Continental 0-200?

Discussion in 'Firewall Forward / Props / Fuel system' started by Mike Armstrong, Nov 10, 2006.

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  1. Nov 10, 2006 #1

    Mike Armstrong

    Mike Armstrong

    Mike Armstrong

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    What does a new 0-200 cost and where could one be purchased from? Thanks

    Mike
     
  2. Nov 12, 2006 #2

    wally

    wally

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    Hi, I have a Cont. 0-200 on the front of my Cessna 150. I am eventually going to face the need for another engine too.

    I don't think you can buy a totally new one anymore - at least assembled and ready to run from the factory.

    I do think there are aftermarket manufacturers (and Continental) that make all the pieces though.

    A serviceable fresh overhauled engine is gonna cost about $7000 or more depending what else you get with it such as mags, carb, starter, exhaust, etc.

    If you plan on using it on an experimental aircraft, it is a simple engine to rebuild so you could just buy a runout one and overhaul it yourself. Or buy all the parts you need and put one together. It is 1940's technology at it's finest. A shop manual and parts manual are readily available and should give you all the info to do it. ESSO manuals has them (I think that is the name)

    You can build your own engine for your own experimental.

    You can start shopping by having a look at www.barnstormers.com for anything and everything airplanes. There are 0-200 engines and parts for them advertised there all the time.

    Oh, and expect to be looking for a new cylinder or two at about 600-800 hours. They usually start needing work about then.

    Hope this info helps.
    Wally
     
  3. Nov 12, 2006 #3

    billyvray

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  4. Nov 13, 2006 #4

    wally

    wally

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    Well!
    Guess that is good news, maybe it will help push the used prices down a bit.

    It is a very well proven and well liked motor. Just wish there was a way to add on another 15-20 hp at the same rpm without some magic potion or something. Every Cessna ever built could use more.

    Wally
     
  5. Nov 13, 2006 #5

    Mike Armstrong

    Mike Armstrong

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    Thanks guys, great information, I appreciate it.


    Mike
     
  6. Dec 31, 2006 #6

    JimC

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    Wally, LyCon's 9.5:1 pistons for the O-200 add almost exactly 10% to the power. This allows for about 8 more thrust horsepower. They also can take 0.007 inch off the 'bottom' side of the cam. With the O-200's 1.2:1 rocker arm ratio that will increase valve lift by about 0.0084 inches and will slightly increase the rate of opening at low lifts. And K-Parts makes roller rockers for the O-200. I haven't looked into the feasibility of changing the rocker ratio, but suspec that with roller rockers, you could probably get it up to about 1.22, which would give another smidgeon of lift. You can also use a 3-angle cut on the valve and seat for better flow, and there is a possibility of slightly increasing the diameter of the intake valve, but I haven't really looked into that yet. Many O-200 valve springs are 'tired', so a set of new springs might be worthwhile if you're noticing any roughness at high rpms (up near 2900-3000). With these changes you might also benefit from a C-125 carb (the 10-2848 in lieu of the 10-4115). You could also bevel the free sides of the throttle plate to reduce plate drag and increase manifold pressure. If you have the 'new' cylinder number or non-TCM cylinders, you can jack the timing up to 28 degrees on a certified engine and about 30 degrees on an experimental one. I don't think I'd go more than that if I were going to try to run the engine on premium auto gas, and even then I'd probably add about 15-20% 100 LL. At this point, you'd probably be putting out something on the very loose order of 130 hp at 3000 rpm. Getting an STC or 337 for the mods for a certified engine might be a chore. Great for an experimental though. I was pleased when Continental started producing the engine again. It's a great little performer. The stories about getting better performance out of the C-90 are a myth. Just use a flat enough prop to let you turn the higher rpms so the O-200 can turn up more power in the climb.
    All the best,
    JimC
     
  7. Dec 31, 2006 #7

    Wendell111

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    Be very careful when buying a used engine. If possible, buy from a repeatable aircraft repair shop and not any A/P that might be looking to make a buck. I bought an IO-360 from an individual that had a sign-off OSMOH and paid the going rate. I received a phone call from another person that had bought one of these engines. I had my engine tore down and inspected. It was total junk parts. Long story short, NINE people had purchased miss-represented engines. Even though the trio is now in process of going to jail I am still out $20,000.oo
    Buyer be-ware
     
