Lowrider 2 CNC Anyone build one?

Discussion in 'Aircraft Design / Aerodynamics / New Technology' started by addicted2climbing, Aug 18, 2019.

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  1. Aug 18, 2019 #1

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    Hello All,

    In the Ranger forum Fritz mentions the Lowrider 2 CNC machine which is made from 3D printed parts. At first I was skeptical that by using 3D printed parts that it would be rigid enough to cut accurately, but now giving it a second look. Anyone Build one and has one running? Have you tried to cut thin aluminum sheet?

    Curious.

    Marc
     
  2. Aug 18, 2019 #2

    Hephaestus

    Hephaestus

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    V1 engineering has a facebook page and web forum.

    I haven't built the lowrider - but I've done a fair bit of thicker aluminum cuts with my MPCNC 6061 and 2024. It's all about the bit the spindle rpm and feed rate...
     
  3. Aug 18, 2019 #3

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

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    humm, the same it true for machining any metal........
     
  4. Aug 18, 2019 #4

    Hephaestus

    Hephaestus

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    Yup just basically learning and sticking within what your machine can do.
     
  5. Aug 18, 2019 #5

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    We're slowly building one as a chapter project, it's just too easy to get side tracked (ie. I was delayed for two days making "mudflap girl" fan covers for my printer).

    If there's some design flaw with the Lowrider2 that makes it unusable for hobby level airplane building I haven't found it yet. And I'm not too worried about it, it's just a machine, it can modified to fix what ain't right.
     
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  6. Aug 18, 2019 #6

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    Hey Fritz
    My only concern with the lowrider is the reccomendation to have to base of the router as low as pissible to minimize flex. I would like to be able to use Clecos to hold parts in after holes are drilled than instal cleco than rout perimeter. Would need a long bit to clear clecos.

    Or just leave tabs I need to cut off after a sheet is cut but would like to avoid this if possible.
     
  7. Aug 18, 2019 #7

    Hephaestus

    Hephaestus

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    proppastie likes this.
  8. Aug 19, 2019 #8

    FritzW

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    To clear clecos you would need to have the tool sticking out of the router more than 2" ...more like 2.5". That's too long on any machine (tool flex). There are lots of tricks though: you could hold the sheet down with thin, double sided carpet tape and use a hair drier to to heat up the tape so you can remove the parts without bending them. Smarter guys than me will argue but... on sheet aluminum I just *tack the sheet down with 1/2" aircraft nails through postage stamp sized ply scraps, drill (cnc) the holes, pause the machine and tack the parts down through a few of the holes. On bigger parts I just hold the parts down by hand when it gets near the end of the cut (sounds dangerous but when you see it in real life it's not, it's really simple).

    *I posted some pictures of this somewhere on the HBA but I can't find them.
     
  9. Aug 19, 2019 #9

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    Side note:
    I'm replacing all the V1 Engineering logos with Klingon Empire logos ;) They put waaaay too many V1 logos on these parts.
    20190818_194540_resized (1).jpg

    Also
    I came up with a printable "611 plate" for a friend that has zero wood working tools. It'll work long enough for him to cut a proper plywood plate. ...I'm still working on the Y plate.
    Split 611 Plate4.JPG Split 611 Plate3.JPG The 8 existing bolts ought to hold it together. The Y plate is going to be a little trickier.
     
  10. Aug 19, 2019 #10

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    What material are you printing the parts with. Was thinking a glass reinforced material might be good. Do the instructions suggest print orientation and infil percentage?
     
  11. Aug 19, 2019 #11

    Hephaestus

    Hephaestus

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    The BOM lists the walls and infill.

    Most parts standard pla is fine. Many people to to carbon fiber petg. You'll end up replacing a part or two along the way as you learn and have oops'es.

    I went with a 1mm nozzle, did 2 perimeter passes, and 20% on all my parts. In most cases you get way more strength from wall thickness than infill.
     
  12. Aug 19, 2019 #12

    FritzW

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    According to V1 the 'factory' parts are PLA so that's what I used. The best print orientation is obvious from the part design, he did a great job with that. But if your not sure just zoom in on the pictures and you can see the print orientation.

    Somewhere I read that V1 suggests 3 wall layers and 30-55% infill. I used 15% gyroid infill (at 30% gyroid seemed way too dense). I'm printing everything in draft resolution, it's not as pretty but it's much faster and I suspect that's how the store bought parts are printed. ...black filament really hides low res print roughness

    PLA is plenty strong enough and it's very stiff. I don't think glass (CF) reinforced filament would gain you anything.

    There are already quite a few after market LR2 parts on thingiverse. You might want to take a look before you print anything.
     
  13. Aug 19, 2019 #13

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    Did you use the V1 electronics package or did you roll your own?
     
  14. Aug 19, 2019 #14

    Hephaestus

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    Pulled it together from my spare parts for the printers bin. Ramps 1.4 code and schematic was buried in a post on the v1 engineering forum.
     
  15. Aug 19, 2019 #15

    addicted2climbing

    addicted2climbing

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    Thank You Fritz

    Will have a look at thingverse. Found many mods for my ender 5 on there as well. I have a much larger format Trex 2+ at my work but im off on Paternity leave with a new 11 day old baby we just addopted. I think this leave will give me time to get all the prints done on the smaller format Ender 5.

    Marc
     
  16. Aug 19, 2019 #16

    litespeed

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    Marc,

    Congrats on getting a rug rat (baby), enjoy fatherhood.
     
  17. Aug 20, 2019 #17

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    Yeah, an 11 day old new baby won't take up much of your time. o_O <lol>

    Congratulations!!!!!!!
     
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  18. Sep 10, 2019 #18

    Radicaldude1234

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    Decided to see what the machine was all about...

    Ordered the hardware/electronics kit from MPCNC and printed the parts in PETG. The set up is mounted on a piece of 2'x2' MDF, which is in turn mounted on a welded steel tube table.

    Currently have the stepper motors connected to a Mini-Rambo controller and moving. Decided I didn't want to have a computer attached to the machine...so I bought a Raspberry Pi 3 for ~$35 and flashed it with CNCjs.

    With the RPi 3 connected to the house Wifi, I can manually control and upload gcode with any computer with a web browser...to include an iPad! Kind of surreal being able to move the axes with a tablet.

    Haven't cut anything yet as I need a longer power cord for the 500W spindle and have been too lazy to buy cabling.

    58853416094__A43CD64D-A0B4-4052-AC98-281F0B2A5517.JPG
    IMG_3004.JPG
    IMG_3008.JPG
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
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  19. Sep 10, 2019 #19

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    Any computer anywhere, or just one on your local network?
     
  20. Sep 10, 2019 #20

    Radicaldude1234

    Radicaldude1234

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    If you use port forwarding, you can use any computer anywhere. I use a similar system for my 3D printer called Octoprint and I can monitor progress on my phone.

    Both OctoPrint and CNCjs support webcams for you to watch the fabrication status. That's usually where those cool timelapse printing videos come from. My printer only has a Raspberry Pi Zero, though, which isn't powerful enough to control the printer AND stream video...so I'm thinking of also giving that system a RPi 3 or 4.

    If you're planning on using your CNC or printer over the internet, I'd be cognizant of having good security...as you may well know, this is one of the few times where a hacker could actually burn down your house...
     

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