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Can you name these old airplanes.

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Pops

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Some of the pictures I have. This is taken at Wert Field, WV. At the time is was the main airport for Charleston, WV. Down the Kanawha river from town several miles. At the time my parents lived about 3 miles toward Charleston.
The DC-3 on the field must be American Airlines by the AA on the wing. Can you name the other 2. The red brick building is still standing today. This is pre-ww-2 in the late 1930's. 1597006027950.jpeg

1597006027950.jpeg
 

Pops

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The building directly under the flying airplane is the main hanger and that is a railroad track going across the runway. (short runway).
 
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bmcj

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The one in the air has lines very similar to the Bell Airacuda, so I’m guessing it may be something in the Bell line.

The one on the ground has a Vultee look, but I think TFF might be correct about it being a Northrop A-17.
 
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bmcj

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The one in the air looks like a B-23.
Similar, but the B-23 fin is taller and pointier. Also, the plane in the photo appears to have a significant depth of fuselage below the wing (in other words, the fuselage profile is quite rounded and the wing mounts higher than the bottom of the fuselage).
 

cluttonfred

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I agree with the A-17, probably a retractable-gear A-17A because we can't see any wheel spats and definitely not an A-17AS because of the split canopy.

1024px-A-17A_36-0207_USAFM.jpg

The twin in the air could be a Martin B-10 or a Douglas B-18 Bolo, both have sharply upswept rear fuselages with big non-retractable tail wheels, I can’t be sure be which one.

FC525D4B-5414-4FB9-A18C-8514F7514D3A.jpeg

32DDE45A-3CE3-493E-81AD-39413395D9DC.jpeg
 
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Pops

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Its always been a mystery for me except for the DC-3.

I started being an airport bum at this airport in late 1945 when civilian aviation started back up at the end of the war.
Hear is a picture of airplanes at the field in I think about 1937 or 38. The front center airplane was the WV state airplane at the time.


1597014886043.jpeg
 

Vigilant1

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The tailwheel on the B-10 looks to be about in line with the rudder hingeline, while the tailwheel on the B-18 is farther forward, toward the front of the fin. The flying plane in Pops's picture appears to have the tailwheel in the B-18 location.
 

cluttonfred

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Hear is a picture of airplanes at the field in I think about 1937 or 38. The front center airplane was the WV state airplane at the time.
Very cool, Dan, thanks so much for sharing. My eye is always drawn to the little planes. That’s a Curtiss-Wright Junior in the middle, anyone know the open-cockpit parasol with a cowled radial next to it?
 

Pops

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Very cool, Dan, thanks so much for sharing. My eye is always drawn to the little planes. That’s a Curtiss-Wright Junior in the middle, anyone know the open-cockpit parasol with a cowled radial next to it?
Yes, I spotted that.
My flight instructor had been a flight instructor since 1937 at a large sea plane base in downtown Charleston, WV about the same time this picture was taken.
Most of the planes at the base were Aeronca C-3 on floats.
 

Pops

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The tailwheel on the B-10 looks to be about in line with the rudder hingeline, while the tailwheel on the B-18 is farther forward, toward the front of the fin. The flying plane in Pops's picture appears to have the tailwheel in the B-18 location.
I think you are right. B-18.

 

TFF

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That’s some well to do people in that last photo. The big Bellanca in the back is cool. I know someone that owns Curtiss-Wright Jr SN1.
 

Pops

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Picture of catching the mail in the next county east of me. ( about 30 miles away). Until 1950 there were just one paved road in the county and most county's in this area. So the mail drop was very important. The poles are still standing today.
I sure most everyone will know the airplane.

Bollinger_WV_46_mail[1].jpg
 
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Pops

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I looked the N # up. N18430 is a 1937 Stinson SR-9E, Serial # 5266 , exported to Mexico in 1948.
 

Pops

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Some more.

Picture of airport at Huntington, WV in about 1938 or 39. ( KHTS) Two twin engine airplanes on the right of the picture. I think one one is a AT-7 and the other at the edge is a T-50. Before WW-2 there was a lot of civilian flight schools teaching Army primary pilots in this area. Old friend of mine was an instructor teaching students in Stearmans as a civilian instructor at KROA. He said he had the scars to prove it :)









1597023182825.jpeg
 

Vigilant1

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The planes in these pictures are great, but what is more impressive is the topography. From what I've seen, that's about every square foot of "flat' that exists in West Virginia.
 
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