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Jay Kempf

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Believe it or not 1950 with a ton of upgrades a bunch done by the factory. Up close it looks like a new airplane. Or close to new.
 

litespeed

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Beautiful.

A rare diamond amongst the dross.

Hard to believe its a 69 year old.
 

Jay Kempf

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BJC, exactly. Light, straight, no damage history, hangared its whole life and cared for. So many mods including major panel upgrade in the 90s NO piano keys. Needs a Skybeacon and a stratus basically but nothing else. Had to wait for annual to finish to get it home. Needle in a haystack. I have been looking for the right one for 4-5 years.
 

TFF

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Now we are so use to the Bonanza and the used plane market, but when that plane was new, it was very expensive. It really was executive transportation. Like owning a TBM today. New it was about as expensive as three or four new172s. I fell in love when someone came up in a red and polished one ‘49 I think. So cool.
 

Victor Bravo

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That looks really nice, congratulations... has all the magnesium been gone through? I know that's the one big gotcha on that airplane. Our EAA chapter president has a '56 G model.

Did you get one with the little yaw skeg under the tails and the stamped reinforcement cufffs on the front of the tails? I don't know if those mods are mandated or just highly recommended, but I believe they are seen as important upgrades in the Bonanza community.
 

Pops

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Now we are so use to the Bonanza and the used plane market, but when that plane was new, it was very expensive. It really was executive transportation. Like owning a TBM today. New it was about as expensive as three or four new172s. I fell in love when someone came up in a red and polished one ‘49 I think. So cool.

I still have the picture of a new Bonanza that I took from the overlook of the ramp at the old airport thermal building at Pittsburgh, Pa airport in 1955. They are nice, but I like the Twin Beech B-18 and the Twin Bonanza better. Local friend of mine let me fly his 1966 Twin Bonanza. His father's company bought it new, ended up setting in the back of a hanger for several years with corrosion in the tails. He had it rebuilt and put new engines, props and all new panel and radios in it. Looked factory new. If you don't like how they fly, something is wrong with you :) Also helped on the maintenance on the B-18 sky-diving airplane in the next door hanger for almost 20 years and got to fly it once in a while. Also in love with the 18. I was going to buy a 1954 Bonanza in 1982, someone else beat me to it.
Heck-- IF it flys and will go around the pattern, I'm in love :) This is true--- When I was about 8 years old, I ask my mother why I liked airplanes so much, she told me, " a big bird pooped on a tree stump and the sun hatched you ". Sounded OK to me.
 
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Jay Kempf

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VB, all corrosion-X'ed and all good. And all original. I was there while it was still apart and on the jacks for annual. Not a spec of corrosion anywhere even on the flaps, ailerons, ruddervators, yadda. Early small tail version with no skeg, no skin doublers and no cuffs. I think the red arc is at 205 kts. E-185 updated to -11 205hp larger cylinders. Second version 3rd window mod done by factory a long time ago. Paint and interior done in mid 90s, hangared and babied since, still looks perfect for what it is. B model panel dual glide slope, decent king stack that all works, D'Shannon speed slope screen, electric aux pump, Still has the electric prop. Low time everything top end and prop done a few hundred back, 1300 SMOH at Mattituck I believe, 3300TT. The early ones are smaller, lighter, dry sump, pressure carb, smaller tail, originally it would have had that art deco panel and no third window. All ADs up to date. I intend to fly it as is. It's way fast enough for my needs. If you didn't know it was a '50 you'd swear it was more in the early/mid '60s from all the mods. Only real faults are a old LORAN autopilot and a single legal patch on the windscreen upper starboard corner and the somewhat dated velour restored original interior.

When I bought my 928 20+ years ago it was an adventure. Built a shop around it, learned a lot, met a whole community of enthusiasts. This will be the same. One of these has been on the bucket list for I'm guessing 30 years.

Equal amounts terrified and excited right now plus in that information overload phase right now. There are a bunch of high time Bonanza people around me so I have a lot of support to keep me safe. Reading the logs (3x full log books) is like a trip down aviation history lane. First entry at the factory in quill pen with perfect hand writing. Cracked me up.
 

Victor Bravo

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Sounds like you got a good one, congrats!

I am no expert on Bonanzas at all, but those little cuffs on the root leading edge of the tails look like a little extra safety and robustness for no weight and not much money.

When you get ready to look at upgrades, I believe a modern 3 blade propeller upgrade will give you pretty good bang for the buck. Is it the original electric prop that has the nasty AD or is it one of the early hydraulic ones?
 

Vigilant1

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I'm not knowledgeable about Bonanzas and I was struck by how much that Speedslope windscreen sleekens the lines of the plane. It apparently also improves access to the back side of the instrument panel, which can be a great thing.
It looks great, enjoy!
 

Jay Kempf

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The early tail is something like 7" less chord and all in front of the spar. That is why the cuff fixes the later models. If I do an engine upgrade I should do the fix. Other than that just fly by the numbers is the safe strategy. Full power down hill with the gear up is what fluttered tails off. This airplane has survived 70 annuals which is a good track record.

Early props are fine as long as you can get parts and before they aren't rebuildable anymore. So that is one to watch. Pretty simple and robust though as long as they have lube and nothing breaks or wears out. I actually like no hydraulics. Can't fail like the engine killing horror story shared on another thread.
 

narfi

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You should probably join the American Bonanza Society. They have a lot of good resources including a good gear inspection guide.

The beechtalk forum is also a good one to join. I dont think I've ever posted there but I've read a lot when researching problems.

I've worked on an a36 bonanza my whole carrier that now has 25k hrs of abuse off of gravel snow and mud on it. 18k since 2000.
 

Jay Kempf

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Been on Beechtalk for a while scouring the forums for stuff. Same with ABS.

That's a pretty good testament of abuse. They are rugged but how have you kept it from not corroding over that many hours?
 
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