WA 1.2 or SpitSairWulfStang

Discussion in 'Member Project Logs' started by Will Aldridge, Oct 28, 2013.

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  1. Jun 25, 2016 #21

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    Finally have an engine!! Back in the version 1.1 days I had a couple of Corvair cores that I was going to rebuild for this bird but when I picked the second one up the guy selling them put me onto the rotary engine and I dropped the Corvair from consideration pretty quickly after that and sold off what I had.

    20160624_192322.jpg 20160624_192314.jpg

    Today was the first time I have actually seen a rotary in real life. For some reason the South East corner of Idaho doesn't attract too many rotaries and this is the first one that came up on craigslist anywhere near me since I've been looking. So $150 later I have an engine. The rear rotor lost compression and the guy I bought it from thinks the housing is scored. So it may only end up being a stand in for building my FWF but at that price it was worth it. School will be starting in a few months and that means I will probably wrap the engine up and store it for the next 2 years at least. But I have an Engine!!:ban:
     
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  2. Jul 3, 2016 #22

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    20160702_223414.jpg 20160702_223520.jpg 20160702_223254.jpg

    Finally started putting the seat back on. The seatback is made of two pieces of 1/8 inch ply. This is to allow it to go around the curve at the bottom and also to allow for the access to the cargo space behind the seat. The hole in one piece of ply is slightly smaller than the hole in the other piece which allows the cover plate to sit in place without falling through. I use a brad nailer to tack the forward piece in place but then realized that it was the part with the smaller hole cut in it and therefore should be the aft piece. So I'll have to take it off before I epoxy it. Thankfully I figured it out before I glued it all together.
     
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  3. Jul 6, 2016 #23

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    20160705_194315.jpg

    I have a seat back
     
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  4. Oct 20, 2016 #24

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    I've had a couple of questions regarding the status of the project. Life has a funny way of changing your plans on you. At the beginning of March I moved back to Idaho from Alaska with the intent of reentering the Aircraft Maintenance Program at Idaho State University. Long story short money got in the way or I should say lack of it and concurrent with the realization that i couldn't afford school I was offered an unsolicited well paying job in Utah with health benefits working for a home builder as a finish carpenter. Carpentry has been my main source of income for the past 12 years, but never so well paid.

    In any case it opened the door to finally building my own house. The only way it could happen was through the generosity of my boss. He is generaling the project for no profit and calling in a few favors to help me get it done under budget ($160,000). I'll be doing a lot of the work myself so even though I don't have a down payment for it I'll have at least $60,000 in equity in it by the time I'm done. And more importantly than that I'll have my own 1300 sq ft 3 bedroom 2 bath, 2 car garage house with an unfinished walkout basement (can anyone say heated workshop?) to build the plane in. I should have a hole in the ground in a couple weeks and 5-6 months after that I'll have a house and a place to work on my plane. Until then I basically have 2 full time jobs. Building houses for my boss and building my house. Obviously the project will be hibernating for awhile as there is no place for it in the apartment I'm renting and soon there will be no time to work on it even if it was here. My parents are graciously allowing me to store it in Idaho for the time being.
     
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  5. Jan 16, 2017 #25

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    IMG_20170115_162533_846.jpg IMG_20170108_123246_490.jpg

    My house is coming along. The second pic is my future workshop. One advantage of working for the company I am is that my boss is allowing the 6ft wide double door in the walkout basement because I can deal with any issues. He normally wouldn't do that for a customer since he'd be sending guys out regularly to adjust it since the wind out here can be pretty strong. But as long as I'm willing to deal with it I can build my plane in my basement.
     
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  6. Feb 12, 2017 #26

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    20170206_164021.jpg

    As you can see the house is coming along. The boss says it ought to be done in about 45 days.

    I guess I should provide an update since some major changes have occurred that I haven't mentioned.

    Perhaps the biggest one is my plan to sell the house in 2 years. I have a few debts that will keep the budget pretty tight untill then but with tax laws the way they are at that point I can sell it with no tax liability and divest myself of all my debt and have enough money for a significant down payment on the next house which will lower the monthly payment allowing more money for the plane. My boss says that the forecasts he's heard say the market is supposed to stay good for the next 2 years, so hopefully that's what happens.

    20170210_122629.jpg The other big change is that my boss gave me a third car garage. So now there is more than enough room to mount both wings (if I get that far in 2 years which is doubtful)

    It'll mostly be built in the basement because that's heated, but it'll be nice to have space if needed to do a full assembly.

    And here's some photos of my workspace. I had the electricians add some extra lights and a few more outlets than they'd typically put in an unfinished basement. I'm really looking forward to having a heated workshop AND keeping all my vehicles in the garage.

