Zambrano Bocono I: Venezuela's first indigenous homebuilt airplane

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cluttonfred

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Here's a new one to me...Venezuela's first indigenous homebuilt aircraft. Note the summary below--1948 VW engine, Allis-Chalmers tractor magneto, silver doped satin fabric, galvanized mild steel tubing and a windscreen made from a Willys Jeep soft top! The result was a sort of low-wing, fully-enclosed Legal Eagle. Bocono II was a helicopter. Neat stuff!

Copia de Cutaway avión Zambrano Bocono  final.jpg Única-y-rara-foto-conocida-del-avión-Boconó-I-construido-por-el-Trujillano-Vicente-Zambrano.-Cer.jpg BoconoI.vlcsnap-2014-01-19-20h42m16s255.jpg

Cutaway Zambrano "Bocono I" first plane completely handmade construction, designed and built by the popular tecnologo Vicente Zambrano, Quie without any preparation in aeronautical engineering undertook the almost impossible task of building a plane with his own hands over there in 1964 although before He had tried but without success with a previous model little known, then rashly decides to take flight in it without pilot, his shock was greater than seen in the air, luck accompanied him and that adventure came out unscathed after colliding with a tree when he decided to descend without knowing how to land this machine, was a self-taught man, mechanic able to repair any machinery with scarce resources that had there in a small village section called "the Marshes". To motorized becomes a engine Volskwagen 1948, the same will makes the following modifications put to work the crankshaft on bearings and the original Delco electrical system and adapts the magnets of a tractor Allis Chalmers, tubular structure made of tubes galvanized, coated fabric satin painted silver and in the words of its creator "it was the best results gave" had wings braced cables, lacked a windshield as such for what use transparent plastic roof of a old Jeep Willys so it was very light, ideo, design and build all controls flight control, its landing gear was classic tailwheel, ungainly appearance and must have been very hot since they lacked ventilation in his little cabin. serve this modest schematic cut as a tribute to the almost unknown entrepreneur who already flies highest in eternity. in 1966 he donated his "Bocono I" to Aeronautical Museum FAV, only years later after damaged by the bad conditions to which it was exposed was rejected of the institution who as most do not appreciate the scope of that modest tecnologo and creator. Author Motocar 10/11/2016 Source: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,23005.msg292020.html#msg292020
Complete article (in Spanish with many pics and renderings, use Google Translate if needed): http://www.aviacioncivil.com.ve/el-primer-avion-autoctono-de-venezuela-el-bocono-de-vicente-zambrano

Documentary video (also in Spanish, use the settings button in YouTube for auto-translated subtitles if needed)

 
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lake_harley

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galvanized mild steel tubing and a windscreen made from a Willys Jeep soft top! The result was a sort of low-wing, fully-enclosed Legal Eagle
I'm surprised you haven't already ruffled Rockiedog2's feathers with that comparison.

Lynn
 

don january

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Wow, What a sight for eye's that don't hurt. I'll be back I need to get a eye drop or two. :gig:
 

AirAusquin

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Complete article (in Spanish with many pics and renderings, use Google Translate if needed): El Primer Avión Autóctono de Venezuela – El 'Boconó I' de Vicente Zambrano | Aviación Civil Venezuela ✈
Hi 'Mr' Clutton, it was a nice surprise to see my article linked linked at this post! I did have to stop researching for a while, and yesterday this theme did show up in several places, and a new search brought me here.

It does seems that Mr Zambrano was only able to make some jumps with his airplane. Unfortunately, the aircraft was scrapped while stored in a museum. Shame on them. I am attaching a picture of the plane in the Museum, alongside with a replica of an All Metal Flamingo, Jimmie Angel's plane.ElRioCaroni63.SDASM Archives.FlamingoyBocono.jpg

We have notice of two other attemps to make an indigenous plane in Venezuela, in 1917 (a Bleriot XI alike) and in 1919 (a biplane). Their story is here: Los dos primeros constructores de aviones en Venezuela | Aviación Civil Venezuela ✈

The first homebuilt to fly in Venezuela was a Mignet H.M.8, built by the manager of a bakery, in Caracas. He had a lot of help from an Aeropostale pilot living in Venezuela. It flew in 1934: El Primer Avión Construido en Venezuela en Volar: El HM.8 de Francisco Banchs | Aviación Civil Venezuela ✈

Best regards!

Alejandro
 

crusty old aviator

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Pretty rough looking, so I‘m not surprised that the museum tossed it out. I have the prototype CA-61 MiniAce that was on the cover of the November 1965 Mechanix Illustrated. EAA displayed her in Hales Corners for 15 years, but deemed her “too plain a plane” to display it in their fancy new Oshkosh palace, so she was hung in the ceiling of a maintenance hangar for couple of decades before they gifted her to a museum in Iowa. That museum eventually decided they had prettier planes to display and sold her. Two owners later, she‘s sitting in my hangar, waiting her turn to be restored and returned to the sky.
 

