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Using every inch of runway

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TFF

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Makes me think all the engines weren’t running. That or loaded to the gills. Overloaded. It was not moving very fast either way.
 

TFF

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I use to watch the Fed Ex 727s use every inch. They would be way over rotation speed when they pulled. Looked more like airshow takeoffs. They were not playing what if and tires be dam.
 

TFF

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I worked with some Russians at the regional airline. They knew how to be good mechanics but they would still do Russia things. They all had degrees if not multiple but they would still do the “it’s ok” pass it down the line. Someone else will handle it. My favorite on some sort of Illution with a spoiler fault. They would just unbolt the spoiler and leave the hole in the wing. Makes you want to visit.
 

TFF

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Like that DC10 that was flying all around the Pacific with the fan Seatbelted to keep it from spinning on the shut down engine. Flys in to an airport that cares and is grounded. That part of the world has different values. There use to be a guy around here that did those type of ferry flights for companies with a shut down engine. I have some friends that ferried a SAAB back to the factory and one of the engines started acting up. They knew if they wanted to get it fixed in Iceland where they got fuel, they would be stuck for weeks there. They took off with both engines so not to have suspicion and then shut the bad one down and flew the rest on one engine.
 

Pops

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Local C-172 got blown over on one wing tip in a storm. Bent the wing up about 6" at the tip and spars buckled at the strut attach fitting area. It was sold as a damaged aircraft to a man that took the wing tip off and shoved wood 2" by 4's in the lighting holes as far as he could and put the wing tip back on and flew it away. I kept checking on news for a C-172 crash, but he must have made it OK.
 

12notes

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About 30 seconds before this engine started, I noticed the packing tape on this propeller blade. Turbo Megha Airways (best airline name ever) ATR-72 in India.
They could've at least used duct tape.

IMG_20190210_154307.jpg

Since I had already taken two flights on Jet Airways the same year they had the following incidents, I didn't worry about it. I found out about these incidents the day before my second flight, which I needed to get home after 3 weeks in country.
A week before I flew with Jet Airways, they had a flight turn back, and 30 passengers went to the hospital, because the pilots forgot to turn on the cabin pressurization.
8 months before I flew with them, the flight crew on a 737 got into a fight, the first officer hit the captain, and the captain left the cockpit. When the captain did not return right away, the first officer went looking for the captain. You can do the math to figure out how many people were flying the plane at this time. Fortunately, the cockpit door did not lock behind them.

It's not just the maintenance who are "pros".
 

Twodeaddogs

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Dunlavin, County Wicklow,Ireland
A friend of mine worked for a firm that overhauled C-130s,among other things. One fine day,a well worn C-130 came in and was duly lined up for overhaul and my friend, a sheet metal worker, was tasked to reskin the ramp. He noticed all these discs on the outer skin, each one a few inches apart.Upon closer examination,it turned out to be the national coin of the owner nation,each one with a hole drilled in it for a rivet, so that they acted like a large washer. The entire skin had to be replaced, as were many other skin panels of the aircraft.
 

TFF

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So was the ramp being use to smuggle money out or was it bling to say this plane is “Money”
 

narfi

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So was the ramp being use to smuggle money out or was it bling to say this plane is “Money”
I am assuming it is a country who's currency is worth less than the price of the washer needed to cover out the worn out hole it was installed over.
 

pictsidhe

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A friend of mine worked for a firm that overhauled C-130s,among other things. One fine day,a well worn C-130 came in and was duly lined up for overhaul and my friend, a sheet metal worker, was tasked to reskin the ramp. He noticed all these discs on the outer skin, each one a few inches apart.Upon closer examination,it turned out to be the national coin of the owner nation,each one with a hole drilled in it for a rivet, so that they acted like a large washer. The entire skin had to be replaced, as were many other skin panels of the aircraft.
The RAF has been known to use 'penny' washers. Strangely, 2 of the 3 RAF Hercules I've seen in flight were below me. Though I was not airbourne and they were...
 

Mad MAC

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Dec 9, 2004
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Hamilton New Zealand
An Indonesian F27 (Navy I think) got a bit low on patrol and bent the prop tips on the sea, then a bit later got flown to NZ in said state for overhaul. Then there is the story of F27 dart engines being started in Indonesian by rapping a rope round the prop (or spinner never seen a pic) and attaching it to a car.
 

Twodeaddogs

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I am assuming it is a country who's currency is worth less than the price of the washer needed to cover out the worn out hole it was installed over.
Greek drachmas. Aircraft was riddled with corrosion and was essentially scrap but was rebuilt as new. I recall an old sweat in overhaul saying to me that, with certain exceptions, the further South and East you went, the worse the aircraft got. My personal favourite was a 767 that had been hauling horses,without a rubber cover on the floor. It came in for a C-check and when the lads took up the floor panels, the frames were corroded away from horse pee to about half their height. They reckoned that the floor panels were holding it together. The owner's rep simply shrugged and said "fix it" and it was and it flew out and the cheque was cashed.
 

narfi

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Local C-172 got blown over on one wing tip in a storm. Bent the wing up about 6" at the tip and spars buckled at the strut attach fitting area. It was sold as a damaged aircraft to a man that took the wing tip off and shoved wood 2" by 4's in the lighting holes as far as he could and put the wing tip back on and flew it away. I kept checking on news for a C-172 crash, but he must have made it OK.
I have seen and/or assisted with and/or signed off the ferry flight for several home depo spar repair repairs on planes ranging from 180/185s to bonanza to pa31-350s. It isn't airworthy, but with a special flight permit it can be safe for ferrying.
Alot can be held together with plywood, 2"xs and sheetrock screws. Including a set of Aerocette floats that ripped the bottom of 1.5 compartments off on a rock forming a water scoop that forced water up through the hatch lid and over the tail in a solid stream of water.

Greek drachmas.

In 2002 the drachma ceased to be legal tender after the euro, the monetary unit of the European Union, became Greece's sole currency.
 
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