Building in a tiny workshop? (Zenith 750)

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13x11' workshop for most of a zenith build?

  • No problem! Just move to a bigger space at the end

    Votes: 4 15.4%
  • It'll be tight, but not too bad.

    Votes: 8 30.8%
  • It may be possible, but a lot of tasks will be really rough

    Votes: 11 42.3%
  • Nope!

    Votes: 3 11.5%
  • No problem! Just move to a bigger space at the end

    Votes: 4 15.4%
  • It'll be tight, but not too bad.

    Votes: 8 30.8%
  • It may be possible, but a lot of tasks will be really rough

    Votes: 11 42.3%
  • Nope!

    Votes: 3 11.5%

  • Total voters
    26

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
7,290
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
Pistachio Scale ! When you can make one of those fly well, you're a modeler. I got the Peanuts to fly OK, but I never went to Pistachio. The R/C Pistachio size airplanes are just incredible, but they ain't got no soul :)
 

Riggerrob

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Messages
1,406
Location
Canada
How's this for building in a small workshop? 2nd floor Communist Poland apartment.

View attachment 55275
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When figuring out how to get airplane parts out through doorways, halls and elevators, width is the key factor.
For example, the shallow fuselages on Volksplanes look odd in he air, but make perfect sense when sliding through a typical apartment doorway.
If building a low-wing it makes perfect sense to only attach he turtle deck with Clecos in your apartment. Remove the turtleneck for transport to the airport, then reassemble at the airport with real rivets.

As for building a 13 foot wing in a 13 foot long shop, .... Start by bolting wing root fittings to one end.
 

mstratman

Active Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2016
Messages
26
Location
Forest Park, IL
I built a couple of 6 ft tables, and put them at an angle in the room and that angle buys a couple extra feet. I haven't started working on the wings yet (on the horizontal stabilizer at the moment), but hopefully that gets me the wriggle room I need.
IMG_20161003_204923.jpg

Shipping container would have been easier - maybe not cheaper especially with delivery - but I ended up building this shed:
IMG_20160927_141418.jpg
 

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
7,290
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
OK, I have another one of those reality check PITA things to consider.

Whether you like it or not, and whether you think you are going to be neat or not, the building process is going to create a lot of shavings, filing dust, aluminum toothpicks and splinters. Make a plan and take action NOW... cover the floor with something you can vacuum and sweep, put some kind of removable tape over any cracks and seams in themoldings, and tape up disposable construction paper or sheets on the walls.

Matter of fact, put corrugated cardboard or corroplast on the walls now, then put white butcher paper over that. You can write and sketch and draw flowcharts or whatever on the walls, make "to do" lists, ubildeer notes, measurements, etc.

In a small space you will be piling things up against the walls, stackimg parts and materials, shelving units, etc. The cardboard will help you not destroy your walls.
 

mstratman

Active Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2016
Messages
26
Location
Forest Park, IL
That's a great idea. I covered the floor in a couple layers of cork we found cheap at the Restore store. Been shop-vac'ing it every day or two with pretty good results so far. But haven't done anything about the walls yet, and should probably give them some sort of treatment too.
 

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
7,290
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
Please forgive egregious mis-spellings in the previous post. (sunburn, Beer, bad combination)

Please put all necessary effort into the Shop-Vac, aluminum splinters are not a good thing for dog paws! :)
 
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