My cheap rotisserie

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,674
Location
Wisconsin
I build a very different type of rotisserie the other day. I gave myself a goal of spending the least amount possible knowing I’d throw it out. It really worked well, in fact incredibly well.

Materials.......

6 - 2x4’s
4 - 1/2” gas flanges.
2 - 6” x 1/2” gas nipples
4 - round 12” - 16” wood discs in plywood or you can buy these at local box store.
1 - C Clamp or a quick release clamp (best)

Some screws, a saw and a hole saw/spade bit/forstner bit.

I weld on a adjustable roller stool from Northern tool. Most bad welds can somehow be traced to “out of position” welding. So you always want to be comfortable and “in position”. A rotisserie and a adjustable stool allows you to be in the best possible position.

It’s real simple. It’s adjustable up and down. It’s adjustable by rotating and clamping. You can micro adjust it so you can give yourself the best chances of success.

C91A9F4E-95B3-4791-912F-0D302885D734.jpeg
B2B6FABF-CF6B-48BC-AC12-02BEE53A9516.jpeg
8CCF03D9-AE6F-4A68-A27F-0C0A68FDA45F.jpeg
07EE5CDA-FC3C-42B6-BC96-24A8A8B604F0.jpeg
B864C2EA-6F0E-46FC-94A7-F67467A733EA.jpeg
 

wsimpso1

Super Moderator
Staff member
Log Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2003
Messages
6,697
Location
Saline Michigan
Looks like a good tool. It will serve for welding and painting and then for covering and painting of the fuselage, then the same for each of the wings.

May I lay claim to it when you get ready to pitch it? I cruise through several times a year and this would set the timing - family and friends in MN, airplane boneyard for a used engine up that way too. I will use it for painting my wings.

Billski
 

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,674
Location
Wisconsin
You don’t need two either, you can build just one for say the firewall and just put the tail on a saw horse or something like a bench etc. Anyhow, thought I’d share because for the money it worked really well! The coolest part ever was when you have it clamped and your in your stool and your ready to lay some wire and your thinking, “dang, I should adjust this just a hair more” you simple stay in your stool and grab the fuselage and give it a slight twist. The 1/2” gas nipples will tighten on one end and loosen on the other giving you that micro adjustment without re clamping. The key is to tighten the 4 discs reasonably tight so you can do this later on when needed. Again, it worked great and I spent like $30 on everything.

I forgot to mention the metal brackets. Those are made by Stimpson and all box stores have them. Very cheap. They are next to the rafter ties and hoist hangers section of the store.

Have a good weekend.
 

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,674
Location
Wisconsin
I would love to weld up a fuse one day. Could you please show the step by step process when you weld it? I.E. what pattern, straightening, etc? Thank you!👍
I’m not sure I understand the question. You mean order?

I can tell you this, never ever forget this. A joint that isn’t really well fit is a nightmare for any amateur. We are all amateurs here. If you really do a great job on fitting your tubing the welding is a breeze.

When you have gaps and you’re forced to bridge weld these gaps you you are in a world of hurt, literally it’s like a form of punishment.

Other than that I’d say welding rod / filler is a major obstacle and causes many many people to give up. Somehow this dam industry is fixated on using 1/16” rod and that’s the worse possible advice ever.

I take a massive roll of 80sD2 mig wire and cut a 8-10’ piece and weld with that. I almost always use .035”

I’ve helped a few people mover the years and my first question when they are pulling bout hair and wanting to quit is “what’s your filler?” And they always use these dam heavy filler rods. Using the correct filler is a night a day difference. It’s a total game changer. Here’s why.

Let’s not complicate things. Everything over thinks this stuff. You have heat and you have metal. Period.

Ok, you have this little ball of liquid metal called a puddle. If you over heat it when you don’t want to you’re headed down a rabbit hole. If you cool it when you don’t want to you’re headed down a rabbit hole. Every time you dip your rod you are cooling the puddle. Literally read that a hundred times. When you dip your rod you are cooling your puddle. So, if you use a heavy rod guess what happens? Yup, you are RAPIDLY cooling the puddle. So then what? Now your pour on the heat......another rabbit hole you can’t recover from.

If the filler matches the tube guess what? You can go slow and use low heat. Yes!!!! That right there is 99% of the solution.

You take out as many variables as you can and you are setting yourself up for success.


Other than that you start at the firewall and weld each cluster 100% in a cork screw motion until you arrive at the tail. I don’t brace anything and my latest fuselage came out within .020” of overall twist.

You are always welcome to visit and spend the weekend with me welding in my shop. I have lots of scrap to practice on.
 

poormansairforce

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2017
Messages
923
Location
Just an Ohioan
I’m not sure I understand the question. You mean order?

I can tell you this, never ever forget this. A joint that isn’t really well fit is a nightmare for any amateur. We are all amateurs here. If you really do a great job on fitting your tubing the welding is a breeze.

When you have gaps and you’re forced to bridge weld these gaps you you are in a world of hurt, literally it’s like a form of punishment.

Other than that I’d say welding rod / filler is a major obstacle and causes many many people to give up. Somehow this dam industry is fixated on using 1/16” rod and that’s the worse possible advice ever.

I take a massive roll of 80sD2 mig wire and cut a 8-10’ piece and weld with that. I almost always use .035”

I’ve helped a few people mover the years and my first question when they are pulling bout hair and wanting to quit is “what’s your filler?” And they always use these dam heavy filler rods. Using the correct filler is a night a day difference. It’s a total game changer. Here’s why.

Let’s not complicate things. Everything over thinks this stuff. You have heat and you have metal. Period.

Ok, you have this little ball of liquid metal called a puddle. If you over heat it when you don’t want to you’re headed down a rabbit hole. If you cool it when you don’t want to you’re headed down a rabbit hole. Every time you dip your rod you are cooling the puddle. Literally read that a hundred times. When you dip your rod you are cooling your puddle. So, if you use a heavy rod guess what happens? Yup, you are RAPIDLY cooling the puddle. So then what? Now your pour on the heat......another rabbit hole you can’t recover from.

If the filler matches the tube guess what? You can go slow and use low heat. Yes!!!! That right there is 99% of the solution.

You take out as many variables as you can and you are setting yourself up for success.


Other than that you start at the firewall and weld each cluster 100% in a cork screw motion until you arrive at the tail. I don’t brace anything and my latest fuselage came out within .020” of overall twist.

You are always welcome to visit and spend the weekend with me welding in my shop. I have lots of scrap to practice on.
Sorry, yes, by pattern I meant the order of welding joints. So by rotational do you mean all the way around at one bulkhead and then proceed to the next or do you weld a joint and then rotate the fuse and do the next joint on the next bulkhead i.e. corkscrew?
 

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,674
Location
Wisconsin
Like this. Seems to work well. Like I say, I don’t brace anything. Tack welds hold things well and since a fuselage is a series of triangles engineered to work together literally nothing moves on you, hang it and weld away. Just start at the firewall and always weld in the best possible position and pattern the sequence like a spring.

A40ED4F3-4258-4DD6-BEE8-F0F95906F611.jpeg
 

Armilite

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
3,267
Location
AMES, IA USA
For a Narrow Light Weight Frame, you could use (2) Cheap Engine Stands, which could also Double an Engine Stand for your Engine, and to work on your Wings.
TRAILER HITCH STAND 1.jpgEngine Stand 132.jpgEngine Stand 1.jpgFrame Rotisserie 2.jpgFrame Rotisserie 1.jpg
 
Top