AC Crashworthiness Online Book 400+ Pages

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aviast

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This looks like a good reference. Thanks for the pointer!

I once attended a seminar on aircraft design by C.W. "Bill" Whitney (designer of the Whitney Boomerang and Seabird Seeker, among others). He was very interested in designing for crashworthiness and emphasised this in his presentation. To be honest I hadn't really thought about this before but he left me in no doubt that this is a very important aspect of aircraft design.
 

Apollo

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Aircar

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That seems to be about the only document to have come out of the AGATE program to be available for public use -- David Thurston "Design for safety" is another good book on crashworthiness (if you insist on landing on a hard unyielding surface every time then I suppose it is only sensible to design for an impact without any round out )

. Where is SUSVSteve lately ? this is his forte' -- hopefully the demand to have vehicle to vehicle impact survivability, as in automobiles, (at the cost of immense weight penalty) will not come into aviation as a by product of some 'well intentioned' do gooder .
 

Aircar

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"Fool"? (everyone called him by that name shortly before.....)

The cover of the Book shows a very detailed finite element mesh including the highly detailed cowling -- I would think it to be a bit of overkill to model the non structural engine cowls when in fact the big solid engine and it's mounts within have everything to do with the non-crumple zone up front.
 

Jimstix

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Very timely stuff. Most of the early work on biomechanics was done in the late 1940s to late 1950s by Col. John Paul Stapp, MD at Edwards and Holloman AFB. The good doctor was working on aircraft crash and ejection survivability but found that most GIs were being injured in auto crashes. This got him interested seat belts for cars. He is largely responsible for mandated seat belts in American cars and for many years the Stapp Automotive Crash Safety Symposium was held in Detroit. Stapp was a “lead from the front” kind of guy – he would try the dangerous human tests first before allowing any volunteers to ride the rocket sled or the impact tests on the air-powered sleds. Good news! He died of old age in 1999. John Stapp - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Aircar

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Interesting stuff. We had compulsory seat belts next after the Swedes I think and the person responsible ( A professor Joubert, was an aviation researcher also ) BTW Jimstix -can you tell us what your Avatar actually is ? -looks menacing and faintly like the front of an F35 ...
 

Jimstix

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Aircar, The avatar photo is of an F-22 forebody mounted on a rocket-powered sled for testing ejection seats. The canopy has not been fitted for this test. Just high-tech crash test dummies ride the seats.

Cheers, Jimstix
 

BBerson

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Last night on NPR, an astronaut described his Soyus reentry (controlled vertical crash).
He said they mold a custom seat to fit his butt and torso exactly and straps restrain legs. They must keep mouth shut to avoid bitting off tongue.
 

Jimstix

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Aircar,
The Swedes (SAAB) did perform many seat belt tests at the Holloman Aero-Medical Test Facility using the air-powered deceleration sled track while Dr. Stapp was in command. The air powered track was know as the "Daisy Track" and operated from the mid-1950's to 1969.(The name came from a popular American air rifle was known by it manufacturers name "Daisy") In 1969 the Daisy Track was mothballed and the staff went to Wright-Patterson AFB Ohio USA. Of great interest to the engineers and technicians were the female Swedes that rode the sled and were then photographed for bruising - across the hips (lap belt) and across the chest (shoulder belt). The pirated photos are quite the collectors item - all properly marked as documentation photos, of course! The ejection seat for the Viggen was also tested at Holloman.
Cheers, Jimstix
 
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