Hurricane/Spitfire-type control stick?

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by cluttonfred, Apr 16, 2016.

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  1. Apr 16, 2016 #1

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Does anyone know what the advantage/disadvantage of the ring-type (spade grip) control stick used on British WWII fighters might be (Hurricane left, Spitfire right in pics below)? Maybe the point was to allow you to pull with both hands?

    Hurricane-R4118-restored-10.jpg a-view-of-the-cockpit-of-a-mark-1-vickers-supermarine-spitfire-136397796901703901-150427151729.jpg

    And not just on fighters, here's one from a Percival Prentice trainer.

    prentice spade grip.jpg

    It does seem to me that it would offer more alternate hand positions and easier changing hands than a conventional stick. Anyone every see one on a homebuilt plane and/or have dimensions/drawings for making one?
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2016
  2. Apr 16, 2016 #2

    Dana

    Dana

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    I suspect it's about alternate hand positions. Those sticks were also jointed differently from a conventional stick. For elevator the pivot is on the floor in the normal place, but for ailerons the pivot is in the middle of the stick so the top of the stick moves through a greater angle. Not a bad setup really, and gives more clearance for the pilot's knees in a narrow cockpit.

    Dana
     
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  3. Apr 16, 2016 #3

    wsimpso1

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    Spade grips were used into the jet age in Brit tactical birds. It does ease hand changes, which are needed a lot in those busy single seaters. And, as Dana pointed out, it also accommodates the big angular movement of the "broken" sticks common in Brit fighters.

    This was all before HOTAS became the rage, and while many of the things in the cockpit were not electrical.

    Sounds sort of like a lot of our homebuilts. Tight cockpits, manual devices, maybe a "broken" stick with a spade grip is a good idea.

    I have thought about this sort of thing for my homebuilt, but decided to build with pivots down low and a straight handle to start. New stick with a spade grip would be easy. They are all around 6" OD, maybe 3/4" tube. Easy enough to experiment with for shape, tilt, buttons, etc.

    Billski
     
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  4. Apr 16, 2016 #4

    Twodeaddogs

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    it was quite common in aircraft of the thirties and not confined to British aircraft. The early 109 had them for some customers and Russian fighters had them, too. Also has the advantage of a gloved hand fitting comfortably in them and usually found with hand lever brakes, common on British and Russian aircraft. Also used on shared-stick aircraft, such as Zeniths and my old aircraft, a Malmo MFI-9.
     
  5. Apr 16, 2016 #5

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Now that I think if it, this would a be great project for a 3D printer to then take to have cast in light alloy. Or I have actually seen some carbon-fiber reinforced 3D printing that might work well. It would be covered with grip tape in any case. Hmmmmm....
     
  6. Apr 16, 2016 #6

    Kyle Boatright

    Kyle Boatright

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    Can someone explain how the aileron control mechanism on one of these works? I've never taken the time to figure it out.

    Thanks,

    Kyle
     
  7. Apr 16, 2016 #7

    TFF

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    It's like a Cessna control yoke at your knees with a extension going up.
     
  8. Apr 16, 2016 #8

    Dana

    Dana

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    A sprocket on the aileron pivot connected to cables going out to the ailerons.

    The Quicksilver GT400 has a pivoting stick for elevator, with a modern yoke on top for ailerons (also common on many older planes). My friend had one; I always thought if I had a plane like that, I'd ditch the yoke, move the pivot down, and do a spade grip.

    Dana
     
  9. Apr 16, 2016 #9

    Lemans

    Lemans

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    Falcon XP use a 'broken stick'
     

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  10. Apr 16, 2016 #10

    Twodeaddogs

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    there are 3d printed Spitfire style grips available for simpit builders, to full scale.I saw at least one Zenith which has a y-type stick, which had a half-circle tube welded on top to become a spade type grip.
     
  11. Apr 18, 2016 #11

    Battler Britton

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    QUITE ALL JURCA design, very confortable

    114_1476.JPG



    113_1342.JPG
     
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  12. Apr 18, 2016 #12

    choppergirl

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    You can put your XXXXX through it.
    ...
    Thumb, you can put your thumb through it.
    What were you thinking?
     
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  13. Apr 18, 2016 #13

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Battler Britton, that Jurca stick looks canted forward in the second pic. Is that your plane? Got a drawing you could share, even if just a camera phone pic of a detail of the plans?
     
  14. Apr 18, 2016 #14

    Twodeaddogs

    Twodeaddogs

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    I put self-vulcanising tape, also popularly known as tennis racket tape, on mine. Gives great grip.
     
  15. Apr 18, 2016 #15

    Battler Britton

    Battler Britton

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    Hi, Matthew,
    yes, it WAS my plane, and yes, I got some drawing, but I'll be back home for one week at the end of june!!
    can you wait ? ;)

    268_popup_jurca-plans-tempete.png

    not cranted forward, just bolt aft of the spar and , on the picture, pushed full forward
     
  16. Apr 18, 2016 #16

    Battler Britton

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    The rounded triangular shape is very important for handle comfort. RIGHT or LEFT hand always with the good angle

    never find simplier and better!
     
  17. Apr 18, 2016 #17

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Hehe, yes, I'll manage to control myself until then. ;-) Let me guess, the black cat stole the Tempête and made his escape, like "La Grande Vadrouille," whistling "Tea for Two" all the way?
     
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  18. Apr 24, 2016 #18

    Twodeaddogs

    Twodeaddogs

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    admit it, you want a fighter control stick to make machine gun noises...
     
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  19. Apr 24, 2016 #19

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Who doesn't? And a big red button for the guns!
     
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  20. Dec 29, 2016 #20

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Are there any owners/builders/plans holders of any of the Jurca designs here on HBA? I am looking for the dimensions of the typical Jurca triangular spade grip to avoid reinventing the wheel. Just a quick sketch showing the tube diameter, triangle dimensions and corner radii, or even a cell phone pic of the relevant drawing from the plans, would be great. Thanks!

     

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