Another weird one for those who love them

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Rhino

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Back when they thought it was only a few years until everyone had a flying car in their garage. A lot of funky aircraft came out of the late 40s and early 50s, but some of them were just great (Cub).
 

Pops

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Our lifestyle was changing very fast in the post WW-2 years. A lot of people in rural America was just getting electricity and paved roads. So a lot of people expected the change to continue. So they were thinking flying cars , etc, in the near future.
After the post war boom was over there hasn't been much change except for the computer.
Look at the change between 1900 and 1950. Completely different in most ways. Time travel a person from 1900 to 1950 and most everything would be different. Then a person from 1950 to today. No much difference, a person could get in todays automobile and drive away, not much change from the 1950 model he had been driving. The only big change is the computer. The life style from 1900 to 1950 was a big change, from 1950 to today, not so much. Ask yourself the big question, WHY.

Story.
My mother and father was born in 1910. My wife's mother and father was 1905 and 1897. My parents said they can remember seeing their first auto and airplane. My parents would never fly on an airplane. One day when my father ( when he was 83 years old) and I was driving past the airport where I kept the Piper Cherokee, I needed to get something out of the hanger. Perfect day, and I ask him about going for a ride. He said OK, huge surprise for me. We flew about an hour and he even held the control wheel. He always like cars and motorcycles when he was younger and one day him and his friends was riding their motorcycles, they stopped by the airport to take a ride in a new Culver Cadet that one of them had just bought. Another went first, he watched them crash and get killed turning base to final. He would never ride in an airplane and always against me having anything to do with airplanes.
After the hours flight, he almost cried. He said I have been missing this all of my life because of my fear. He couldn't wait to tell almost everyone he knew.
 
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scramjetter

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I liked your story! Pops, the next 100 years will see more change than humans have ever experienced, at least since the Neanderthals disappeared and we weren't the only intelligent hominids. Routine space travel and industry, artificial intelligence, custom on-demand gene splicing; the world will be completely unrecognizable for anyone reading this.

My mother saw her friend die on a motorcycle, nothing gruesome not even a scratch, just knocked his head and he died. So I couldn't have one until after I left the house and even then she didn't want me riding it home. I had gotten my private pilot cert before the motorcycle and strangely she was OK with that but the bike, no way. I wish I could get my father to fly with me because I don't know how many years he has left. At least I got him to sail with me. The funny thing is, I was always scared of sailing over the horizon so it kept me back, now I do it without much thought. He just didn't like to sail because he got becalmed once in a sailboat without a motor and no oars. It's funny what keeps us in the comfort zone.

Our lifestyle was changing very fast in the post WW-2 years. A lot of people in rural America was just getting electricity and paved roads. So a lot of people expected the change to continue. So they were thinking flying cars , etc, in the near future.
After the post war boom was over there hasn't been much change except for the computer.
Look at the change between 1900 and 1950. Completely different in most ways. Time travel a person from 1900 to 1950 and most everything would be different. Then a person from 1950 to today. No much difference, a person could get in todays automobile and drive away, not much change from the 1950 model he had been driving. The only big change is the computer. The life style from 1900 to 1950 was a big change, from 1950 to today, not so much. Ask yourself the big question, WHY.
 

Yellowhammer

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Our lifestyle was changing very fast in the post WW-2 years. A lot of people in rural America was just getting electricity and paved roads. So a lot of people expected the change to continue. So they were thinking flying cars , etc, in the near future.
After the post war boom was over there hasn't been much change except for the computer.
Look at the change between 1900 and 1950. Completely different in most ways. Time travel a person from 1900 to 1950 and most everything would be different. Then a person from 1950 to today. No much difference, a person could get in todays automobile and drive away, not much change from the 1950 model he had been driving. The only big change is the computer. The life style from 1900 to 1950 was a big change, from 1950 to today, not so much. Ask yourself the big question, WHY.

Story.
My mother and father was born in 1910. My wife's mother and father was 1905 and 1897. My parents said they can remember seeing their first auto and airplane. My parents would never fly on an airplane. One day when my father ( when he was 83 years old) and I was driving past the airport where I kept the Piper Cherokee, I needed to get something out of the hanger. Perfect day, and I ask him about going for a ride. He said OK, huge surprise for me. We flew about an hour and he even held the control wheel. He always like cars and motorcycles when he was younger and one day him and his friends was riding their motorcycles, they stopped by the airport to take a ride in a new Culver Cadet that one of them had just bought. Another went first, he watched them crash and get killed turning base to final. He would never ride in an airplane and always against me having anything to do with airplanes.
After the hours flight, he almost cried. He said I have been missing this all of my life because of my fear. He couldn't wait to tell almost everyone he knew.


Pops,

Very nice story. I appreciate you sharing it with us.