  8. Jan 1, 2007 #8

    JimC

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    I'd rather buy a runout core and overhaul it myself under the supervision of a licensed mechanic.
    JimC
     
  9. Feb 26, 2007 #9

    Iskra

    Iskra

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    Hi guys,
    I builded an low wing all metal airplane and I installed a RR O200-A with a 2 blades wood fixed prop 70x41 inches.
    I tested max power at fixed point, before first flight, and engine reach 2400 RPM, I suppose this is biggest performance for such engine.
    When airplane is on level-flight at max power engine reach 3000RPM!
    Have anyone experience about this behaviour?
    Is it possible to damage engine at 3000RPM?
    Thanks in advance for contributions.

    Happy flights
     
  10. Feb 26, 2007 #10

    JimC

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    If you switch to a metal 7142, you can expect static performance (max power at fixed point) to reach about 2550 rpm. Level flight max power performance will be about 2950 rpm, which is what you are seeing. I see no purpose in running the engine at more than about 2640 rpm, and then only during climb. Running the engine at 3000 rpm for extended periods will shorten the time before overhaul is required.
     
  11. Mar 3, 2007 #11

    JimC

    JimC

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    Has anyone given any thought to stroking an O-200 engine?
    JimC
     
  12. May 2, 2007 #12

    Iskra

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    On my O-200 I have Cessna oil filter adapter and oil radiator installed behind cyl.2. Oil temperature sender installed below cyl.1 but someone suggested me to install it on rear of oil filter adapter so I checked oil temperature by external thermometer and I discovered a difference of 20°F more below cyl.1 in comparison on rear of oil filter!
    Has anyone experience about this?
    Happy flights for all.
     
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  13. May 2, 2007 #13

    bmcj

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    If this is for an experimental , you should also consider the Jabiru 3300 as a replacement in the same power range. If you are not familiar with Jabiru engines, they are Aussie built, 4-stroke, direct drive, air cooled engines that have developed a great reputation for power, weight, and reliability. The major parts are machined from solid blocks of aluminum, clean and shiny... truly a thing of beauty! The 3300 has six cylinders (smooth running) and is rated at 120 HP with an installed wieght of 180 lbs. They also have an 80 HP 4-cyl version (Jabiru 2200) with an installed weight of 132 lbs. There is an even larger 8-cyl engine (Jabiru 5100) in limited production.

    You can find out more on their website: http://www.jabirupacific.com or ask any of the many people currently flying behind one.

    Bruce ;)
     
  14. May 2, 2009 #14

    pomadom

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    Thanks for that Info.. Where can I buy 0200 jugs and pistons for my Jodel D11
     
  15. May 3, 2009 #15

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

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    Your prop has too little pitch. Ideal is to have redline at full throttle in level flight.

    The propeller and engine manufacturers usually call for teardown and inspection if overspeed is more than 10% for five seconds, or something like that. The O-200 is run as high as 4000 RPM on Formula racers, but that's with a pretty short prop. Your prop experiences centrifugal forces that increase by the square of the increase in RPM, so a 10% overspeed is a 21% increase in force that is trying to pull the blades off. NDI might be in order. Losing a big enough chunk of blade can tear the engine right off the airplane, and now you don't even have a glider.

    Dan
     
  16. May 3, 2009 #16

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

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    Don't know about that. I have flown a C-90 and several O-200s and found the 90 impressive.

    The C-90 develops its 90 hp at 2475 RPM. The O-200 develops its 100 hp at 2700. Since drag on a prop, or anything else, increases by the square of the increase in speed, we get almost 19% more drag on the O-200's prop than we have on the C-90's, and since drag is a drain on productive power, I can see the O-200 producing less net thrust than the C-90.

    Dan
     
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  17. May 13, 2009 #17

    ry151

    ry151

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    Can anyone tell me if the rolls royce 0-200 engine mounts exactlly the same as the continental 0-200? and what is the difference between the 0-200A and the 0-200B model? Thanks for your replys in advance.
     
  18. Jun 24, 2009 #18

    Volunteer

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  19. Jun 25, 2009 #19

    Digflying.com

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    A new Continental 0-200 will cost $20,455 which includes all of the accessories.
     
  20. Jun 25, 2009 #20

    Dan Thomas

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    Can't the rods already come really close to the camshaft.

    Dan
     

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