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What happens to the fly ?

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MadProfessor8138

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So here's the scenario......
I'm in my truck and heading up the highway Saturday morning doing around 70 mph.
There had been a fly bothering me for a few miles so I decided to role the window down all the way in hopes that he would egress the vehicle.
A few miles later and the fly gets a little too brave and close to the slipstream and out the window he goes.

Now.......here's the question :

1. Did the fly's low body mass allow him to decelerate in the head wind and then fly on.....

OR....

2. Did the turbulant air make him tumble and he hit the ground.....

So........did the fly fly or did he die ???

Kevin
 
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MadProfessor8138

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The proper spelling can be weird...depending on where you look it up.
Fly is a proper spelling but flie also seems to be proper....but generally refers to flies (plural) but can also be used as singular.
I have always used ......fly.

I changed the post to the common spelling...


Did " u "....." mean" "you" ? .......lol

Kevin
 

choppergirl

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I'm going with... low body mass... high acelleration/deceleration (depending on your point of view) to match the speed of the slipstream... talk about some massive G's)... and then the fly flew on...

If the fly fell to the ground, it would be because her inner ear gyros (er, equivalent for a fly, probably inside her brain) were over powered and she's totally disoriented relative to gravity from being tumbled in the wind. Flies are pretty tough and use to some pretty strong air currents and quick accelerations / decelerations.

Throw a small pillow feather out the window *or plastic bag or reciept* and see what happens for yourself... whoosh! It's going to stay airborne and follow the air currents behind your truck... until the slipstream air current force lessens and the feather (or whatever) floats to the ground, assuming no other wind.

Hard to visualize, then take a dandelion (you know, thing with all those little parachutes), and blow on it What happens? The air current (relative to it) over powers the little parachutes and the follow the impulse of air until it dies out and they drift to the ground or on the wind.

I chuck you or a telephone pole into a tornado, gravity becomes relatively a negligible force, as the wind force becomes the dominant overpowering force that you or whatever is at the mercy of... : - ) To a fly getting sucked into the slipstream out side a car window at 60mph is like Dorothy getting sucked into a tornado...
 
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Wanttaja

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Don't know what the Vne of a fly airframe is, but suspect it's well less than highway speed. Wings probably tear off the moment it hits the slipstream. Sure, it decelerates quick (low mass) but the massive drag, even for an instant, it going to cause structural failure.

Ron Wanttaja
 

Dana

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The fly survives the departure without getting its wings ripped off because it accelerates slowly in the boundary layer... and then gets obliterated against the windshield of the 18 wheeler following behind.
 

rdj

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Not sure about the fly going out, but from personal experience at least 90% of the bees that fly IN via my drivers side window and then get accelerated quite quickly to freeway speed not only survive the experience but become quite agitated by their participation in the physics experiment.
 

Geraldc

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I pulled up on my motorcycle one day and my Lawyer friend sid you have been speeding .I asked why he said that. He replied that sandflies only stick to the front of your vehicle at speeds higher than highway legal.
 

crusty old aviator

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What happens to the flies in a tornado? Do they land on Chopper Girl‘s telephone pole and ride it out, or do they experience structural failures of their exoskeletons?
 

Wanttaja

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Not sure about the fly going out, but from personal experience at least 90% of the bees that fly IN via my drivers side window and then get accelerated quite quickly to freeway speed not only survive the experience but become quite agitated by their participation in the physics experiment.
Don't be silly, bees can't fly. All the scientists say so. :)
What happens to the flies in a tornado? Do they land on Chopper Girl‘s telephone pole and ride it out, or do they experience structural failures of their exoskeletons?
Ever have a fly on the outside of your windshield when you start driving? As the relative wind increases, they turn face into the wind, hunker down, and tuck their wings close to their bodies. Bet they try the same thing in heavy weather.

Ron Wanttaja
 

MadProfessor8138

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Ever have a fly on the outside of your windshield when you start driving? As the relative wind increases, they turn face into the wind, hunker down, and tuck their wings close to their bodies. Bet they try the same thing in heavy weather.
Funny that you point out that example.
Last year I had what I think was a May Fly on my windshield.
My son and I were taking bets as to how fast we had to go before it would finally lose its grip.
We got up to almost 70 mph before he was a goner.
And I think he could have held on longer if we hadn't passed a truck that threw in a crosswind....he was hanging in there like a hair in a biscuit until that point.
My Lincoln LS is pretty clean aerodynamically so I wouldn't have been surprised if he could have made it to 80-90 mph.

Kevin
 

D Hillberg

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The fly opened his mouth to scream as he was ejected into the slipstream
his lips flapped and whipped until he looked like a fly water melon .....
Landing by his buddies at the cow flop café he finally let out the pressure inside
Priffitt bubblr pop Pfrit frit frit
"**** Harry that was really rude, Not while we're eating!"
The End
 

MadProfessor8138

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I pulled up on my motorcycle one day and my Lawyer friend sid you have been speeding .I asked why he said that. He replied that sandflies only stick to the front of your vehicle at speeds higher than highway legal.
You know that you're a true biker when you can tell what kind of bug just hit you by the taste......
me-myself-irene-flies.jpg

Kevin
 

Pilot-34

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I always thought the rear tail fin on my impala just sliced them in half.
 

Pilot-34

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I once encountered a swarm of bees in the right lane of the interstate almost perfectly centered up like as a group they had decided on interstate travel.
This happened to me just outside of Sturgis on the day after it ended.
My semi truck passing through the swarm of course killed many of them by direct impact.
But judging from the reactions of several hundred motorcyclist behind me they were still quite lively after encountering the slipstreams and vortexes of my truck and trailer.
You may ask what about the motorcycles that were ahead of me. ?
They seemed to simply and rather quickly shift lanes to the passing lane.
Why didn’t I shift to the passing lane you may ask?
It was full of motorcycles!
 

Pops

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One time on my job I needed to fly all day at 12k with my C-172. When I left the airport at 750 agl I noticed a grass hopper hanging on to the skin of the left aileron. He hung on until about 5K with a climb speed of about 80/85 mph. At last he lost his grip and was hanging on by one leg for about 5 seconds and then he was gone. I wonder how long it took him to fall to the ground ? Did he starve to death before getting to the ground ? Inquiring minds need to know.
 

BJC

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So........did the fly fly or did he die ???
Having just finished cleaning bug parts from the leading edges of my wings (I’m based on a grass field), I’m certain that your fly survived, came here, and deposited his internals on the leading edge of my wing.

Please keep the next fly in your truck.

Thank you.


BJC
 
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