How to Complicate your Painting Task

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Kyle Boatright

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Help me come up with any other complicating factors I could have added when painting the interior of my RV-10 project today. I'm not sure I could have created a more challenging set of circumstances. In no particular order:

1) Painting outside under a tree. (Trees leak, um, stuff. They also drop trash and bugs.)
2) Painting on a 90F day.
3) While wearing a full suit, mask, gloves, goggles, etc.
4) Not remembering to buy enough disposable gloves. <Once a pair of gloves is completely full of sweat, you really need to change them or they start leaking water on your project.>
5) Using a double crossing, undependable, spiteful little spray gun.
6) Assuming that the T-storm a few miles away wouldn't cause any problems. (There was that one surprise gust...)
7) Did I mention being hurried by available light (or lack thereof)?

All that said, the job came out an 8/10. The areas that will be prominent look good. The other areas have a coat of paint.
 
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choppergirl

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Gloves, what are gloves? I never use gloves while painting. My fingers are always multicolored.

But I tried to use them today to keep gasoline off my hands. I hate gasoline. It seeps into your skin and is irritating and probably cancerous. I have learned one thing; don't ever wash your hands to get it off, let it's high volatility evaporate off naturally... it will smell bad for a long while but less will get into you. Washing your hands only makes your skin porous and then the gasoline goes right in. Wash your hands to get oil off, but not gasoline.

Does anybody have a clue how to put on those disposable hospital rubber gloves, because I have a box of them, and struggled with them for five minutes and finally gave up. I need to find a nurse to show me how to put those ballons on.

I don't even think thick rubber gloves are entirely safe to use when working with high voltage... your hands start to sweat fast inside of them.

~

8. You're not really painting until you're spray painting in the wind.... or painting with enamel in high humidity so it takes forever to cure.
 

TFF

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I have painted many a thing outside or in a regular garage. been lucky a few times with a paint booth but one thing I have noticed is that most pros in a paint booth have the same problems and still have to polish bug heads, just not as many. I also judge a home done paint job different. If you say you have a pro job, I go "We-he-hell lets see." You do it yourself, and the runniest dripping job start at 6/10 and only go up. Most get tired of doing rather than do a bad job. Usually quite good actually; doing lets you know where everything is; most pros miss details of stuff they did not do. My SD1 was painted outside the hanger I work at in the grass.
 

pictsidhe

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9. Inadequate compressor, preferably with an unstable regulator for added giggles.
10. Paint in a drought, so there's plenty of lovely dust in the air ready to stick to your drying paint.
 

Rockiedog2

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Dec 11, 2012
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That's all normal around here.
Painting is just one disaster after another and I grew up working in a body shop


Seriously, I know most get all in a wad over the safety stuff...the suit, goggles, gloves mask and all that stuff. OK. All I've ever done is wear a hardware store respirator and try to keep things ventilated best I can. In a cockpit like your 10 I like a small fan I can move around as needed. And outside it spreads around so much I don't consider it to be of much concern. The cheap Harbor Freight HVLP guns don't overspray much. That's about it. I know the hardener can be bad stuff if one gets enough of it...and I would be more ticky about it all if I was gonna make a career of it but us hobbyists aren't gonna get much with minimum precautions. I know I've damaged myself more with cheap whiskey that paint.
Well, that's my idea of that.
 

ScaleBirdsScott

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Uncasville, CT
9. Inadequate compressor, preferably with an unstable regulator for added giggles.
10. Paint in a drought, so there's plenty of lovely dust in the air ready to stick to your drying paint.
Or paint in a humid hole with that inadequate compressor, that even with the trap seems to fill the lines with moisture.
 

Aerowerx

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Marion, Ohio
Does anybody have a clue how to put on those disposable hospital rubber gloves, because I have a box of them, and struggled with them for five minutes and finally gave up. I need to find a nurse to show me how to put those ballons on.
Never had a problem with them. Make sure they are the right size for your hands. Your hands have to be dry. The ones with powder are easier. It also helps to blow them up like a balloon first.

I don't even think thick rubber gloves are entirely safe to use when working with high voltage... your hands start to sweat fast inside of them.
They have to be voltage rated gloves designed for the purpose. Then there are leather gloves that go over the top of them. We have them at work.
 

wsimpso1

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I have painted many a thing outside or in a regular garage. been lucky a few times with a paint booth but one thing I have noticed is that most pros in a paint booth have the same problems and still have to polish bug heads, just not as many. I also judge a home done paint job different. If you say you have a pro job, I go "We-he-hell lets see." You do it yourself, and the runniest dripping job start at 6/10 and only go up. Most get tired of doing rather than do a bad job. Usually quite good actually; doing lets you know where everything is; most pros miss details of stuff they did not do. My SD1 was painted outside the hanger I work at in the grass.
Reflects my view and attitude too.
 

wsimpso1

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Help me come up with any other complicating factors I could have added ... All that said, the job came out an 8/10. The areas that will be prominent look good. The other areas have a coat of paint.
Hey, your interior is painted, and everybody is happy. You do have to apply the appropriate standards to a homebuilt. If it is complete, sturdy, flies well, and you like it, it is a fine airplane.

Billski
 

BBerson

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Port Townsend WA
The splatter/texture paint works nice for interiors.
The lighting is usually good outside. I don't think I will ever paint in a closed shop again. But a roof is nice.
 

Rockiedog2

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Dec 11, 2012
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The splatter/texture paint works nice for interiors.
The lighting is usually good outside. I don't think I will ever paint in a closed shop again. But a roof is nice.
same here
I got a nice paint booth here. lotsa flourescents, big birdcage fan, filtered inlet. Used to shoot antique cars for folks(they had to get it ready) as well as my own stuff. Dust free. The airflow traveled from one end to the other and I sprayed from upwind and usually wore a mask but it really wasn't necessary, the paint traveling away from the gun. Nice.
Now I do everything outside or in the hangar with the big doors open. Can see so much better with natural light...all the difference. I just wait for a still day with OK temp. Humidity hasn't been an issue for me with the modern paints and we got plenty of humidity here.
The paint booth is full of junk and motorcycles now.
 

oriol

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Dec 31, 2009
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770
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Barcelona, Spain.
Gloves, what are gloves? I never use gloves while painting. My fingers are always multicolored.

But I tried to use them today to keep gasoline off my hands. I hate gasoline. It seeps into your skin and is irritating and probably cancerous. I have learned one thing; don't ever wash your hands to get it off, let it's high volatility evaporate off naturally... it will smell bad for a long while but less will get into you. Washing your hands only makes your skin porous and then the gasoline goes right in. Wash your hands to get oil off, but not gasoline.

Does anybody have a clue how to put on those disposable hospital rubber gloves, because I have a box of them, and struggled with them for five minutes and finally gave up. I need to find a nurse to show me how to put those ballons on.

Hospital rubber gloves are a must if working with Epoxy resin etc.
It is much more easy to put the rubber gloves if you put some talcum powder in your hands.

Rubber hospital gloves are not the best ones for cleaning or messing with gasoline, you better use thick scrub gloves like those used for dishwashing.


Oriol
 

Kyle Boatright

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Nov 11, 2012
Messages
934
Location
Marietta, GA
Gloves, what are gloves? I never use gloves while painting. My fingers are always multicolored.
Gloves are what keep nasty solvents like lacquer thinner, toluene, MEK, acetone, and others from entering your bloodstream through your skin. Ultimately, gloves protect things like your liver. You really, really want a healthy liver.
 
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