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mcmurphy

Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2010
Messages
41
Location
Bucyrus, Ohio
I'm planning on building an airplane from a set of plans that I will buy. I was wondering how many airplanes I can build from that set of plans. Am I limited to building one airplane?

Let's say a buddy of mine likes my airplane and wants to use my plans to build one of his own. I'm not thinking of building multiple copies or loaning plans out, I just had this thought and wondered about the legal or ethical ramifications of building more than one airplane from a single set of plans.
 

skeeter_ca

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2005
Messages
1,027
Location
Yucaipa, Ca
Usually when you buy a set of plans it gives you the rights to make "one" airplane from those plans. The company you buy the plans from do sometimes allow you to make multible planes for an additional fee. Read the disclaimer from the company and it will say what is allowed concerning multible builds.

skeeter
 

bmcj

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
13,595
Location
Fresno, California
Most plans are sold with the intent of being used to construct only one aircraft (some even state that within the plans or purchase agreement). Plans are often given serial numbers for that reason. Legally, I'm not sure if they can really restrict you from re-use of the plans, but ethically, the right thing to do is buy another set from the person who holds the rights to the design and obtain a new serial number with it.

Now, if the plans are no longer available, I don't have an issue with using an older, used set; after all, there is no one to send money to (send it to me if you must :gig:).

You can sometimes find downloadable "open source" plans for planes that are no longer marketed by a company or individual, or for designs that are old enough that they have become part of the public domain. Just be cautious... some of the open source plans are incomplete, modified, or (on occasion) for a design that is still owned and marketed by someone. This last case (design still marketed) may mean that the open source plans violate "intelligent rights" laws.
 

Joe Fisher

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2007
Messages
1,379
Location
Galesburg, KS South east Kansas
If you build an airplane you can call it anything you want. Obviously if you used RV4 plans to build an airplane and called it a Robin Special it would be harder to sell than an RV4 but it could still be built to the plans.
I have the plans to build a Bordomfighter these plans are for a small all wood single place biplane. I want the performance this airplane is capable of with an A65 engine. However I have experience building all wood and I do not want to deal with the tedious details that are involved in building a wooden airplane. Building a wood airplane is frustrating and humbling it is much easier to build steel tube welding is much easier than gluing. So I have the Pitts S1c plans and I will basically build a Pitts fuselage and tail the same shape and size as a Bordomfighter.When it is finished it will look and fly just like a Bordomfighter but it will not be a Bordomfighter and I will call if Low Slow Joe II. S/N 1b4
 

mcmurphy

Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2010
Messages
41
Location
Bucyrus, Ohio
Thanks for all the answers. I just ordered a set of plans for a Thatcher CX4. I'll probably have a million more questions.:ban:
 

80RL

New Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2010
Messages
2
Location
Sergeant Bluff Iowa
Did you find a set of plans for the varieze yet? If not, I have a full set that I could make copies for you. I have no idea what the cost would be but I would certainly check for you. Let me know, thanks
Danny
 
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