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Can you name these old airplanes.

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flitzerpilot

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Absolutely correct, Kyle. It's a DC-2. The more slender fin and narrower fuselage are giveaways. The Douglas machine in the air was called a 'Digby' in RAF service. I recognized the Northrop but would have to research the designations.
Lynn
 

Victor Bravo

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Wow... you guys are good. My hat's off to the folks recognizing so many little details and ID'ing oddball airplanes. I agree with the B-18 call on the flying airplane.
 

billyvray

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Newnan, GA
Man, some of these interwar bombers were absolutely ugly. I love them, cause they are still awesome and show the learning process that designers and builders were going through before the successful versions were arrived at (DC-3, B-17, etc). Thanks for the pics.
 

CRG

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I wonder if something is off there, as I thought SR-9s to be the only Reliants in the series to have wrapped rather than flat panel windscreens.

I looked the N # up. N18430 is a 1937 Stinson SR-9E, Serial # 5266 , exported to Mexico in 1948.
 

Pops

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IF WV was spread out flat, it would be bigger than Texas. :)

Look at it this way, if you buy 10 acres of land and it on a 45% angle, you get more land.
 
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Pops

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I'm convinced the DC-3 is actually a DC-2.
I think you are right. Narrow fuselage of the DC-2.

This is a picture of a C-47 that didn't get stopped at the end of the runway and looks like the pilot ground looped it and almost stopped on RT-25. He was landing on the shorter runway that went across the valley and Kanawha river. This was in 1943. At the beginning of the war the BF Goodrich plant was built to make aircraft tires for the war. The people are standing on the state Rt-25 and it's not paved.
My uncle worked at the Rubber plant at the time and had a small grocery store near by. Living in the lower end of Dunbar about 3 miles away , we would catch the "Rubber Plant " bus to ride into downtown Charleston.



Wertz_WV_43Jul_C-47[1].jpg
 
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Riggerrob

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Dear Kyle Boatwright,
You have good eyes.

The parked twin looks like a Douglas DC-2 with its flat fuselage sides and simple fin.

The twin flying overhead is a Douglas Digby bomber. Digbys were mostly built with DC-2 parts. The belly was bulged to hold bombs (ala. Lockheed Hudson). Most Digbys got dorsal turrets but forward-firing guns were had-aimed from the nose. Digby was obsolete at the start of WW2, but the RCAF still bought a few Digbys and used them to patrol approaches to Halifax harbour.

The parked single is a Northrop A-17 bomber .. another airplane that was obsolete by the start of WW2. The RCAF also bought a few A-17s, but primarily used them to tow targets at BCATP airfields in Ontario. Target-towing A-17s were painted in garish black and yellow, diagonal stripes. The Norwegian Air Force in exile also flew A-17s in Canada. Norwegians even flew a few A-17s on floats. ... again primarily from BCATP fields in Canada.
 

cluttonfred

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I don't mean to hijack this thread, but since we've got so many folks looking at old airplanes, any idea what the silver knob and red-handled crank on the floor are in the cockpit photo of the Nicolas-Beazley NB-8G?

NB-8G cockpit detail.jpg
 

Kyle Boatright

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Marietta, GA
Absolutely correct, Kyle. It's a DC-2. The more slender fin and narrower fuselage are giveaways. The Douglas machine in the air was called a 'Digby' in RAF service. I recognized the Northrop but would have to research the designations.
Lynn
For me, the -2 has a different wingtip profile from that aspect.
 
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