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Boxer Diesel Weight

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flyboyjohn7

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Jul 22, 2007
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Anyone know the weight of the ee20 Subaru Diesel. If its anyway near the weight of an 0-320 I might install one.John
 

Rienk

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Oct 11, 2008
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Santa Maria, CA (SMX)
Anyone know the weight of the ee20 Subaru Diesel. If its anyway near the weight of an 0-320 I might install one.John
I've been trying to find out as well.
We have feelers out in England, Eastern Europe, and South America - but no word yet. If anyone gets ahold of one of these engines, I'd like to know.
 

billgood

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Mar 27, 2011
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brisbane queensland australia
Any update on this engine & weight?

I expect that Europe would have been using these engine in performance cars by now. There appears to have some modifications in the current production.
 

Dan Thomas

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Sep 17, 2008
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5,398
The gasoline-driven Subaru 2.2 is about the same weight as the O-320. The diesel, I'd imagine, would certainly be heavier. The high pressures in diesels demand a stronger structure.

Dan
 

flyboyjohn7

Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2007
Messages
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The only good bit of news about this conversion is that someone has designed an Engine Control Unit for diesels. Dont have the details here now but will post as soon as I find it.

Keep trying

John
 

flyboyjohn7

Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2007
Messages
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Any further advances with this engine. I believe there is one being installed in a Piel aircraft in France, but I dont have any details. Anyone know where to find out?

John
 

Head in the clouds

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Mar 11, 2012
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Gold Coast, East Coast of Australia
New member Kierie Pieterse from South Africa is still working out how to post pictures etc so he's asked me to post the following as he'd like more discussion about the Subaru diesels he's got for his timber twin he's building. Here's a link to his other thread which introduces the airframe

https://www.homebuiltairplanes.com/forums/wood-construction/12931-timber-tourer-spruce-diesel.html

From Kierie - " A few facts
about the Subaru Boxer diesel motor. It is a 2.0 l flat four horizontaly opposed motor. It has a common rail, computer controled diesel injection system. The system is virtually fool proof. If any thing goes wrong, it goes into "Limp" (safe) mode and it will take you home. I wish I can explain it better, but it is just to complicated for my few remainig brain cells. The diesel injection system has 5 injection cycles. Just before TDC pre- injection takes place, then bang, ignition, as the piston moves down 2nd mid injection takes place. Depending on accelerator pedal position, if cruising the post cycle will occur, if still accelerating the 3 rd mid injection cycle kicks in followed by a final post injection cycle. I was told that the 5 th cycle will probably never occur. So there is a continual pressure forcing the piston down. this system makes the Subie the smoothest diesel on the market. I was shown an article in an european mag. with a foto of a glass of water on the block while the motor was running (refs.?). You could hardly see a ripple on the water.

A few specs.

Weight.........:173 kgs......380 lbs ( the catalytic converter can be removed, safe +/- 5--6 kgs)
Height...........600 mm......23 5/8"
Depth............470 mm .....18 1/2" (front to back)
Width............820 mm......32 1/4"

Subaro power curves.jpg


DSCN0450.jpgDSCN0449.jpg
 
Last edited:

China Clipper

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Nov 27, 2011
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Location
Calgary, Canada
:ermm: Folks - Keep in mind that all is not rosy with Kerosene or JetA in airplanes. It weighs more per gallon than gasoline and, more importantly, you have to be cognisant of the explosive nature of the fuel in the tanks. Whereas gasoline fuel vapors over the fuel in the tank are saturated to the point they are not explosive unless injected by, or exposed to, air, diesel or JetA needs an active purging system to keep the fumes above the fuel below the explosive point. That's why some installations have seen cooled exhaust gases diverted for this purpose. I am not an expert but have read enough to raise the flag before one jumps on board the JetA train. Done properly, absolutely.
 

Dan Thomas

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Sep 17, 2008
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5,398
:ermm: Folks - Keep in mind that all is not rosy with Kerosene or JetA in airplanes. It weighs more per gallon than gasoline and, more importantly, you have to be cognisant of the explosive nature of the fuel in the tanks. Whereas gasoline fuel vapors over the fuel in the tank are saturated to the point they are not explosive unless injected by, or exposed to, air, diesel or JetA needs an active purging system to keep the fumes above the fuel below the explosive point. That's why some installations have seen cooled exhaust gases diverted for this purpose. I am not an expert but have read enough to raise the flag before one jumps on board the JetA train. Done properly, absolutely.
The turboprops I work on have nothing more than the usual non-circulating atmospheric vents that the gasoline-powered airplanes use. Explosiveness is related to flash point, and gasoline has a flash point of -45°F while Jet has a flash of +140°F.

The Cessna 182s using Diesel are using the same tanks that the gasoline used.

Diesel and Jet weigh more, but they go farther, too. That 182 with the SMA diesel used to burn 11 gallons per hour of 100LL, but it now uses 8 GPH of Diesel, for the same power. You don't have to fill the tanks all the way with Diesel to get the same range full tanks gave with 100LL if you are concerned with payload. The diesel engine installation does weigh more, however.

Dan
 

pengyou

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Apr 25, 2014
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Shenzhen, China
Is there any way to lower the height of this engine - for example, by reshaping the oilpan, etc It would be more useful if it were 20" tall instead of almost 24".
 

cheapracer

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Sep 8, 2013
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Australian
Be warned ....

There are multiple examples now of broken crankshafts and broken camshafts for the Subaru Boxer diesel even to the point that there are groups in Europe litigating class action against Subaru.

I think they have tried too hard to get this engine lightweight, which it's not, and are suffering the consequences. I would have great reservations about using it in an aircraft's high consistent rpm situation.

But as with anything, research this yourselves, I'm just some guy on the internet.
 

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akwrencher

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Oct 16, 2012
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Gustavus, AK
I'm no expert, and certainly no engineer, but that crank would scare me even before it broke......just not much there holding it together.....
 

cheapracer

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I'm no expert, and certainly no engineer, but that crank would scare me even before it broke......just not much there holding it together.....
It's the old story of Engineer's math Vs real World, the crank webs look scary razor thin to me as well.

In Subaru's defence and to give some balance, their gasoline cousins have proven to be fairly bulletproof.
 

akwrencher

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Oct 16, 2012
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Gustavus, AK
very true, I have always loved subie's, even though they don't get the best mileage. Used to have an 85 wagon, EA 82, high low gear box, that thing would go anywhere. Making a lightweight durable diesel is dificult ( say that ten times fast :) ) , it's almost an oxymoron. I hope someone does someday though, I really like CI engines. Maybe it's time to bring back the radial diesel, lol! Nice short crank :)
 

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