Small aerobatic biplane kit?

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by pequeajim, Feb 28, 2007.

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  1. Feb 28, 2007 #1

    pequeajim

    pequeajim

    pequeajim

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    I was cruising around and came across the FK-12 Comet biplane. I was wondering if anyone has experience with this aircraft?

    I am looking for an inexpensive experimental that flys with something like a 912, 3300, or O-200 engine. Not looking for anything larger.

    Something that can do mild aerobatics, nothing wild like a Pitts.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Mar 11, 2007 #2

    Joe Fisher

    Joe Fisher

    Joe Fisher

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    I realy like the Bordomfighter all wood construction A-65 engine http://adap.com
    You should check out Steen aero labs they sell the S-1 Pitts plans. Pitts him self flew the first one with only a 50 hp Lycoming then he built the Little Stinker that Betty Skelton flew to world wide fame with a C-85 engine with no inverted systoms flat bottom wings and only 2 alerons.
    http://www.steenaero.com
    And besure to read Bud Davisons pilot report on flying a replica af the first Pitts with the 50 hp Lycoming http://airbum.com/Pitts/PirepPittsReplica.html
    It will probibly give you a new attitude about Pitts.
     
  3. Mar 12, 2007 #3

    wally

    wally

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    If a plane is capable of wild aerobatics, then it certainly should be capable of mild aerobatics too!
    When I get flying my Pitts S-1C with 4 aileron wings sometime in the very near future, I will probably have some first hand info for you. Mine has 160hp on a plane weighing 745lbs empty.

    I have heard that it will fly just fine on an O-200. As a mater of fact, the "C" in S-1C stands for Continental. That is what Curtiss designed it for! The engine weight would make the plane at least 50lbs lighter.

    Nothing remotly complicated in building one either.
    Wally
     
  4. Mar 12, 2007 #4

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

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    Pitts is good, Acrosport suits too:

    Designed by Paul Poberezny as a successor to the EAA Biplane, the Acro Sport offers performance and excellent aerobatic capability in the Sportsman and intermediate categories. Purposely uncomplicated and straight forward, the Acro Sport design has been chosen by hundreds of schools for project Schoolflight programs. It has a wide landing gear which provides superb ground handling and easy landing qualities. Builders can choose powerplants ranging from 85 hp to 200 hp. Features steel tube fuselage, spruce wing and overall fabric covering which makes the project an easy one for first time builders with average skills. Maximum speed for this diminutive biplane is 180 mph, it cruises at 130 and stalls at 50. It has a rate of climb of 3,500 ft/min and a range of 350 miles. Info packs are $10.50 and complete plans are $125.00. Order from Acro Sport Inc., Box 462, Hales Corners, WI 53130. Free kit list on request.
     
  5. Mar 12, 2007 #5

    windair

    windair

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    You may want to look at the Murphy Renegade (65- 100hp). They are now offer the Rotec Radial as an engine option.
     
  6. Mar 12, 2007 #6

    wally

    wally

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    Hey I forgot about Murphy renegade. A friend built one several years ago. I watched some of the construction. He still has it and enjoys flying it. He did say that the advertised performance figures were a bit optimistic.

    It has a slick way of building the structure. The fuselage is mostly formed from 4 long aluminum tubes. The diagonal pieces are smaller square aluminum tubes. They have designed an extrusion that the long round tubes slip through. This extrusion has flanges at 90 degrees that the square tubing slips in to make the diagonal bracing. Then everything pop rivets together!

    The wings use aluminum ribs that are slipped over a retangular aluminum spar. They are also just pop riveted to it.

    Really nice setup.
    Wally
     
  7. Mar 12, 2007 #7

    PTAirco

    PTAirco

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    And then there is the Acrolite, designed for the Rotax 912. Looks simple to build and plans and material kits are available friom Aircraft Spruce.
     
  8. Apr 24, 2007 #8

    bmcj

    bmcj

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  9. Apr 24, 2007 #9

    pequeajim

    pequeajim

    pequeajim

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    Very nice looking airplane!

    I wonder how it would fly with a Jabiru 3300 in it?
     
  10. Apr 24, 2007 #10

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    It might be a little overkill, but who knows? The Jab is a good, reliable lightweight engine. The Jab 2200 might be ideal, but the 3300 may work just as well as long as weight and balance limits are observed. I know that the Starduster Too tended to be a little tailheavy with smaller engines, so if the V-Star follows suit, maybe the Jab 3300 would be an ideal engine. At the time the V-Star was designed, the Jabiru engines were not around so the typical engine of choice was the Continental C-85. I would imagine that there are some V-Stars around with O-200's or O-235's in them. I would also guess that the Jab 3300 might compare in weight to either of these two engines.

    There is a very active Starduster Forum at http://www.aircraftspruce.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=30 which you could join and ask that question. Though most of the members fly Starduster Toos or Acrodusters, there are several people there that are very knowledgeable about the entire line and some who worked for Starduster Corporation.

    Bottom line, though, is I think you may be onto something good!

    Bruce :)
     
  11. May 3, 2013 #11

    Holtzy3

    Holtzy3

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    sorry to revive an old thread but smith mini plane?
     

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