Plans for Wooden Glider or Motorglider

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Atomic_Sheep

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Hi guys, I'm interested in building a wooden sail plane or motorglider like the k13 for example, does anyone have any links to plans for something like this? Preferably dual seater and motor glider in preference to a glider.
 
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fly2kads

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I'm not aware of anything currently available that meets that description. (I would be happy to be enlightened, if there were!) I have least half a dozen sketches of two-seat wooden gliders, powered and un-powered, in my little sketchbook. They are in my "maybe someday" file.
 

spduffee

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The link below is from the beloved Nurflugel site.

Charles Fauvel and his Flying Wings

I think the Mitchell U2 has been converted to a 2 seater before. Did I see that here on HBA? Yes, it was, Bernard Fournier:

https://www.homebuiltairplanes.com/forums/aircraft-design-aerodynamics-new-technology/11332-flying-wing-blended-wing-body-bwb-question-where-start.html

The U2 plans are available for sale at

: : US Pacific - Home of the Mitchell Wing Ultralights : :

Probably not much help, but maybe inspirational...? :ermm:
 
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bmcj

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Too bad there are no plans out there for the Fournier RF4/RF5. That would be a set of plans I would definitely buy!
 
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BoKu

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Hi guys, I'm interested in building a wooden sail plane or motorglider like the k13 for example, does anyone have any links to plans for something like this? Preferably dual seater and motor glider in preference to a glider.
Kind of a nitpick, but I believe that the K13 has a welded steel fuselage. But that's a pretty minor point; the materials and welding required should not be considered an impediment.

Probably the closest thing you're looking for in single-seaters would be the Woodstock. In multiplace sailplanes there just hasn't been that much activity in the homebuilding world. I've got a whole sermon on that, that I'll not bore you with the whole thing right now, but the bottom line seems to be that multiplace gliders are most economically justifiable when they can be used for rides and instruction. And those activities are not allowed in experimental gliders under most regulatory environments.

Occasionally taking friends and family for rides is fun and rewarding, but in the greater scheme of things does not seem to compensate for the greater mass and complexity, and reduced performance and operationality, of typical two-seaters. Which is not to say that two-seaters cannot have the same performance and utility as single-seaters. It's just that within the valid set of compromises that yields a usable two-seater, the things most compromised are performance and ease of assembly. And the obvious reason for compromising them is to avoid spending a ton of money on exotic materials, tools, and processes. Where money is no object, things like the EB28 will give a Ventus or AS*.(>23) a run for the money any day of the week.

Thanks, Bob K.
 

Atomic_Sheep

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Thanks for the responses guys. The Woodstock is looking interesting. Found the plans for it, might start giving it a crack. More design suggestions welcome.

Moderator removed potential IP violation.
 
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BJC

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Thanks for the responses guys. The Woodstock is looking interesting. Found the plans for it, might start giving it a crack. More design suggestions welcome.

Moderator removed potential IP violation.
Anyone know what airfoil it uses?

Thanks,


BJC
 
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dino

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Fournier RF5 is iconic. Along the lines of Woodstock is the BJ1B Duster.

Dino
 

BoKu

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Anyone know what airfoil it uses?
Yes, it's an Irv Culver special with different root and tip sections that gives a washout effect without actual wing twist. When you look at the plans you see it is a very elegant application of RIFPIB principles.

Thanks, Bob K.
 
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BoKu

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...More design suggestions welcome.
Not necessarily a design suggestion, but I generally tell folks who are interest in building a glider not to start a glider project until they've gotten their license and done a handful of flying. The reason being that it's hard to know what sort of soaring you like best until you've done some of it. I've seen a couple of folks start Woodstocks or Monerais or 1-26 rebuilds, only to decide that it was going too slow and didn't suit their needs, so they proceed to go out and buy a Libelle or other first-gen fiberglass glider. Then they fly that while the "project glider" languishes in the basement. If they'd waited a bit, they could have gone all-in on the glider they actually wanted, and gotten something with better utility and performance.

Of course, that situation is far from universal. For a lot of folks, a Woodstock or Duster serves their needs perfectly. But I suggest keeping an open mind. Until it is time to decide, it is time to not decide.

Thanks, Bob K.
 

BJC

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Yes, its an Irv Culver special with different root and tip sections that gives a washout effect without actual wing twist. When you look at the plans you see it is a very elegant application of RIFPIB principles.

Thanks, Bob K.
Thanks on the airfoil, but what does RIFPIB stand for?


BJC
 

BoKu

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Thanks on the airfoil, but what does RIFPIB stand for?...
"Round In Front, Pointy In Back." :)

The general idea is that unless you're looking for huge amounts of laminar flow (not likely on a fabric-covered wing), if your airfoil looks about like others that are known to work reasonably well for the desired application, it will probably be fine.

Thanks, Bob K.
 

cluttonfred

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For a different approach, how about the Michel Barry designs, open cockpit microlight Souricette and the enclosed single-seat Mini-Bulle and two-seat Souris-Bulle? Not really promoted as touring motorgliders per se but that's what they are in effect. All are wood-and-fabric with limited use of foam and fiberglass.
 

BJC

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For a different approach, how about the Michel Barry designs, open cockpit microlight Souricette and the enclosed single-seat Mini-Bulle and two-seat Souris-Bulle? Not really promoted as touring motorgliders per se but that's what they are in effect. All are wood-and-fabric with limited use of foam and fiberglass.
Those are really neat little airplanes. Thanks for mentioning them. I had not heard of them, but I bet they there are lots of non-USA airplanes that are good performers, but get little to no publicity here. Too bad.


BJC
 

Atomic_Sheep

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Haha sorry, the RF5 is what I was talking about.

Not necessarily a design suggestion, but I generally tell folks who are interest in building a glider not to start a glider project until they've gotten their license and done a handful of flying. The reason being that it's hard to know what sort of soaring you like best until you've done some of it. I've seen a couple of folks start Woodstocks or Monerais or 1-26 rebuilds, only to decide that it was going too slow and didn't suit their needs, so they proceed to go out and buy a Libelle or other first-gen fiberglass glider. Then they fly that while the "project glider" languishes in the basement. If they'd waited a bit, they could have gone all-in on the glider they actually wanted, and gotten something with better utility and performance.

Of course, that situation is far from universal. For a lot of folks, a Woodstock or Duster serves their needs perfectly. But I suggest keeping an open mind. Until it is time to decide, it is time to not decide.

Thanks, Bob K.
Thanks for the suggestion
 
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