New Lincoln TIG-200

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by Chris In Marshfield, Aug 1, 2016.

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  1. Aug 1, 2016 #1

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

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    At Oshkosh this year, I was finally able to get myself to go over and take the TIG workshop. I have no idea what took me so long to do that. While I've done a wee bit of O/A welding on and off over the past few years (mainly just to stay in practice until I actually use it in earnest), I couldn't believe how nice it was to weld with a TIG torch! The temperature control was wonderful with the foot pedal, and the quality of the welds was outstanding. When doing a lap weld on steel, the amount of burn-back I was getting while welding was crazy minimal, and the joints where amazing. Welding with AC on aluminum was really nice, too, and the process felt really natural.

    So, being a good student, I went over to the Lincoln booth and ordered a TIG-200. Oshkosh show special was $200 off, plus I got a nice set of gloves and 10 pounds of filler material. Sadly, living in the Wisconsin Tax Zone, I got the pleasure of putting that $200 back on the price in the form of sales tax. But I'm really looking forward to using it on the Expedition. The cost of the welder will likely be recouped quickly on the fuel tanks alone, versus sending them out to get done.

    I'm really looking forward to the adventure, as well as not storing Acetylene in the basement (my current workshop). That feeling of knowing that I won't come home and find my house displaced by a half mile should the well pump contactor spark meet a low-hanging gas cloud is a good one.
     
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  2. Aug 1, 2016 #2

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    I have one, it's a wonderful machine. You'll be having lots of fun with it. Once you get your feet wet and a little practice behind you I'll borrow you some of my Furick cups and diffusers for that torch. You'll be in heaven.

    Bang for your buck it's the best machine for hobby welders.
     
  3. Aug 1, 2016 #3

    Autodidact

    Autodidact

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    I been looking at that one, too.
     
  4. Aug 2, 2016 #4

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

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    My question is when you're welding a tubing cluster and tubes meet at acute angles with little clearance, how do you get the torch close enough to weld out the cluster? It usually requires extending the tungsten well beyond the torch collet, adding a gas lens and turning up the argon but I have never gotten very good results. Does the Furick cup allow this with better argon flow?
     
  5. Aug 2, 2016 #5

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

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    I wondered the same. In class, we had the tungsten pretty far up against the cup. You'd really need to stick it out there for the clusters, I'd imagine.

    Looking at this builder's post for his Bearhawk LSA, he has an interesting torch configuration, presumably to combat this while welding clusters. If you read through the entire thread, you'll notice that his tube clusters look fabulous.

    LSA140 Build - Bearhawk Forums
     
  6. Aug 2, 2016 #6

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

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    The other important thing I learned is that you have to be able to see! I also learned that one during gas welding class a number of years ago. Driving a desk and staring at a screen all day, every day, has really taken its toll on my eyeballs. Having magnifiers or reading glasses handy will be absolutely necessary. Welding that aluminum was the hardest because I needed to be really close to see and maintain electrode spacing.
     
  7. Aug 2, 2016 #7

    THRC12

    THRC12

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    Use a super sharp tungsten and extend it out with higher gas flow. Use a gas lens and a decent size cup and weld out all the cluster joint. On the race cars we build I partially weld the initial joints around before the next tubes are tacked. Not always feasible or necessary though for strength.
     
  8. Aug 2, 2016 #8

    THRC12

    THRC12

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    On, and we have a Lincoln 200. Needed an extra welder for the shop while another was being repaired. Great machine for the money.
     
  9. Aug 2, 2016 #9

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

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    Which usually requires a gas lens and even then it's difficult to get a good purge in the weld area. I know people do it, just with my limited TIG experience I was never able to get satisfactory results. I'm sure some dual instruction/practice would help.

    His welds certainly seem to improve as the build/thread progresses. This is a good sign and gives me hope. I struggled with gas welding until one day it just clicked and everything came together. After than it's just a matter of staying in practice. I've also been thinking about taking the TIG plunge but was set on the Miller machine. Now have to go back and look at the Lincoln machine as well. They have certainly made advances with welding technology.
     
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  10. Aug 2, 2016 #10

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    Yes, the Furick cups have diffusers which allow better flow and therefore longer "stick out".

    Remember something, the stock #17 torch is a generic torch that works for most things. Gotta do a little hot rodding to the torch for good cluster welds.

    I also build dams around clusters using tin foil and plumbers putty, but the glass Furick cups are the only way to go.
     
  11. Aug 2, 2016 #11

    Little Scrapper

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    Here's a photo. The width is greatly enlarged and because of the diffusers the gas flows evenly and consistent. For a cluster you can always stick out further but like I say, I build a dam around clusters.

    Always use purple electrodes. Once upon a time purple didn't exist, the purple you now get use to be a graye until.the AWS decided to standardize the combination and reclassify it as a purple. The grays have no standard, that's why they exist.

    For clusters go get yourself a short electrode cap and cut the purples short, this gives you a small torch head.
     
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  12. Aug 2, 2016 #12

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    Here. There's a large assortment of options, just buy the whole kit.
    20160802_092849.jpg
     
  13. Aug 2, 2016 #13

    Winginit

    Winginit

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    What type and size electrode are you using for the thinwall tubing ? Be careful about increasing gas flow as it can cause turbulence and defeat your purpose if you increase it too much.
     
  14. Aug 2, 2016 #14

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    Here. You want a small head, Furick wide glass lens with diffusers using purple electrodes. I've tried every combination over many many years so I'll save you the headache of trying to figure it out.

    With that purple you can sharpen the electrode right up, just be sure the grind marks are vertical with the rod. The type of arc that 200 puts out doesn't tolerate crappy grinding so take your time.
    20160802_093749.jpg
     
  15. Aug 2, 2016 #15

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    Now, they have diffusers, just leave the gas be. That's never been an issue.
     
  16. Aug 2, 2016 #16

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    Diffusers.
    20160802_094507.jpg
     
  17. Aug 2, 2016 #17

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    Just a helpful tip......

    If you have experience in oxy welding you already know that it benefits the welder to have slight gaps in tubing fit-ups. Welding is heat management. Period. A gas torch heats a large area compared to a TIG, and a tight fit can cause unwanted warping.

    With TIG it's different. Tight fit-ups are crucial to successfully welding a joint. Your first priority should be to master these fit-ups. Take your time. The TIG welding process is not designed for gap filling.

    I know, I harp on this every single welding thread, but please spend hours and hours just running beads on flat steel. Most of the important welding lessons are learned on running flat beads. This allows you to learn about settings, heat control, hand control, etc. It's not fun because it doesn't seem like welding but it's crucial.
     
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  18. Aug 2, 2016 #18

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    Check out the Furick cups called a BBW. Look at the stick out on that bad boy. It's the biggest they make, not really useful in aircraft construction but gives you an idea of the possibilities that exist. This would use plenty of gas.
    20160802_143309.jpg
     
  19. Aug 2, 2016 #19

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

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    And it's totally worth repeating. I'm going to have to get good at tight-fitting joints. If I'm not good at it, I've got my OA as a backup. But I'd rather the TIG work because, well, it's an expensive machine. :lick:
     
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  20. Aug 2, 2016 #20

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

    Chris In Marshfield

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    And the truck just drove up with the new rig. So this evening may be spent exploring!
     
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