    20170210_122529.jpg

    20170210_122540.jpg
     
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  7. Mar 23, 2017 #27

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    20170320_220227.jpg

    Let there be light! Had they electricians add more lights than they typically would to an unfinished basement. I didn't want my workshop to be a cave
     
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  8. Apr 2, 2017 #28

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    20170401_164032.jpg

    I signed all the paperwork for the house yesterday, and hopefully I get green lighted to move everything in on Monday but in the meantime I can move some odds and ends into the basement and garage.

    The first of the much abused parts have arrived in their new home. Might make a trip up to Idaho next week to bring some more down.
     
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  9. Apr 30, 2017 #29

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    20170429_181054.jpg

    At long last something is actually getting done that affects the plane itself. I did make the trip to Idaho a few weeks ago and brought the rest of the parts down, and I've spent the last couple weeks dumpster diving for scrap lumber and begging the boss for some of the leftovers. As you can see I've begun construction of the jig the fuselage will be built on. Fortunately the boss said yes when I asked for the 14 ft tgis (wood floor joists). Being engineered lumber they're nice and strait (visually verified)and I couldn't resist setting parts on just to see how it will look. I've got a little more building to do then I'll put on legs which will be secured to the floor and the whole thing will be leveled as perfectly as possible. Then I'll start putting it all together and with luck it won't have to move until it's ready to come off the jig.

    I saw a thread asking how to increase the probability that the project will be completed, my answer to that was the spend the $200 I had budgeted for a used tv and bluray for airplane parts and tools. Tv is such a colossal waste of time. Now that the project is so close and there is no-one else in the house I might as well put the time to good use.
     
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  10. Apr 30, 2017 #30

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    20170429_215716.jpg

    The jig is pretty much complete, with the exception of being leveled, bondoed to the floor, and additionally stabilized. The cross pieces are located where the bulkheads go and those will be screwed in place then the foam and center section spars will be added then exterior will be glassed.

    The tail feathers and aft 2 ft of fuselage will be built separately then bonded in place before the fuselage is removed from the jig and flipped in order to glass the interior. I would have liked to make the jig a little shorter but it needed to be that tall to accommodate the vertical tail.
     
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  11. May 4, 2017 #31

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    20170503_220241.jpg the gremlins are out and have messed with the rotation and I don't know how to fix that on my phone.

    The jig has been leveled,
    squared, and glued to the floor using construction adhesive. And as you can see the bulkheads are all lined up nice and straight. This setup is definitely an order of magnitude better than the pre Alaska jig.

    And as in a previous post I like seeing as many pieces set in place as possible just to help better visualize it. The tail would have to move downwards about 6 inches to be in the correct position vertically but longitudinally it is in the correct position.

    Tomorrow the first order of business should be to clean up a little.

    20170503_221132.jpg
    20170503_221114.jpg
     
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  12. Jun 18, 2017 #32

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    Mostly design work going on lately. Although i borrowed the WAR Corsair wing I've made a significant number of modifications, the most relevant of which at this point is the fixed gear. So I've been working on the wing attach fittings and main gear mount.

    20170617_222545.jpg 20170617_222619.jpg

    I'm trying to decide build order and if i should build the center section of the wing into the fuselage while I'm building it or build the center section in its own jig and cut slots into the glassed fuselage after the fact. I've pretty much decided on option 2 at the moment.

    But regardless of build order or method these parts needed to be designed before i can continue. The main gear mount is composed of 4 pieces 20170617_224912.jpg , which are welded together and then bolted to the wing attach fittings (bolt holes not shown). The design is a hybrid of the war corsair and the Issacs Spitfire gear mounts.

    In order to get this all to work I'm going to have to get these parts cnc cut and have a professional machine shop make the bends. Looking at this now it might be prudent to not have the bolt holes cnc cut so there can be some wiggle room to account for other inaccuracies in the build when it's finally time to mount the gear.

    I'm still taking pictures of my computer screen with my phone and my cad program is over 10 years old so the pictures aren't the prettiest but they will have to suffice.
     
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  13. Jun 21, 2017 #33

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    Bill Jepson is developing or at least getting ready to produce and market a psru specifically designed for the rotary, it differs from the Tracy and Ross gear boxes in that the thrust line is offset from the e-shaft by about 2 inches. I have reworked my fwf to place the psru below the e-shaft (while keeping the same thrust line) which raises the engine. There used to be a large area above the engine that easily fit the induction system, now it's significantly more cramped but still useable. The radiator used to be laying flat under the engine, now I've stood it up under the engine cut it in half and doubled the thickness, and added an adjustable exit ramp.

    20170619_224253.jpg 20170619_224124.jpg 20170619_224026.jpg

    So that translates into cutting a 8 inch wide by 1.5 inch deep notch in the bottom of the firewall for the exit ramp

    20170619_223233.jpg
     
  14. Jul 23, 2017 #34

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    It took a long time to gather the courage to cut up the "boat" even more in order to fit the piece behind the seat, but as you can see i did it. Ive got to stop being so afraid of it. Foam is pretty easy to repair. Still need to make one more major cut for the bulkhead the main spar mounts to, and then a couple smaller cut outs for the exhaust and the cooling exit ramp.