I was fortunate enough to have been raised by my grandmother. She was a child of the great depression as was my grandfather who passed away when I was three years old. My grandmother and i were very close and she would always tell me about the American way of life back then before all of the amenities of life came to be.

I was and still am fascinated with that time period. My grandmother recalled the advent of the airplane, television, space travel, nuclear weapons/energy, automobile travel, refrigerators, and even the personal computer just to name a few.

Most people today and especially our youth can not even fathom having to go to town in a horse and buggy to get a block of ice and bring it home to put it in the :"Ice box" located in a deep hole under ground. Lined with wood and tin of course.

We take so much for granite these days. Ice cubes and air conditioning were unheard of back then. I often wondered how they made it. My grandmother always said you cannot miss something that doesn't exist.

My grandmother was old school without a doubt. We wasted nothing in our home. If I was eating a bowl of Raisin Bran or rice or anything, you can best believe not one raisin, bran, or peice of rice was left in the bowl. "Waste not want not" she would say.

And my personal favorite quote of hers was, "just because something is old, doesn't mean it's not any good" as I would find myself complaining about one of our 1940-1950's era tractors. She was right.

Man what a time to be alive. The good ole days. I thank God often to have been raised by her.

I could go on all day citing examples.

-Yellowhammer
 

Yellowhammer

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As far as change in general, I know that certain factions of our government and military have developed technology that would positively change our ways of living forever. They choose not to share it with the general public because that's not what they are interested in. There could be change on par with the first half of the last century but it is all wrapped up in back government project that won't see the light of day for many years to come. If ever.

If the American public truly knew about the real technology we have developed and not the "modern" things we have today which is just the crumbs from what is really available we would have a revolution overnight.

Sadly, we are plagued by the Bread and Circuses generation. People that want to be told what to do and what to think.. Individuals that think they are entitled to anything and everything.

Oh and our nations currency is Fiat. Backed by nothing and one wonders just how long before the bubble bursts.

Now lets fo FLY!
 
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Vigilant1

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Our lifestyle was changing very fast in the post WW-2 years. A lot of people in rural America was just getting electricity and paved roads. So a lot of people expected the change to continue. So they were thinking flying cars , etc, in the near future.
After the post war boom was over there hasn't been much change except for the computer.
And, I'd add cellular/wireless "phones" to the short list of recent things that have changed daily life fundamentally.
When I was a kid, a pack of us would go play in the hills all day, away from every adult. Other times, I would take the dog out and be gone in the hills, entirely unreachable to communicate with anyone, until I returned many hours later. This was not unusual at all in my suburban neighborhood for kids older than about 10.
My daughter, now 30, has never experienced a time when she couldn't instantly and reliably get in touch with others. And, since she's been about 18 she's been able to look up almost anything, anywhere, any time. I do think growing up this way changes how we think of ourselves and others.
My wife's dad grew up on a farm in rural Mississippi. They had no electricity (before the TVA/REA) and his dad didn't want it ("too expensive"). On this, Granny put her foot down, and they got electricity. Anyway, to hear it from my wife's dad, growing up on a dirt poor farm in the rural south with no indoor plumbing was nearly an ideal existence.
I do think that experiencing true want changes a person. Yes, it encourages thrift. But I think, given the right circumstances, it also fosters gratitude. Gratitude/thankfulness is the personality trait that researchers have found to be most tightly associated with happiness. That matches what I've seen.
 
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jedi

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Walker Morrow was family friend who authored two books about his life in the Detroit area and his semi aviation experiences. I found his "A Child of the 20th Century" to be interesting as to the changes that took place in his lifetime. I have not read his "The Metalclad Airship : ZMC 2" but as I now think about it I probably should.

"December 7, 1903: the Twentieth Century was just three years of age. On that day no living person had ever seen an airplane in the sky, or heard a voice on the radio, or seen a concrete highway. Nor had anyone seen a television screen, and only a few had seen an automobile - an impractical horseless carriage of no useful value to any sensible person, a freakish toy for a handful of reckless fellows with nothing more sensible to do. And a man on the moon? Insane. The century was on the very threshold of these things (and many more) that everyone today accepts as normal parts of life, with never a thought of the why or wherefore. The writer of this story, born on that day, saw them come to pass. He worked with and knew many of the men who helped create those wonders and tells the story of a child and man growing up in the Twentieth Century."

"The ZMC-2 (Zeppelin Metal Clad) was the world's first and only metalclad airship, constructed for the US Navy between 1927 and 1929 by the Detroit Aircraft Corporation and in service until 1941. "

You may find a copy thru the library system.

