Scale ME-262

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David L. Downey

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Is it safe to say that the wing airfoils would be a modern high lift, low drag profile? and maybe flaps and drooping ailerons? it is indeed an interesting idea!
 

Speedboat100

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The Jetman flys and lands his plane/body the same no matter if the engines work correctly or not...that is under a parachute. I suppose a scale 262 would use a BRS the same way?
It would be the safest way ? Unless wingloading is very low...then it could be landed like a glider in a wheat field.
 

Aerowerx

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Not for your head...as the body would would still be in the very spacious room.
But you still have to get in and out of it. If the cockpit width at the top edge was 2 feet (just a wild guess!!), then it would be 1 foot at half-scale. And the floor to canopy height would be only about 2 feet (again just a guess!!).
 

Speedboat100

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But you still have to get in and out of it. If the cockpit width at the top edge was 2 feet (just a wild guess!!), then it would be 1 foot at half-scale. And the floor to canopy height would be only about 2 feet (again just a guess!!).

You have to open more than the glassed piece in a smaller Me-262.
 

mm4440

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Semi recumbent seat with legs stretching into gun bays. A true scale replica may not be practical. A turbofan powered HO-9 stand off scale replica might be a real cross country machine while a turbo jet powered one would be a fun, airshow type flyer.
 

Aerowerx

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Semi recumbent seat with legs stretching into gun bays. A true scale replica may not be practical. A turbofan powered HO-9 stand off scale replica might be a real cross country machine while a turbo jet powered one would be a fun, airshow type flyer.
My previous comment concerned a 1/2 scale ME262.

IMHO a 3/4 scale would be feasible, as far as dimensions are concerned.
 

pictsidhe

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The glass only needs to cover your head. The canopy could open a skirt over the fuselage, giving whatver opening you need.
 

Aerowerx

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Remember the idea of building a scaled-down WW2 fighter is that it will LOOK like the real thing, at least from a distance. Scale it down too far and you will have even more trouble getting it to look right, IMHO.

If the OP wants to determine the feasibility of 2/3rd scale ME-262, then that's OK. Let him. If someone else wants a half-scale, then that's ok too. But why make it more difficult for the OP?
 

Speedboat100

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If OP has money it is very ok to do 3/4 size...even 1/1 size. ½ size could be as cheap as a Cri Cri to make...if not cheaper.

1/3 scale looks like this:

1/4 like this:
 
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nicknack

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My previous comment concerned a 1/2 scale ME262.

IMHO a 3/4 scale would be feasible, as far as dimensions are concerned.
A 3/4 scale will definitely be big enough... the Japanese copy of the Me262 ie the nakajima Kolkata is 3/4 scale.
 

Riggerrob

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Stick with 2/3 or 3/4 scale for most of the dimensions, but bulge canopy rails outboard until they are wide enough for a modern pilot (thick leather jacket,etc.).
That is why I would be uncomfortable flying a WAR 1/2 scale Sea Fury replica. Cockpit rails are so narrow that exit is awkward when I (6’ tall and 210 pounds) wear a bulky jacket. I would need to rebuild the WAR seat back to accommodate a parachute and might even need to buy a wedge-shaped parachute container.
Why am I wasting time mumbling about pilot emergency parachutes when a BRS is the over all better system?

As long as you keep the replica’s silhouette close to stand-off-scale, few in the audience will notice any difference.
 

flitzerpilot

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I was intrigued to read these posts on the concept of a scaled Me 262, which I think is a very feasible idea. Whether one would consider metal, wood or carbon fiber/ composite construction is worth examining, but at about 3/4 scale size, there should be no problem accommodating a 'normal' pilot without increasing the size of the (single-seater) canopy, which would certainly spoil the look if not adhered to. My experience with 'scaled canopies' started with the sliding hood on a Yak 9 lookalike developed from the prototype Taylor Monoplane, which is a very small aeroplane indeed.

Realism was achieved by hinging a whole decking section, from the top longerons, while retaining the sliding hood for take-off and landing etc. I also lowered the seat to the maximum practical, to create a realistic relationship between the canopy size and the perceived size of the pilot's head. Most of my later designs have been open cockpit, but the same proportion applies if the chosen type is not to appear toy-like. This extends to the apparent size of the aeroplane when 'up close and personal'; parked on the ground. Biplanes, with long undercarriages, score well here in that you tend to look 'up' at the upper wing, whereas a low wing monoplane needs to be built at least to 83% scale in my view to have any sense of 'realism', depending on type of course.

I attach a picture of a pilot in a small biplane, the 18' span Flitzer Z-1 and the same the pilot strapping into the Taylor/Yak 9 cockpit in 1977. Helmet size can make or break the realism of any planned replica types, so one should consider that aspect in the scheme of things.

Z-1 taxying.jpg Yak start.jpg
 

pictsidhe

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That Nakajima has a smaller than scale canopy!
Flitzer, your cockpit thoughts echo what I am doing with my 2/3 Hurricane. I don't know if I'll need a skirt yet, but I am currently working on a mock-pit as time allows to finalise various dimensions and where to put the spar ect. It will be snug.
Anyone who has had the privilege to lean over a Spitfire will know that not all warbirds are big and imposing. I suspect that 109s are like that, too.
 
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