Van's announces highwing RV-15

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Dantilla

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Except for the LSA RV-12, and the 6-cylinder RV-10, all Van's airplanes are designed to use a 4-cylinder Lycoming.
I'm thinking the RV-15 will probably continue the Lycoming trend.
 

Rhino

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Th RV-10 is designed to use a Lycoming too. But you might be reading something into that that isn't really there. Vans designs the cowlings and engine mounts to accept Lycomings by default due to a number of factors, such as reliability and availability of service options. But that by no means translates to them saying you shouldn't use a different engine should you choose to. Lycoming is just their default recommendation and personal preference. But yeah, you're probably right that they'll continue that trend.
 

Victor Bravo

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They have a long and successful relationship with the Lycoming company, the companies making Lycoming-style engines, and thousands of Lycoming engine customers/enthusiasts. Not likely to change.
 

BoKu

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My bet is cantilever...
Could be, but I'm betting on struts. The drag penalty is relatively modest, and it drastically improves the packaging relationship between the wing carrythrough, windshield, and pilot and passengers' heads. Especially so with non-laminar airfoils such as the 23xxx that have their maximum depth fairly far forward. Cessna got away with a high-wing cantilever configuration by using a laminar section that placed the spar fairly far aft, and also by using a massive highly-stressed forging for their carrythrough that gave them a bit more headroom. And now that carrythrough is at the center of a very troublesome AD.

I was going to ask Van about the RV-15 at the Multiplace Nationals, but the one time I had a good opportunity, he and Rex were up to their elbows in parts while changing the Solo engine in the Arcus, and I really didn't want to distract him. And he probably could only give me a non-committal answer with no information content.

20210617_153401.jpg
 

Victor Bravo

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I'm far more of a 'salesman personality' than Van is, but I'll bet he has marketing and sales and advertising people like me tucked away in a drawer someplace. They'd tell him all about 'brand identity', and that a Van's airplane should immediately look like a Van's airplane. Even if it takes some more fidgeting with the structure, or a taller cabin, or a machined steel carry-through as you mention.
 

Topaz

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Could be, but I'm betting on struts. ...
I'm betting on struts, too, but for the simple reason that if they're not there, it'll be a huge controversy as to whether it's "safe" or not, or if it's "heavier" or not, etc. Pilots don't like things that are "different," and a "back-country" cantilever high-wing is "different." They'll probably include struts whether they're structurally necessary or not, just to shut up the incipient chat-room arguments. ;)
 

llemon

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Yeah, they imply that its two seater but the 4 seater market might be an easier entry.
 

Deuelly

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Not if you're wanting a four seater. The two seat market is already well-represented in this segment.
The two seat market is well represented because the demand is there. The four seat back country experimental is a small market. Even in a 2+2 the rear is almost always used for baggage. Two seats with lots of baggage would be a better seller.

Brandon
 

Flyfalcons

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The two seat market is well represented because the demand is there. The four seat back country experimental is a small market. Even in a 2+2 the rear is almost always used for baggage. Two seats with lots of baggage would be a better seller.

Brandon
Possibly. But there's a reason 180s, 185s, and Katmais sell for so much.
 
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