A Child of the 20th Century: Morrow, Walker C.: 9780962866807: Amazon.com: Books
The Metalclad Airship : ZMC 2
 

Chilton

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The Portsmouth Aerocar inspired the Miles Aerovan which inspired the Shorts Brothers Skyvan, my all time most favouritest skydiving airplane.
Since the Miles Aerovan flew in January of 1945 and the Portsmouth Aerocar not until 1947 I suspect the inspiration may be the opposite way around!
 

bmcj

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a person could get in todays automobile and drive away, not much change from the 1950 model he had been driving.
What are these straps hanging beside the seats, why can’t I turn the key until I step on the brake pedal, and where’s the #%+*<€ clutch?
 

Pops

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Automatic transmissions came out before 1950. I drove a 1948 Chrysler with fluid drive. Had a clutch for low and reverse. I think the first seat belts was an option in the 1957 Fords.
 

scramjetter

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The Skyvan is really cool, I'd love to jump out of something like that. I can't help but wonder if its square fuselage was designed around carrying a specific vehicle payload? Or maybe just easier to seat passengers?

The Portsmouth Aerocar inspired the Miles Aerovan which inspired the Shorts Brothers Skyvan, my all time most favouritest skydiving airplane.
 

Dan Thomas

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Back in around 2005 an old local fellow passed away. He was 104. Someone had asked him what the biggest changes were that he'd seen; as a farmer, he of course mentioned the combine. One man could harvest a quarter-section in a few hours, maybe with a truck and driver standing by. When he was a kid, threshing machines were primitive things, powered by a long belt off a steam-driven tractor, that needed a huge crew to operate both tractor and thresher, and a few wagons with horses and a bunch of guys to pick up the stooks and cart them to the thresher and feed them in. And that's after another crew had cut the grain and stooked it to dry some days earlier. Then it took wagons to cart the grain to the granary, and more wagons to the elevator some miles away.

Not too many years before that, harvesting and threshing was done pretty much entirely manually. Just imagine what your loaf of bread would cost now without all those machines, fertilizers and pesticides and herbicides. Most people have no idea.

A couple of times I flew from western Canada to Winnipeg on the airlines. A few times to Toronto. Trips of a few hours between Toronto or Winnipeg and Calgary. I would look down from six miles up at the land that the early settlers crossed, largely on foot, with an ox pulling a wooden cart or a wagon, making a handful of miles per day unless the weather turned sour. There were various lethal hazards like wild animals, venomous snakes, thunderstorms, windstorms, and so on, and the fatality rate was significant. There were rivers to cross, deep gullies in the way, mud, dust, bugs. And then I'd complain that the airline seat was cramped, that the coffee was poor, that the kid in the next seat wouldn't stop screaming, that the flight was a half-hour late, and suddenly realize what I was saying.

Young Americans should consider the migrants between St. Louis and Portland, OR on the Oregon trail. Six months of misery and death. Arriving in a cold rain, maybe snow, with nowhere to live. Big scramble to put up some sort of shelter. And read this book:

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Rinker Buck earlier wrote this one:

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Dana

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The Skyvan is really cool, I'd love to jump out of something like that. I can't help but wonder if its square fuselage was designed around carrying a specific vehicle payload? Or maybe just easier to seat passengers?
I read somewhere that it was designed to carry vehicles of the VW Microbus size.
 

Pilot-34

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The Information Age.
It’s transformed our lives mostly due to the Internet which is as far as I can tell the only useful invention since 1950.
But remember just because they didn’t have a certain technology in 50 does it mean they didn’t have a way.
My aunt tells me that As a child she could write her grandmother a letter sing May I come over for afternoon tea. And her grandmother could write back no I’m busy this afternoon why not come over for lunch.
Mail 7 times a day!
FedEx overnight ? Lol Way too slow, if you lived on the same rail line as a fast RPO service With a telegram and RPO delivery grandpa got parts delivery from 50 miles away in as little as 45 minutes!
 

Pops

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Grandfather and I got electric in the summer of 1950. The county bought the right-a-ways for a road out the ridge and made a real gravel road and the electric company ran a line out the ridge. No more walking the 7 miles to a road and now easy to take the farm wagon. ( grandfather never drove a car), Horses only. Flat rate of $3 a month for a 60 amp box with two fuses with a light bulb hanging down in each room. Lot of money at that time for us. Like going to heaven. Also saw my first TV that year. (Boxing). One channel that came on at 5 PM and went off at 10 pm. We still had the battery powered radio for Saturday nights. Also had a mailman that rode horse back. He had a 20 mile circle and changed horses at Went Casto's barn after crossing 18 mile creek. Latter he started using a surplus WW-2 Jeep but still had to take the horse for the creek crossing when the creek was up. I use to swim Old Joe ( 2 year old wild Stallion that grandfather bought in 1948) across the creek when it was up. About 200' wide when it was up and the crossing was just about 2' deep when normal. W. Casto and my father were first cousins. Everyone in that area was my family in one way or another.

Looking back, even through we were poor, those were the best days. I was blessed.

Dan R.
 
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