressure. So to make a nice level constant altitude steep turn roll in some trim to hold altitude steady and roll trim back out when as you roll level and reduce power. It then becomes much easier to accomplish the rest of the task like time, heading, looking for traffic etc. because you are not focused on maintaining altitude the trim does most of that for you and much smaller corrections are needed less often. It is difficult at first to do this, as learning any other skill but soon you will appreciate the ease in which you are able to do it and the aid it is to your flying.
 

Kiwi303

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. My instructor doing all the radio calls for the duration of the flying. I think there is a radio course or similar that needs to be completed before learning to operate the radio, I need to remember to ask about what is needed for that to happen.
Here in NZ? Yes, the coast guard run the most courses, more boaties using UHF and VHF to call around on the water than hobby flyers. A LOT of the course is less how to use the radio than it is keeping clear and concise communication and what to do when an emergency call comes through so not to inadvertently jam or speak over emergencies.

I'd say it's somewhat annoying for emergency services trying to keep contact with a plane with problems to be constantly interrupted by an old fart gossiping with a friend about his wifes hemorrhoid operation as he flies along in tandem...
 

Mark Z

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Only one rule; keep it straight. Let the airplane do all the work for you. The key to a good landing is a consistent pattern and stabilized approach. Throw in hundreds of practice hours and you might get average. Oh yeah, there’s just as much to a stabilized take off in a taildragger that merits the same diligence as the landings. Enjoy the ride!
 

Vigilant1

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Sounds like you had a great lesson, I'm glad it went well. My own observations:
1) It may look stupid, but practicing the circuits by "chair flying" is a time-honored way to get comfortable in the pattern. If practical, tape a picture of your instrument panel to the wall in front of you. Sit in the chair with your checklist on your leg, imagine and "act though" each step of the lineup check, the takeoff roll (what instrument readings do I expect to see? When should the tail come up? What attitude should I set when I look out the windscreen ? Etc). "Fly" all the way around patten, vocalizing what you are looking for, etc. Add radio calls when you get to that part of your training. Again, you may feel dumb doing it, but it will help you get comfortable in the air more quickly and let you concentrate on the actual flying (rather than procedures) when in the plane.
2) Flying is fun and probably a good motivator toward your building. The way to save a lot of money is to be well prepared for each lesson. Read the items to be covered in flight, practice the procedures in your chair. Another way to save money is to take your lessons close together. I think flying 3 times per week or so lets students complete their curriculum in far fewer hours than if it is strung out to once per week or less. There's a lot of "muscle memory" involved, and infrequent flying leads to a lot of backsliding/re-covering old ground.

Have fun!
 

proppastie

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I would imagine the CriCri will be a lot more sensitive than a Cub.You will really need to get some time in sensitive 2 place homebuilt.
 

plncraze

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Find a pilot report on the your plane. Colomban's father in law test flew and he did it professionally. He should have something written somewhere. Then call some folks who have flown theirs. Cubs and Champs have some characteristics which a Cri Cri won't have. I bet you will really like your plane. It is 40 years newer than a Cub LOL
 

MadRocketScientist

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Airspeed control is greatly aided by proper trim. Learning to trim for pitch/airspeed changes should become second nature and eases simple flying tasks like reaching for your map or supplement and other distractions. Make a change, trim for change. It should be as natural as any other aspect of flying.
We didn't use the trim at all when doing circuits in the Cub, Stick forces aren't all that high if you know what to expect. The trim 'Wheel" is also somewhat awkward to get to, being right down beside the front seat.
 
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