BJC

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Pretty rough looking, so I‘m not surprised that the museum tossed it out. I have the prototype CA-61 MiniAce that was on the cover of the November 1965 Mechanix Illustrated. EAA displayed her in Hales Corners for 15 years, but deemed her “too plain a plane” to display it in their fancy new Oshkosh palace, so she was hung in the ceiling of a maintenance hangar for couple of decades before they gifted her to a museum in Iowa. That museum eventually decided they had prettier planes to display and sold her. Two owners later, she‘s sitting in my hangar, waiting her turn to be restored and returned to the sky.
There are too many early, significant, homebuilts that are languishing in EAA buildings when they should be restored and displayed in the museum. It seems that display space priorities are for items that attract the general public rather than homebuilders. It is a nice museum, but it is not what I (long time EAA member) would like it to be.


BJC
 

crusty old aviator

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Yep, the prototype Smith Miniplane, N90P, is up in the rafters of the FAA pavillion...which is better than rotting into the ground behind someone’s garage. EAA had an auction once, selling off surplus assets. That did NOT go well with the donors, especially Marc Foose of B&F Aircraft Supply, who donated his Curtiss O-52 Owl to EAA with the proviso that they would return it to him if they no longer wanted it. The Yanks Museum in Chino bought it, restored it, flew it, almost burned it up, restored it again, and she’s again flying: happy ending for the Owl, but not for Foose & Poberezny.

Is somebody going to build a replica of this Bocano?
 

Riggerrob

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Sadly, museums and libraries have too little space to display their complete collections.
Smarter museums loan out extra airplanes (e.g. their third P-51 Mustang) to other museums. Sadly, many historical artifacts are too delicate to go on the road with touring exhibits.

Right now, I have a box of books about obscure old parachutes (packing manuals, history books, coffee table, etc.) that I want to donate to a worthy cause. I contemplated donating them to the Canadian Sports Parachuting Association, but some are way too old to be relevant for training new parachute riggers.
Then I contemplated donating them to the nearest aviation museum in Langely, British Columbia, but am not sure if they will appreciate the books' historical significance, since they tend to focus on RCAF and BC flying.
I also contemplated donating the to the National Aeronautical Collection in Rockcliffe, Ontario (a suburb of Ottawa), but shipping is expensive.
Yes, my collection of parachute books is more detailed that Rockcliffe's.
 

Riggerrob

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A replica Bocano looks do-able with modern materials.
Airworthy VW engines are readily available. Chrome-moly steel tubing is far more trust-worthy and Dacron cloth would last much longer. I would review balance and probably add lift wires connecting wheel axles (aka. fly Baby) to outer wing panels.
 

crusty old aviator

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I found Blake James’ biplane (the MacGregor from the CFB short, Blake) in an old apple warehouse in central Indiana several years ago. I tried to donate her to all the major museums and all demurred except for the Canadian Bushplane Museum in the Sioux, where she is now on display.
 

lr27

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Isn't welding galvanized tubing supposed to be very unhealthy?

I get the feeling that Mr. Zambrano must have done some studying before coming up with that airplane. The arrangement of the wires is a bit odd, of course. Maybe they were just for holding the wing in place, not to make it stronger. Or maybe they were just to stiffen it in bending.
 

Vigilant1

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Maybe I'm wrong, but the Bocano 1 looks like it would be a bit tailheavy. And the windscreen . ...maybe it sounded like a good idea.
 

crusty old aviator

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The design is strongly influenced by the Art Deco movement, and is similar to fanciful “aircraft“ that would be drawn on stationery, cards, ads, etc. in the mid/late 20’s.
I thought I read that she had crashed on her first flight, rebuilt, flew okay with some minor tweaking, but crashed again. She was later donated to the museum, so I assume he rebuilt her a second time.
With all that experience, no wonder he felt confident enough to design & build a helicopter. I never learned wharever became of that, though.
 

n45bm

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Pretty rough looking, so I‘m not surprised that the museum tossed it out. I have the prototype CA-61 MiniAce that was on the cover of the November 1965 Mechanix Illustrated. EAA displayed her in Hales Corners for 15 years, but deemed her “too plain a plane” to display it in their fancy new Oshkosh palace, so she was hung in the ceiling of a maintenance hangar for couple of decades before they gifted her to a museum in Iowa. That museum eventually decided they had prettier planes to display and sold her. Two owners later, she‘s sitting in my hangar, waiting her turn to be restored and returned to the sky.
I like that miniAce! got any pics to show? Thanks.
 
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