    20170722_184254.jpg 20170722_184309.jpg 20170722_185416.jpg

    This last pic is my poor table saw. Its been in pieces for three years almost, since i burned the drive belts up doing scarf cuts on plywood. In that time it moved from Idaho to Alaska and back then to Utah. Not sure i still have all the parts or if i even remember how it goes together. I need it to cut longerons. Fingers crossed.

    20170722_185249.jpg
     
  15. Jul 25, 2017 #35

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    20170724_211537.jpg

    Not the best pic, but I'm starting to jig the vertical stab in place. Ive built bulkheads into the front and rear stab spars. I need to add the reinforcement to the front spar/bulkhead for the tail spring before i go too much further, which requires the table saw:mad2: I've just about concluded it's a basket case. I'm going to ask my boss if i can use the company saw for a few cuts.
     
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  16. Oct 22, 2017 #36

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    I've always said it takes a sledgehammer to get anything through my skull. One of a couple reasons that this project has stalled out lately is that my basement/shop is a disaster. The guy i work for is a firm believer in "everything has a place and everything in its place". It makes work so much easier when you know where to go to find something and the bench isn't piled high with junk. To that end i made myself a nice bench for my chop saw using some granite counter tops that would have gone inn the dumpster otherwise. Now i just have to make shelves so i don't pile it high with junk. I already had to clear it off to take the picture.:nervous:

    Went from this:

    20171019_214937.jpg

    To this:

    20171021_185241.jpg

    Much much better. Still have to extend the surface from the back of the granite to the wall and add a shelf above the whole thing, And add drawers under it but it's a start. I also salvaged one other counter top that will be part of my table saw setup.
     
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  17. Nov 4, 2017 #37

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    She lives!!! A few hours of figuring out a jigsaw puzzle of parts i had forgotten where they went and I've got my saw back. Good thing too. I've wanted it to help set up my shop.
    20171104_143244.jpg
     
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  18. Nov 5, 2017 #38

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    Well since i have my table saw back and i usually have to operate it alone, that required a table to run material onto since some of the cuts i need for the plane are fairly long
    20171104_201953.jpg

    So between the chop saw table and the table saw table I've a little more than tripled my workspace. And decreased the clutter at the same time(at least i have more places to stack stuff now).

    20171104_202009.jpg

    And the great thing about all this table space is it didn't cost me anything in materials (except screws). It was all salvaged stuff from work that would have gone in the dumpster otherwise.
     
  19. Dec 2, 2017 #39

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    A couple months ago a new member joined my EAA chapter and in his intro he said he had started building the WAR Corsair in the late 70's. Got most of the wood work done and fabricated most of the metal parts minus the retractable gear components. The project put a considerable strain on his marriage and he elected to abandon the project and save the marriage. He scrapped the airframe but kept the fittings for 30+ years since he couldn't bear to see all that time and money in the trash. He was very interested when i told him about my project and is only the second EAA'er to come visit it and he graciously gave me all the parts that might work on my plane!

    Among these jewels was a set of rudder pedals with toe brakes and master cylinders attached that he bought somewhere as they're not per WAR plans. I was going to have my rudder pedals suspended above the floorboards but these mount on the floor. So i rebuilt the cockpit mockup (fortunately my parents didn't chuck it while i was in Alaska). A few design changes necessitated the need to reprofile the seat contours but the seat is now built and i have a place to sit and make airplane noises in my basement.

    20171202_000824.jpg

    I'm going to be pretty cramped width wise and I'm wishing I'd designed it a little wider but length and height wise it's plenty roomy, like a sailplane i guess.

    20171202_124528.jpg

    Above are the aforementioned rudder pedals. The main task now is to decide how to mount them

    20171202_124636.jpg

    As you can see I've got some pretty big feet. I've always had instructors telling me to get off the brakes, not because i was anxious but because it's hard not to push on the brakes when trying to work the rudder pedals. I'm thinking I'm going to have to raise the pedals up 4 or 5 inches off the floor. I'm probably going to start a new thread to get comments on how best to mount these things. Anyway that's all for now.
     
  20. Dec 8, 2017 #40

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

    Will Aldridge

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    20171207_212033.jpg

    I made a few purchases today that i had been putting off thinking the money would be best spent elsewhere, but I've come to the conclusion that a trash can, broom, and dust pan will contribute immeasurably to keeping this project on track. A clean workshop is a far more productive one. Note the table behind the trash can. I haven't seen the top of it in months and it has discouraged me from doing any work on the project.

    20171207_212050.jpg

    Last night i built the shelf above my work bench. Obviously things have mostly just been piled on it but you'll notice the beginning efforts to hang tools in specific locations. So it's taken awhile but i finally feel I'm in a position to push forward making airplane parts. I'm taking tomorrow morning off work to go to a lumber supplier to get some Doug fir for my outer spar caps. Time to really have some fun.
     

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